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Old 03-18-2009, 04:22 PM   #1
mikefranciotti
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I brewed an all extract Irish Stout a few weeks ago and bottled last night. I love Guinness and must say, my Irish Stout tasted very similar.

After priming/bottling, I sampled what was left in the bottling bucket. Wow I kind of wished I hadn't primed the batch... Maybe done 50/50 prime/no prime.

My question is, if I were to make this again and bottle w/o priming, will the brew get better with age having done nothing?
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Old 03-18-2009, 04:23 PM   #2
ChshreCat
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Just to clarify... you want to make flat beer... in purpose?
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Old 03-18-2009, 04:26 PM   #3
llazy_llama
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What your beer tastes like flat with priming sugar mixed in, and what your beer tastes like after ~3 weeks bottle conditioning at 70 degrees are two very different things. Wait until it's time to drink them, then you'll probably think a bit differently about wanting to make flat beer.
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Old 03-18-2009, 04:26 PM   #4
mikefranciotti
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Yea to clarify, I want to make it smooth like Guinness... I know nitrogen is used to prime Guinness but at this point I've got no clue how to do that. Figured maybe this was an easy trial/error.
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Old 03-18-2009, 04:27 PM   #5
mikefranciotti
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thanks llama
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Old 03-18-2009, 04:29 PM   #6
ChshreCat
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Guinness is carbonated. Leaving your beer flat won't make it more like Guinness, IMHO.
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Old 03-18-2009, 04:29 PM   #7
llazy_llama
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Really, the only way you're going to get that perfect creamy head is to keg, and use beergas (usually about 75% CO2/25% Nitrogen) to dispense. You can also keg and use a special stout faucet to get nearly the same effect. Bottling it, it's never going to be 100% perfect, but you can get pretty close.
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Old 03-18-2009, 04:50 PM   #8
mikefranciotti
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Point taken guys. Thanks for the quick advice.

Once the money starts rolling in more steadily, I'll probably invest in kegging.
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Old 03-18-2009, 04:54 PM   #9
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BUT I think if I recall, I heard in the past somewhere that in england anyway, they often used to serve ale at room temp and not very carbed at all. Not sure what bearing that has, but I often taste my samples after fermentation w/o any real carbing and they taste great at 72ish degrees.... my 2c's :P
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Old 03-18-2009, 05:08 PM   #10

The level of carbonation matters immensely; too much carbonation in a stout, and you're left with something watery and biting (from the carbonic acid).

How much priming sugar did you use?

 
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