Why does bottle-conditioning improve life/stability? - Page 2 - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Brew Science > Why does bottle-conditioning improve life/stability?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-13-2009, 08:17 AM   #11
yeoldebrewer
Recipes 
 
Sep 2008
American Southwest
Posts: 447
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


Can anyone comment on the effect of carbonation pressure on yeast in bottle conditioning?
Does the CO2 pressure just slow down the action of the yeast, or have other effects as well?

Sometimes I could swear my beer has a cleaner taste just out of the fermenter before bottle conditioning.
__________________
My airlock passes gas.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2009, 08:25 AM   #12
z987k
 
z987k's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2007
Anchorage
Posts: 3,518
Liked 30 Times on 28 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by yeoldebrewer View Post
Can anyone comment on the effect of carbonation pressure on yeast in bottle conditioning?
Does the CO2 pressure just slow down the action of the yeast, or have other effects as well?

Sometimes I could swear my beer has a cleaner taste just out of the fermenter before bottle conditioning.
actually increased pressure makes the yeast work cleaner, but slows their growth.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2009, 05:09 AM   #13
Poindexter
 
Poindexter's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Oct 2007
interior Alaska
Posts: 1,195
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts


Hey guys, I have not tasted this beer in over a year, but judging by the stacked reviews it isn't getting any worse:

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f38/ris-...s-brews-62424/

I brewed it Nov-07, racked off the yeast in Dec 08 after I think six weeks, then I drove it from LA to Dallas in Jan 08, continued bulk aging to Mar 08 when I bottled.

I am really looking forward to cracking one of these in a couple more months; but I don't age session beers I can barely keep in stock.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2009, 06:35 PM   #14
rocketman768
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
rocketman768's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2008
Evanston, IL
Posts: 1,083
Liked 25 Times on 22 Posts


There was a thread quite a while back about a guy who found his dad's old brewing stuff and a few bottles of beer that had been sitting there for about 15 years. He cracked it open, and said it tasted ok.

Here goes my crack at the explanation with a 100-level knowledge of food science:

"Staling" reactions in beer consist of the breaking down of lipids into short-chain fatty acids that smell and taste rancid. These reactions are caused by free-radicals (in a runaway chain reaction) and oxygen. There was some study by Oregon State University that concluded that beer with live yeast had significantly more sulfite and antioxidants (which halt the runaway free-radical reaction).

As far as the difference between bottles w/ priming sugar and kegs w/ yeast sludge, who knows. Why don't you keg half a beer and bottle the other half and tell us which lasts longer? W00t experiment!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2009, 07:07 PM   #15
coyote
Recipes 
 
Feb 2007
Posts: 193

Quote:
Originally Posted by menschmaschine View Post
Even better is to filter out the yeast and add new yeast at bottling. This is what most Belgian breweries do.
what yeast do they use for bottling high gravity Belgians?

I have one that bulk aged for over a year. I primed and capped a few six packs about 5 weeks ago and no carbonation yet...temps still a little cool at about 65 F.

thanks.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2009, 07:10 PM   #16
menschmaschine
 
menschmaschine's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jun 2007
Delaware
Posts: 3,272
Liked 41 Times on 33 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by coyote View Post
what yeast do they use for bottling high gravity Belgians?

I have one that bulk aged for over a year. I primed and capped a few six packs about 5 weeks ago and no carbonation yet...temps still a little cool at about 65 F.

thanks.
Some of them crop yeast from primary for bottling, others use a different yeast. Any yeast with a high alcohol tolerance should work.
__________________
END TRANSMISSION

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2009, 07:14 PM   #17
SumnerH
Recipes 
 
Feb 2009
Alexandria, VA, USA
Posts: 2,057
Liked 31 Times on 27 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by coyote View Post
what yeast do they use for bottling high gravity Belgians?
Most Belgians bottle with the same yeast they brew with. Chimay, Rochefort, and Westmalle all do so (presumably Westvleteran and Achel do as well, but I'm not sure).

Orval adds additional bugs (and maybe another yeasting) to their bottles but doesn't filter out the regular yeast--you can culture up Orval dregs but you'll get a mix of the yeast and bugs. I dunno about de Koeningshaven.

Most of the commercial breweries would probably bottle with the same yeast they ferment with, since they have tons of yeast around and there's no point in maintaining another strain. I'm sure there are exceptions (mainly at places that already keep multiple fermentation strains around).
__________________
On deck: Little Bo Pils, Bretta Off Dead (Brett pale)
Secondary: Oude Bruin, Red Sky at Morning (Sour brown ale)
On tap: Saison Duphunk (sour), Amarillo Slim (IPA), Earl White (ginger/bergamot wit)
Bottled: Number 8 (Belgian Strong Dark Ale), Eternale (Barleywine), Ancho Villa (Ancho/pasilla/chocolate/cinnamon RIS), Oak smoked porter (1/2 maple bourbon oaked, 1/2 apple brandy oaked)

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2009, 10:42 PM   #18
coyote
Recipes 
 
Feb 2007
Posts: 193

appreciate the replies.

I guess I was just concerned with pitching yeast into such a toxic environment (OG=1.103, FG=1.014).

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2009, 12:44 AM   #19
menschmaschine
 
menschmaschine's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jun 2007
Delaware
Posts: 3,272
Liked 41 Times on 33 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by coyote View Post
appreciate the replies.

I guess I was just concerned with pitching yeast into such a toxic environment (OG=1.103, FG=1.014).
You could probably get away with something like Nottingham, which has an alcohol tolerance of 12-15%. If you really want to play it safe, you could pitch something like White Labs WLP099, which has an alcohol tolerance of over 15%.
__________________
END TRANSMISSION

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2009, 12:49 AM   #20
coyote
Recipes 
 
Feb 2007
Posts: 193

I have a package of Notty on hand! (for some reason, that doesn't sound good)

anyway...Thanks!

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bottle Conditioning vs Carboy Conditioning. What's the difference? BrewOnBoard Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 09-05-2015 09:54 PM
Bottle Conditioning vs. Carboy Conditioning Omahawk Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 08-15-2009 03:28 PM
Life of a CO2 bottle UncleMule Bottling/Kegging 2 03-29-2009 02:34 AM
Beer in bottle life? ChefyTim Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 3 05-13-2007 03:01 PM
cask conditioning vs bottle conditioning D*Bo Bottling/Kegging 6 07-05-2006 01:05 PM


Forum Jump