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Old 03-23-2009, 01:09 AM   #1
nuthin_original
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I am under the impression that hot and/or cold break material, if left in the wort during the entire fermentation, can possibly bind to yeast cells during fermentation, thereby possibly causing inadequate nutrient uptake for the cells, as well as a sluggish fermentation. I am also under the impression that irish moss binds with hot and/or cold break materials during the 15 minutes in the boil. So, what do y'all think about allowing the hot/cold break/irish moss precipitates in the cooled wort settling thoroughly to the bottom of the fermentor, and then pitching the yeast? Would the settled materials stay at the bottom and not interfere with the fermentation?

THANKS!!!


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Old 03-23-2009, 01:12 AM   #2
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I try to keep as much of the hot/cold break solids out of the fermenter as possible. When you transfer you can use a cheesecloth or a screened funnel to help with that while aerating the wort at the same time.


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Old 03-23-2009, 01:30 AM   #3
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I've never had sluggish fermentation or any other negative from tossing the whole kit and kaboddle in the fermenter in the last 5 years of brewing. The yeast finds the sugars just fine and everything falls to the bottom eventually using Irish moss or not.

I'm curious about where you got the information that hot/cold break binds to yeast? I don't think I've ever heard it but would like to read what it says.
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Old 03-23-2009, 01:51 AM   #4
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I used to strain it out a bit but now I just dump the whole deal. No problems so far, I believe in simplicity wherever possible.
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Old 03-23-2009, 04:56 AM   #5
nuthin_original
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nurmey View Post
I've never had sluggish fermentation or any other negative from tossing the whole kit and kaboddle in the fermenter in the last 5 years of brewing. The yeast finds the sugars just fine and everything falls to the bottom eventually using Irish moss or not.

I'm curious about where you got the information that hot/cold break binds to yeast? I don't think I've ever heard it but would like to read what it says.
I read about this in the Home Brewer's Answer Book by Ashton Lewis - it says that this trub leaves a film on the surface of yeast cells. I guess I also am a bit concerned about making sure this trub gets separated and removed because some of my first batches had an off flavor. I figured it came from the trub after reading about it, and separated it from the wort in subsequent batches which gave a better flavor... I think. Its just kind of a PITA...
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Old 03-23-2009, 05:11 AM   #6
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I have read so much stuff on brewing I can ;t remember half of wher I get it from but,

Hot Break is best left in the kettle.

Hot Trub: Formation and Removal

Cold Break is okay to some degree in the fermenter.

BT - Cold Trub: Implications for Finished Beer, and Methods of Removal

However, Irish Moss does not actually work in the kettle. The Carrageenan is actually just made soluable by the heat. IM actually goes to work in the fermenter at temps below about 65*F, IIRC.

http://www.brewerssupplygroup.com/pd...Technology.pdf

 
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Old 03-23-2009, 03:09 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nuthin_original View Post
I read about this in the Home Brewer's Answer Book by Ashton Lewis - it says that this trub leaves a film on the surface of yeast cells. I guess I also am a bit concerned about making sure this trub gets separated and removed because some of my first batches had an off flavor. I figured it came from the trub after reading about it, and separated it from the wort in subsequent batches which gave a better flavor... I think. Its just kind of a PITA...
My friend and I had this same problem when we first started brewing, and it led us to using an upside down carboy system (to approximate a conical) to get the trub out:



However, after getting some more experience on my own, and soaking in all the great information around here, I think that the off flavors were most likely caused by high fermentation temps. I use a strainer when I transfer to primary, but there is always still a ton of trub and I haven't had any problems with a long primary/no secondary.
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Old 03-23-2009, 03:39 PM   #8
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That is funny that you did that Juan. I was totally thinking the same thing and using a bung with a tube going all the way up to the airspace above in order to releive pressure. I just figured that in the end, it isn't worth it for me.
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Old 03-23-2009, 04:02 PM   #9
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Yeah, it sort of works, but the reason for it was unfounded. I've never used a conical, but I assume that it works A LOT better than this does. We just ended up losing volume and having a much harder time cleaning the carboy.


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