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Old 07-06-2006, 12:50 AM   #1
digdan
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Default Yeast for Summer Days

In the Summer my house maintains a nice 72 to 76 degrees. While that seems nice to me, it kinda rough on the yeasties. What yeast/styles are recommended for fermentation temps in that spectrum?

Bonus would be to give me a recipe


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Old 07-06-2006, 12:55 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digdan
In the Summer my house maintains a nice 72 to 76 degrees. While that seems nice to me, it kinda rough on the yeasties. What yeast/styles are recommended for fermentation temps in that spectrum?

Bonus would be to give me a recipe
i use safale o4 and us56. Both can handle 75 F and are pretty quick. The safale ferments 80 percent in 48 hrs.


Ive got an apa, a stout, and a bitter. Just keep the gravity on the low end (<1.050) and make whatever you want...

heres my bitter recipe:

8 lbs muntons pale ale
.5 lbs briess crystal (10L)
.5 lbs dark muscovado sugar (15 min)

1 oz northdown (60 min)
.5 oz northdown (15 min)
.5 oz northdown (8 min)
.5 oz northdown (dryhop)

safale 04 (2x11gram)
1 whirlfloc tab (15 min)
1 tsp gypsum

mash: 152, 60 min 170,10 min
og 1.044
fg 1.008
ibu 35


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Old 07-06-2006, 01:39 AM   #3
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Belgian yeasts are well capable of fermenting in that range.
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Old 07-06-2006, 12:49 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digdan
In the Summer my house maintains a nice 72 to 76 degrees. While that seems nice to me, it kinda rough on the yeasties. What yeast/styles are recommended for fermentation temps in that spectrum?

Bonus would be to give me a recipe

Good timing I just asked the same question in begginers forum. Thanks.
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Old 07-06-2006, 01:36 PM   #5
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Nottingham also works well up to 75F and it is very clean & ester free.

Stick with recipes that are NOT dependent on yeast esters: IPA, APA, Browns, porters, stouts, Califonia Common.

Belgian yeasts will be fine, if you are making a Belgian. Try and use it for anything else & you'll still have a Belgian. Nothing wrong with them, I just don't like Belgians. Just thinking about a Belgian-style stout gives me the willies.
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Old 07-06-2006, 02:17 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by david_42
Nottingham also works well up to 75F and it is very clean & ester free.

Stick with recipes that are NOT dependent on yeast esters: IPA, APA, Browns, porters, stouts, Califonia Common.

Belgian yeasts will be fine, if you are making a Belgian. Try and use it for anything else & you'll still have a Belgian. Nothing wrong with them, I just don't like Belgians. Just thinking about a Belgian-style stout gives me the willies.

David,

I'd like to do a porter for my first batch, do you know of any good recepies which would compliment a bit warmer weather? I'd like to do a "partial Grain" I think, where you steep the grains in a bag.

I was checking out Midwest's kits and they use Muntons yeast for the most part.

Todd
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Old 07-08-2006, 12:30 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by david_42
Nottingham also works well up to 75F and it is very clean & ester free.

Stick with recipes that are NOT dependent on yeast esters: IPA, APA, Browns, porters, stouts, Califonia Common.

Belgian yeasts will be fine, if you are making a Belgian. Try and use it for anything else & you'll still have a Belgian. Nothing wrong with them, I just don't like Belgians. Just thinking about a Belgian-style stout gives me the willies.
Isn't Nottingham a dry english yeast? I've had mild succcess with London Ale strains from White Labs at these temps (if you like a trace of esters)


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