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Old 04-12-2009, 03:29 AM   #1
Beerbeque
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I just brewed batch #30 and picthed it onto the yeast cake and trub of batch#29. This is the first time I've used this technique and WOW in just two hours the beer is bubbling wildly and the kraeusen is 3" high already. With a OG of 1.072 I'm expecting a big blowoff on this beer. Maybe I should do this more often instead of pitching a new dry yeast each time. I still love the simple pleasures of this hobby.


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Old 04-12-2009, 03:31 AM   #2
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I like to pitch on a yeast cake sometimes just for the fun of watching the wild fermentation. I'm such a geek!


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Old 04-12-2009, 03:32 AM   #3
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Yep, that s*** will happen. I trust you have a blowoff tube installed.

In the end, you'll have some awesome beer, and you'll have saved ~$6 on liquid yeast.
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Old 04-12-2009, 10:20 PM   #4
BA_from_GA
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planning on trying this out in a few weeks. going to rack a porter on to vanila and burbon in secondary, and then put a Belgian quad on the yeast cake. Hopefully the quick vicious fermentation will do the high gravity Belgian well.

 
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Old 04-12-2009, 10:41 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beerbeque View Post
I just brewed batch #30 and picthed it onto the yeast cake and trub of batch#29. This is the first time I've used this technique and WOW in just two hours the beer is bubbling wildly and the kraeusen is 3" high already. With a OG of 1.072 I'm expecting a big blowoff on this beer. Maybe I should do this more often instead of pitching a new dry yeast each time. I still love the simple pleasures of this hobby.
Note that it is worth checking the numbers on a yeast calculator (e.g. mrmalty) and decanting some of the cake to avoid overpitching by too much. You basically have a 5 gallon starter.

With a 1.072 you've got 5-6 times as much yeast as you should; that's enough extra that I'd decant some (if it's only 2-3 times as much or less I wouldn't bother, unless it were a Belgian or hefe or something similarly yeast-important).
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Old 04-13-2009, 03:03 PM   #6
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whats the risk of over pitching exactly?
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Old 04-13-2009, 03:11 PM   #7
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whats the risk of over pitching exactly?
The risks are many, Dave Logsdon of Wyeast was quoted saying:

I try to stay within 20% of my ideal pitch rate and I prefer to slightly under pitch rather than over pitch. This causes more cell growth, more esters, and better yeast health. Over pitching causes other problems with beer flavor, such as a lack of esters. Changes in the flavor profile are noticeable when the pitch rates are as little as 20% over the recommended amount.

 
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Old 04-13-2009, 05:37 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BA_from_GA View Post
planning on trying this out in a few weeks. going to rack a porter on to vanila and burbon in secondary, and then put a Belgian quad on the yeast cake. Hopefully the quick vicious fermentation will do the high gravity Belgian well.
I don't think it will. Everything that I've read says that you're better off to under-pitch belgian beers. I'm about halfway through "Brew Like A Monk", and they say that proper pitching rates are critical to get the right character from belgian brews. I heard the same thing from the head brewer of a local micro that specializes in belgians. They re-use yeast for 8 generations, and measure out slurry and pitch the proper amount for each batch.

I just did this when I re-used yeast... I added about a quart of water, shook everything up really well, and poured it into a gallon jug. After the trub settled out, I racked off the yeast still in suspension, and then let it settle again for a bit. Once another smaller layer of trub had settled out, I scooped out about a cup of slurry and pitched that.

I basically followed a simplified version of the "yeast washing howto".
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Old 04-13-2009, 05:54 PM   #9
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I don't think it will. Everything that I've read says that you're better off to under-pitch belgian beers. I'm about halfway through "Brew Like A Monk", and they say that proper pitching rates are critical to get the right character from belgian brews.
+1 on this; Belgians and hefeweizens and other beers that depend on yeast esters for a huge proportion of their flavor are the ones where you're most likely to notice bad results from overpitching.
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Old 04-13-2009, 06:42 PM   #10
TampaTim
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Forgive the noobish que here?

But how do you store the yeast between batches? More specifically, do you rack a fresh beer right into a dirty bucket? What if you are not going to brew for a week or two after you rack the beer off the cake? Do you still rack into a dirty bucket? Or do you store the yeast elsewhere?



 
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