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Old 04-15-2009, 12:41 AM   #1
jgardner6
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Do low pressure burners take a special type of propane? I didn't know if there was anything besides normal propane.



 
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Old 04-15-2009, 12:49 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgardner6 View Post
Do low pressure burners take a special type of propane? I didn't know if there was anything besides normal propane.
Just normal propane is fine.


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Old 04-15-2009, 12:59 AM   #3
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"low pressure" in this case generally means 11"w.c. or under (so like 0.4 psi). Usually these are the types of burners used on gas grills, camp stoves, etc.

Most turkey fryers are designed for high pressure (10+ psi (or 270+ "w.c.) operation Higher pressure can achieve higher power in a smaller package but are less efficient and burn worse, generally speaking.

Functually speaking, you could use a low pressure burner, however most consumer grade equipment is limited to 50-80k Btu and has a small, short, hot flame not ideal for boiling wort. Low pressure cylinder connectors are black and attached to a low pressure regulator. High pressure connectors are green and attached to a, you guessed it...
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Old 04-15-2009, 01:47 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chillHayze View Post
"low pressure" in this case generally means 11"w.c. or under (so like 0.4 psi). Usually these are the types of burners used on gas grills, camp stoves, etc.

Most turkey fryers are designed for high pressure (10+ psi (or 270+ "w.c.) operation Higher pressure can achieve higher power in a smaller package but are less efficient and burn worse, generally speaking.

Functually speaking, you could use a low pressure burner, however most consumer grade equipment is limited to 50-80k Btu and has a small, short, hot flame not ideal for boiling wort. Low pressure cylinder connectors are black and attached to a low pressure regulator. High pressure connectors are green and attached to a, you guessed it...
Thanks for the info. I was looking at the brutus 10 plans and they said to get low pressure burners. Why would I want to do that if it doesn't boil wort as well. Also I could assume that low pressure wouldn't be good for bigger batches, say 10 to 20 gallons?

 
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Old 04-15-2009, 01:52 AM   #5
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Low pressure burners can be beneficial if you have a direct fire mash tun. It will allow you to control heat more precisely without risking big swings due to big flames.
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Old 04-15-2009, 02:05 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carnevoodoo View Post
Low pressure burners can be beneficial if you have a direct fire mash tun. It will allow you to control heat more precisely without risking big swings due to big flames.
Ok, that being said could a low pressure 92,000 btu burner get 20 gallons of wort up to a boil in about 30 mins?

 
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Old 04-15-2009, 02:22 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgardner6 View Post
Ok, that being said could a low pressure 92,000 btu burner get 20 gallons of wort up to a boil in about 30 mins?
92K BTUs? That'll do it. That seems like a lot of power to me.
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Old 04-15-2009, 02:46 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carnevoodoo View Post
92K BTUs? That'll do it. That seems like a lot of power to me.
Thats what the brutus 10 plans asked for, or somewhere around that area.

 
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Old 05-02-2009, 03:12 AM   #9
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I have found the Brutus plans contain errors in several areas and since I just ordered the plans recently its clear the sources have changed also.
There are a couple options on burners, but clearly he used high temp Jet Burners these things are like 100,000 BTU. But they are not cheap I found two options one is here
Jet Burners at some $95.00 each or I am thinking I can hard pipe natural gas to my brewing area since I have it and go with this unit Jet Burner, 23 tip, natural gas, for chinese ranges: Kitchen Supply Direct, Inc. at $20 bucks each. But the same thing to LP would require only a smaller orifice, the thing is there are conversion kits on the web just google it.

One item not noted in the BOM are the pilot lights for the burners, and qty of things like the switches and end caps for the casters are also wrong. Can you build this sculpture you bet but it is not for a novice for sure and with costs now for metal you might save a few bucks but going pre-made. Me I am to far into mine to quit.



 
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