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Old 04-01-2009, 12:30 AM   #1
tspilker
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Default Would this work for milling?

We got a new coffee grinder and espresso machine from an estate sale recently for $40. Retail value for the grinder was $816 and $1400 for the machine.

My question is, this grinder has adjustable milling options for courser and finer grinds.. Would this grinder work well for milling malt?

here is the grinder:

http://www.lapavoni.com/model.asp?li...mercial&id=142

What do you think?


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Old 04-01-2009, 01:30 AM   #2
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I'm not exactly sure how those work, but if it comes out looking anything like ground coffee or espresso, then no, you can't use that. Besides running the risk or ruining a great looking coffee machine, and it taking forever to actually grinding 10+ lbs of grain, the husk being intact is important for preventing stuck sparges amongst other things.


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Old 04-01-2009, 01:32 AM   #3
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Grinding bad...

You want to crush the grain, literally. You want to squeeze it til it basically pops out of its husk. Cracking the kernel maybe into thirds or quarters.

A grinder wil pulverize the husk and the kernel.
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Old 04-01-2009, 01:33 AM   #4
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Ebay it sell it to a restuarant supply get half of what it's worth and buy a new grain mill.
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Old 04-01-2009, 02:02 AM   #5
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That's a beautiful grinder. What machine did you get? I've got a Macap M5 and a Quickmill Vetrano.

-Joe
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Old 04-01-2009, 02:15 AM   #6
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Holy freaking crap! I'd be willing to take all that off your hands for the price of a barley crusher. Screw trying to mill malt, just make yourself some awesome espresso!
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Old 04-01-2009, 02:40 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tspilker View Post
My question is, this grinder has adjustable milling options for courser and finer grinds.. Would this grinder work well for milling malt?

here is the grinder:

http://www.lapavoni.com/model.asp?li...mercial&id=142

What do you think?
If it is adjustable to the point where it is fracturing breaking all the grain and still leaving it coarse enough for lautering, sure it will work. I cannot say it will work well though because it is a "grinder" and not really a mill where the barley is crushed. Although not its intended purpose, you could probably mill barley w/ it and make beer.

Seems like a waste of a high quality machine? But for the investment, if you are inclined to try it, I say go ahead.
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Old 04-01-2009, 05:27 PM   #8
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This is taken from a previous post I made somewhere (with edits):
Quote:
Here's my experiences with a coffee grinder. I have a commercial coffee grinder that (up until my last brew) was the only "mill" I had ever used for my brewing grains. It doesn't look like yours, however, but more like the ones you see at the supermarket to grind your coffee - boxy with a big hopper on the top.

The mill itself is much more aggressive than a corona mill type setup. Even though it is fully adjustable, it does not provide nearly as consistent a grind as does the corona. It shreds the grains as opposed to crush. I found I got more flour, a lot more shredded husks, and a lot more uncracked grains.

I have had a corona gathering dust for years, but never used it, as I had the coffee grinder. I finally motorized the corona and used it for my last batch. My efficiency went from 65% to 72%. The mill was the only change in procedure. Also, I should state that my efficiency had been dead on 65% for years and many batches.

That said: the coffee grinder gets the job done....and QUICK!!! (Another reason why I was loathe to stop using it - with 60 Lbs of grain needed for one batch....) I never had a stuck sparge with it. The other advantage is it's a LOT less messy.

I had thought about grinding down the teeth on the coffee grinder to see if it would improve the results, but now I think I am gonna stick with the Corona as I am very pleased with its performance and the efficiency increase.

Just my experience - YMMV! Cheers!
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Old 04-02-2009, 01:29 AM   #9
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That makes sense Sleepy. Coffee grinders, like the OP's and probably yours are made for grinding the hell out of some coffee. The high end grinders are the only ones that can truly produce a good espresso grind. In grain terms, thats flour.
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Old 04-02-2009, 01:29 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nostalgia View Post
That's a beautiful grinder. What machine did you get? I've got a Macap M5 and a Quickmill Vetrano.

-Joe
Its a Nuova Simonelli Oscar

Link'd! Oscar Espresso Machine


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