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Old 03-16-2009, 10:43 PM   #1
flyerdx
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Default New to Kegging. Having Foaming issue

I am new to kegging and am getting nothing but foam. At the moment I just have a Picnic tap, and 6' of 1/4" id tubing.Co2 is set at 10. my fridge temp is set at 35 .I have read a bunch, but am still confused as to what to do. Should I go with longer tubing, switch to 3/16 tubing.
Adjusting the co2 pressure never made any difference.
Thanks


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Old 03-16-2009, 10:56 PM   #2
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I'd say it's the diameter and length of your tubing. WHen I had foaming problems, biermuncher and others suggested 10' of 3/16 and it solved all my problems. I still have several taps with 6' and you can tell a huge difference on the same system - longer hose = less head. The hose absorbs the pressure as it passes through rather than delivering it to your glass. My guess is you'd need 15+ feet of 1/4" hose to absorb all that if you think about the surface area the beer contacts prior to the glass.


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Old 03-16-2009, 11:01 PM   #3
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I'd say it's the diameter and length of your tubing.
Funny, that is exactly what she said...
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Old 03-16-2009, 11:11 PM   #4
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http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/cure...oubles-100151/

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Old 03-17-2009, 12:28 AM   #5
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What happens if the hose is too long. I just picked up a 20' piece of 3/16..
I figured it's easier to start longer.
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Old 03-17-2009, 05:18 AM   #6
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Been there!

1. Switch to 3/16" beverage line. The key word being "beverage". The walls of the tubing are thicker and the inside of the line is smoother. There is a difference.

2. A pic nic tap is more prone to foaming than a regular tap. You may have to back the pressure off some when serving. The same if you use the shorter beer lines. Not a big deal, but not quite a set and forget arrangement either.

3. Over carbed beer can cause foaming problems. You can bleed off pressure, but it takes longer than you might guess. Sometimes several days of pulling the pressure relief valve repeatedly. A tip off is when you have a lot of foam, but little carbonation remaining in the pour. It seems counter intuitive, but that is what can happen.

4. Keep the beer lines cool as well as the beer when possible.

If the hose is too long, you will need to apply too much pressure to the keg to get a decent flow rate at the tap. This will eventually result in the beer becoming overcarbed and you will find yourself back to square one.

Get your beer carbed to the desired level. I would suggest beer lines of six feet. This way, the lines are not so long as to be a nuisance, yet you can serve the beer at a moderate pressure. Up the pressure to the normal 12 psi or so for storing and bleed off some gas when serving. You will use a little more CO2 doing it this way, but no big deal. Keeping the keg at the lower serving pressure will reduce the carbonation level in the beer, but this happens fairly slowly and it's easy to return it to the proper level with an overnight pressure boost.

You'll get the hang of it soon enough and this will all become second nature to you. Do some trial and error stuff with what we've given you here and you will be on your way.
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Old 03-17-2009, 05:26 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Catt22 View Post
Been there!

1. Switch to 3/16" beverage line. The key word being "beverage". The walls of the tubing are thicker and the inside of the line is smoother. There is a difference.

2. A pic nic tap is more prone to foaming than a regular tap. You may have to back the pressure off some when serving. The same if you use the shorter beer lines. Not a big deal, but not quite a set and forget arrangement either.

3. Over carbed beer can cause foaming problems. You can bleed off pressure, but it takes longer than you might guess. Sometimes several days of pulling the pressure relief valve repeatedly. A tip off is when you have a lot of foam, but little carbonation remaining in the pour. It seems counter intuitive, but that is what can happen.

4. Keep the beer lines cool as well as the beer when possible.

If the hose is too long, you will need to apply too much pressure to the keg to get a decent flow rate at the tap. This will eventually result in the beer becoming overcarbed and you will find yourself back to square one.

Get your beer carbed to the desired level. I would suggest beer lines of six feet. This way, the lines are not so long as to be a nuisance, yet you can serve the beer at a moderate pressure. Up the pressure to the normal 12 psi or so for storing and bleed off some gas when serving. You will use a little more CO2 doing it this way, but no big deal. Keeping the keg at the lower serving pressure will reduce the carbonation level in the beer, but this happens fairly slowly and it's easy to return it to the proper level with an overnight pressure boost.

You'll get the hang of it soon enough and this will all become second nature to you. Do some trial and error stuff with what we've given you here and you will be on your way.
good advice. definitely check your carb -- if you force (over) carbed, then you might get all foam too. If that's the case, you'll have to let it sit for a few days to let it settle.
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Old 03-18-2009, 03:35 AM   #8
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I appreciate the help. I switched to 3/16 and bought a stainless tap. Turned co2 down to 6psi to serve. Only get about 1 inch foam to a 500 ml glass. So this is much better than 500 ml of foam.. This is my first keg attempt so I figured there would be trial and error. I've been making beer for like 15 years.. Just don't want to bottle as much now.. I have some Grolsh bottles with flip tops so I don't mind bottling a batch of them. No Capping involved.
Another question,, What is good to clean my kegs with. To sanitize them. I can't get iodophor around here.
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Old 03-18-2009, 06:54 AM   #9
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Another question,, What is good to clean my kegs with. To sanitize them. I can't get iodophor around here.
I use oxiclean or oxiclean free (available at target) and StarSan for sanitizing. I really love starsan. Also, I don't know if anyone mentioned this, and it is probably common knowledge, but I find that if you open the picnip tap (or any tap for that matter) wide open vs. partially opening it, you get MUCH less foam. If I partially open it, I always get foamed out.
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Old 03-18-2009, 08:06 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by ScottyT View Post
Funny, that is exactly what she said...
Sheesh... I shouldn't have, but I lol'ed. If it's any consolation, I felt guilty about it afterwords.


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