Spike Brewing Giveaway - New v3 Kettle

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Old 05-10-2011, 05:00 AM   #141
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It sounds like this is coming along just fine. Complex at 1 year of aging. I wonder what it'll be like next May.


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Old 05-10-2011, 05:17 AM   #142
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bubbachunk View Post
So perhaps carb it up you are saying?

I may transfer a gallon to a fresh keg and carb it up. I will still have 4 gallons to do whatever I wish with
I agree, if it tastes like flat soda, carb it.


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Old 05-19-2011, 08:02 AM   #143
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OK, so don't kill me. I haven't read through the whole thread. Has anyone tried using an oven to get good caramelization of the honey without risk of burning (or constant stirring)? What I'm thinking of is setting a sturdy pot full of honey in the oven at 240-250 for several hours, or until done. Anyone try this, or shall I be trailblazing here? I'm tempted to try.
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Old 05-20-2011, 12:24 AM   #144
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GuldTuborg View Post
OK, so don't kill me. I haven't read through the whole thread. Has anyone tried using an oven to get good caramelization of the honey without risk of burning (or constant stirring)? What I'm thinking of is setting a sturdy pot full of honey in the oven at 240-250 for several hours, or until done. Anyone try this, or shall I be trailblazing here? I'm tempted to try.
I dont know about that, the honey is very volatile. If you wanted to try it I would say put in a cup to test it out and see what you come out with.
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Old 05-20-2011, 01:54 AM   #145
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GuldTuborg View Post
OK, so don't kill me. I haven't read through the whole thread. Has anyone tried using an oven to get good caramelization of the honey without risk of burning (or constant stirring)? What I'm thinking of is setting a sturdy pot full of honey in the oven at 240-250 for several hours, or until done. Anyone try this, or shall I be trailblazing here? I'm tempted to try.
GuldTuborg, I'd test it first but it sounds like a good idea. I had actually considered this earlier today when I read through the post.

I roast garlic about twice a week (I love garlic!) and have been experimenting with different additions to it. One of those has been honey. After 40-45 mins in the oven at 400 degrees, the honey comes out a very dark amber color. I imagine longer times would produce the black honey that you're looking for in this recipe.

But I would definitely give it a few test runs with different temps/times to see what works best.
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Old 05-20-2011, 02:08 AM   #146
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3 dog brew - I'm in the same boat as you. I assume I cooked mine too fast and just really burnt it. I was thinking about blending it with a porter or darker beer, to uniquely add a roasted flavor.
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Old 05-21-2011, 05:38 PM   #147
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If I'm reading wikipedia right, sucrose caramelizes at 230 F and fructose caramelizes at 320 F. Has anyone tried heating to caramelize the sucrose, but keep the fructose. If so, how did that affect the honey?
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Old 08-11-2011, 12:25 AM   #148
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Just tasted mine after 1.5 years of fermenting/aging. It is fairly tasty but still a bit harsh. I am going to split and strip a vanilla bean and add that to a growler then fill with the burnt mead. I think the vanilla will really mellow out the bitterness that is lingering right now, if so I may reserve a gallon or two with no beans (I made 5 gallons) and bean up the rest.
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Old 08-16-2011, 01:34 AM   #149
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I wanted to add to this thread today as I've just finished wrapping up my first bochet mead! There's some things that I've discovered, which I think I've seen hinted at on other pages/sources, but I think they bear repeating (read: big safety issues!):

1) when honey boils, the apparent volume increases DRAMATICALLY! 18 lbs of honey is a couple inches in the bottom of my kettle...once boil hit, the level of "liquid" is at *least* 4 to 5 times higher! Bottom line: you need a MUCH bigger kettle than you might think...

2) the boil requires constant attention to fiddle with the heat level, and needs to be stirred almost constantly to prevent even further rises in the boil and subsequent boil over.

3) Boiling honey is damn f*&King hot! And it likes to splash up and out with the bigger bubbles...my ring and pinky fingers will tell you that you would be well served to wear some sort of protective glove, or probably even better, a *really* long spoon.

4) When you add the water at the end of the boiling, DO NOT add it quickly. I mean this...literally add it like an ounce or so at a time. When water hits hot honey, it boils instantly and sprays damn f*&King hot boiling honey everywhere.

5) Do this outside, but be prepared to battle the bees, wasps and other assorted insect fiends...it would help to have a partner just to shoo/swat them away.

All in all though, my brew was very successful, and I'm really excited at how this will turn out. It smells awesome, is a beautiful shade of mahogany brown, and the hydrometer sample tastes like drinking a perfectly roasted marshmallow....
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Old 10-18-2011, 03:05 AM   #150
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Oops, accidental post



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