Best Yeast for super malty taste? - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > Best Yeast for super malty taste?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-24-2009, 04:13 PM   #1
ApolloSpeed
Recipes 
 
Sep 2008
Posts: 226
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts



Which yeast produces the best malty taste? Like in Irish Reds, Oktoberfest....and beers like that. I love the super malty taste!

WLP830? 833? 820? Or something else?


Or is it more about using alot of grain? Like Munich, Vienna, and German Pils.
__________________
*************

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2009, 05:26 PM   #2
mkling
Recipes 
 
Nov 2008
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Posts: 743
Liked 9 Times on 8 Posts


Malt type, mash temperature, and yeast strain all matter. For malts, the three you listed above are all good at producing a malty profile, for the Pils especially if you use a decoction mash. Higher mashing temps will also get you there with 155-158F giving you more malty characteristics. Finally, if you do a search for yeast strains and attenuation, you'll find that some yeasts convert fewer sugars to alcohol, making for a more malty beer. (For instance, 820 is listed as 65-73%, 830 as 74-79%, and 833 as 70-76%, so 820 would likely create a more malty finished beer assuming all other things are equal.)
__________________
Currently On Draft: Bamberger Rauch Dunkel, Belgian Blond, Pilsener Urquell clone, Smoked Porter
Bottled: Concord Pyment, Mi'Apa Sparkling Mead, Chimay Blue, Old Simcoe American Barleywine, Old Cantankerous
Fermenting and Conditioning: Pseudo-Decoction Munich Dunkel, Left Hook Bitter
Recently Kicked Kegs: Fresh Hop Pale Ale, Citra Rye IPA
On Deck: Old Rasputin, Northstar IPA, Ur-bock Dunkel

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2009, 05:39 PM   #3
ApolloSpeed
Recipes 
 
Sep 2008
Posts: 226
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


I got you.....so the Attenuation is what leaves that malty flavor behind....


and the higher mash temp like you said. I think I gotcha.
__________________
*************

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2009, 05:40 PM   #4
DeathBrewer
Maniacally Malty
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
DeathBrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2007
Oakland, CA
Posts: 21,790
Liked 269 Times on 134 Posts


Munich and Vienna are nice and malty. Using those in a recipe and mashing a little higher will give you a wonderful malt character.

Yeast attenuation is a little different. It leaves "sweetness" if it doesn't ferment out all the way. More of a sugar sweetness than a malt sweetness.

Think about it like this (a bit simplified, but should help the explanation):

Some yeast can only eat so many simple sugars.

Some yeast can only handle so much alcohol in their environment.

Malt that is mashed at a higher temperature will be more dextrinous, and have more complex sugars.

Malt that is mashed at a lower temperature will be more fermentable and you'll end up with a more dry end product.

There are many other factors, but basically it goes like this:

Mashing high and fermenting with a highly attenuative yeast will leave you with a dextrinous yet dry beer.

Mashing high and fermenting with a lower attenuator will leave you with a dextrinous, malty, sweet beer.

Mashing low and fermenting with a highly attenuative yeast will leave you with a clean, dry beer.

Mashing low and fermenting with a lower attenuative yeast will leave you with a "sweet" beer...basically it leaves sugars behind that other yeast would gobble up and turn into alcohol.

Of course, using certain malts will give you a malty character no matter what you mash at. Vienna and Munich will always impart malt character. Again, there are a great number of factors, but hopefully this will help.
__________________
Easy Partial Mash Brewing - Stovetop All-Grain Brewing

"Death is always with us." - Brewpastor

Quote:
DIAICYLF
We will remember...

Likefully Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2009, 06:50 PM   #5
foxtrot
Recipes 
 
Jul 2007
Arvada, CO
Posts: 132

Using WLP041 Pacific Ale Yeast makes a super malty ale. I think its from Red Hook.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2009, 09:04 PM   #6
ApolloSpeed
Recipes 
 
Sep 2008
Posts: 226
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


SO...maybe 50/50 bill of Munich and Vienna....some German pils and maybe a small touch of caramunich, or carapils, or crystal.

Mashing between 155-158f.....a high FG yeast ...fermented in the 50's.....would produce a nice malty beer.

Have I got the plan right?
__________________
*************

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2009, 09:22 PM   #7
DeathBrewer
Maniacally Malty
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
DeathBrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2007
Oakland, CA
Posts: 21,790
Liked 269 Times on 134 Posts


I would mash lower. A high ratio of munich and vienna will make it already malty. Combine that with a low attenuative yeast and you won't need that high mash temp. I'd shoot 152-154F.

"dextrinous" is not usually a good quality. I try to never mash over 154F...with the exception of the occasional mild.

Other than that it sounds good.
__________________
Easy Partial Mash Brewing - Stovetop All-Grain Brewing

"Death is always with us." - Brewpastor

Quote:
DIAICYLF
We will remember...

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2009, 11:42 PM   #8
BigEd
Recipes 
 
Nov 2004
Posts: 2,617
Liked 203 Times on 169 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by ApolloSpeed View Post
I got you.....so the Attenuation is what leaves that malty flavor behind....


and the higher mash temp like you said. I think I gotcha.
You can have a well attenuated beer that is still very malty. A good Oktoberfest is exhibit A. Maltiness comes from the malt first and foremost. You can't make chicken salad out of chicken s&%#. Higher mash temps leave more longer chain sugars & dextrins but that affects the body much more than the flavor. An underattenuated beer is more likely to be flabby and sweet rather than malty. Sweet and malty are distinctly different.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2009, 02:39 PM   #9
pjj2ba
Look under the recliner
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
pjj2ba's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jul 2006
State College, Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,379
Liked 206 Times on 167 Posts


I use WLP 833 for my lagers that I want to play up the richness in. I use it for my Oktoberfest, bocks and a CAP. For German and Czech Pils, I use WLP 802 or Wyeast 2042. For the later, the maltiness is mainly from the grain bill. I could use the same grain bill for the Pils with the 833 yeast and it would result in a richer beer. Both I would call malty, but the 833 one is richer. I think a lower attentuation is only part of the explaination for this. I suspect it does have alot to do with which sugars the strains will and won't eat, plus other metabolites produced by the yeast.

I've recently bought the WLP 041 Pacific coast ale yeast because it is supposed to play up the malt flavors. I hope to use it soon.
__________________
On Tap: Doppelbock O'fest, Pale Ale, cider
Kegged and Aging/Lagering: CAP, Ger. Pils, OKZ (std Amer. lager), CZ Pils, Amer. Wheat, Rye IPA, Saison
Secondary:
Primary: Ger Pils, CAP
Brewing soon: Pale lager, Amer. wheat
Recently kicked : (
Pilsner Urquell Master Homebrewer
(1st NYC 2011, 2nd NYC 2012)
P U crowns winners in its inaugural master HB competition

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2009, 03:47 PM   #10
mkling
Recipes 
 
Nov 2008
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Posts: 743
Liked 9 Times on 8 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by pjj2ba View Post
I use WLP 833 for my lagers that I want to play up the richness in. I use it for my Oktoberfest, bocks and a CAP. For German and Czech Pils, I use WLP 802 or Wyeast 2042. For the later, the maltiness is mainly from the grain bill. I could use the same grain bill for the Pils with the 833 yeast and it would result in a richer beer. Both I would call malty, but the 833 one is richer. I think a lower attentuation is only part of the explaination for this. I suspect it does have alot to do with which sugars the strains will and won't eat, plus other metabolites produced by the yeast.

I've recently bought the WLP 041 Pacific coast ale yeast because it is supposed to play up the malt flavors. I hope to use it soon.
Like you, I've taken pretty much the same grainbill and made a well attenuated pilsner or a rich malty helles depending on the yeast strain I use. I use one of the Pilsner Urquell strains to get the high attenuation for the Pilsner and 833 to get the malty richness of a helles. Of course, they also have very different hopping rates, but to me the yeast makes a big difference in the malty profile of these beers.
__________________
Currently On Draft: Bamberger Rauch Dunkel, Belgian Blond, Pilsener Urquell clone, Smoked Porter
Bottled: Concord Pyment, Mi'Apa Sparkling Mead, Chimay Blue, Old Simcoe American Barleywine, Old Cantankerous
Fermenting and Conditioning: Pseudo-Decoction Munich Dunkel, Left Hook Bitter
Recently Kicked Kegs: Fresh Hop Pale Ale, Citra Rye IPA
On Deck: Old Rasputin, Northstar IPA, Ur-bock Dunkel

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Malty taste appearing in keg gtn80 Bottling/Kegging 15 07-31-2009 06:56 PM
Will overly malty taste mellow over time? LeeF All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 7 02-26-2009 05:33 PM
Help me get that malty taste sixtyten All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 17 12-13-2008 03:56 AM
Getting that malty taste? bnscherm All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 4 10-24-2008 07:54 PM
Non-malty taste The Apprentice Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 8 07-25-2005 08:26 AM


Forum Jump