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Old 03-03-2009, 07:33 PM   #1
ohiobrewtus
 
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Nov 2006
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Recipe Type: All Grain   
Yeast: Wyeast 3725   
Yeast Starter: 2L   
Additional Yeast or Yeast Starter: none   
Batch Size (Gallons): 6   
Original Gravity: 1.088   
Final Gravity: 1.005   
IBU: 22.6   
Boiling Time (Minutes): 90   
Color: 14.5   
Primary Fermentation (# of Days & Temp): 14 @ 64   
Additional Fermentation: 10+ months at 64   
Secondary Fermentation (# of Days & Temp): 14 @ 64   
Tasting Notes: See below   

BeerSmith Recipe Printout - BeerSmith Brewing Software, Recipes, Blog, Wiki and Discussion Forum
Recipe: Dirty Monk Biere de Garde
Brewer: HopHed
Asst Brewer:
Style: Biere de Garde
TYPE: All Grain
Taste: (35.0)
Recipe Specifications
--------------------------
Batch Size: 5.50 gal
Boil Size: 7.78 gal
Estimated OG: 1.077 SG
Estimated Color: 14.5 SRM
Estimated IBU: 22.6 IBU
Brewhouse Efficiency: 75.00 %
Boil Time: 90 Minutes
Ingredients:
------------
Amount Item Type % or IBU
7.50 lb Pilsner (Briess) (2.0 SRM) Grain 50.85 %
3.00 lb Vienna Malt (3.5 SRM) Grain 20.34 %
0.75 lb Aromatic Malt (26.0 SRM) Grain 5.08 %
0.75 lb Caramel/Crystal Malt - 20L (20.0 SRM) Grain 5.08 %
0.75 lb Caravienne Malt (22.0 SRM) Grain 5.08 %
1.00 oz Hallertauer [6.00 %] (60 min) Hops 16.5 IBU
1.00 oz Tettnang [4.50 %] (15 min) Hops 6.1 IBU
1.00 lb Candi Sugar, Amber (75.0 SRM) Sugar 6.78 %
1.00 lb Cane (Beet) Sugar (0.0 SRM) Sugar 6.78 %
1 Pkgs Biere de Garde (Wyeast Labs #3725) [StarteYeast-Ale

Mash Schedule: Single Infusion, Light Body, No Mash Out
Total Grain Weight: 12.75 lb
----------------------------
Single Infusion, Light Body, No Mash Out
Step Time Name Description Step Temp
90 min Mash In Add 3.99 gal of water at 159.1 F 148.0 F
File Type: bsm biere de garde.bsm (13.8 KB, 385 views)
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Old 10-21-2010, 04:54 PM   #2
gifty74
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Mar 2009
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How did this turn out?

 
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Old 12-17-2010, 03:03 PM   #4
Oldsock
 
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Despite the name of the yeast it is apparently the Fantome strain. Not sure why they called it Biere de Garde, but we had the same experience super attenuative, and more yeast ester/phenol production than a Biere de Garde usually has.
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Old 03-11-2011, 06:00 PM   #5
GordonT
 
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Nov 2010
Victoria, BC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldsock View Post
Despite the name of the yeast it is apparently the Fantome strain. Not sure why they called it Biere de Garde, but we had the same experience super attenuative, and more yeast ester/phenol production than a Biere de Garde usually has.
I've never made a French Biere de Garde but I'm interested in giving it a shot. One thing I've wondered about is how they get that really funky, woody/leathery flavour into their farmhouse beers.
Is it due to the yeast? Cask conditioning? Seems more likely to me that it is a yeast characteristic.

Anyone have information or views on this?

 
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Old 03-25-2011, 03:46 PM   #6
emjay
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GordonT

I've never made a French Biere de Garde but I'm interested in giving it a shot. One thing I've wondered about is how they get that really funky, woody/leathery flavour into their farmhouse beers.
Is it due to the yeast? Cask conditioning? Seems more likely to me that it is a yeast characteristic.

Anyone have information or views on this?
Sounds like maybe a Brett infection which isn't typical for a modern bierr de garde. I have a feeling you're talking about cork taint though, which is definitely considered part of the style's character (but interestingly, always considered VERY bad in wine.)

I'd say that using corked bottles is absolutely essential to reproduce the style authentically - in my experience, much moreso than even the process of garding which is constantly stressed.

 
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Old 03-25-2011, 04:37 PM   #7
emjay
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldsock
Despite the name of the yeast it is apparently the Fantome strain. Not sure why they called it Biere de Garde, but we had the same experience super attenuative, and more yeast ester/phenol production than a Biere de Garde usually has.
This is very true, although Fantome hardly makes typical saisons... wildly creative for a Belgian saison producer. Intetestingly, Wyeast's "French Saison" strain, is conversely probably much closer to an actual BdG strain - it comes from Brasserie Thiriez in France, which is technically a BdG producer, though granted, even the author of Farmhouse Ales (Phil Markowski) admits it shares many characteristics of a saison.

I don't use Wyeast products much except for their nutrient though. You should be able to produce a fairly close BdG with a pretty neutral yeast strain, ale OR lager (lager yeasts being very commonly used), although ale yeasts are typically fermented cool, and lager yeasts quite warm. Of Wyeast's ale selection, you may want to give 1338, 2565, or 1007 (European Ale, Kolsch, and German Ale, respectively) a try, and preferably in that order, according to Markowski. Jamil Z ALSO recommends 1338, despite a hugely different grain bill, so I doubt you can go wrong with it.

My personal favorite though is White Labs WLP072 (French Ale), a platinum series strain only TYPICALLY available two months of the year, though homebrew stores can get limited (or even retired strains, I believe), if they can place a large enough order of it. Unfortunately, nobody seems to be able to confirm which brewery is the source of this strain, but there are pretty consistent rumors that it comes from Duyck, makers of Jenlain, pretty much the BdG against which all others are compared - though given this fact, the rumors are probably just born of speculation and/or wishful thinking since it IS the obvious guess. If it were any other brewery rumored, I'd be a bit more inclined to believe it. Regardless though, it produces a fantastic BdG that is authentic enough for me to definitely believe it comes from SOME sort of French BdG producer.

Not that it matters a ton though, as the customs and practices of BdG brewers often involve just borrowing yeast from much bigger breweries that are not even close to being artisanal farmhouse or craft breweries, which is why pretty much any fairly neutral yeast strain can do a pretty great job. Which makes me wonder what the hell Wyeast is even thinking, selling a saison yeast as "Biere de Garde", because saison yeasts, pretty much by necessity, produce FAR too much character to result in a beer approximating an actual BdG.

 
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Old 02-10-2012, 07:44 PM   #8
spenghali
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Jan 2009
Corvallis, OR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GordonT View Post
I've never made a French Biere de Garde but I'm interested in giving it a shot. One thing I've wondered about is how they get that really funky, woody/leathery flavour into their farmhouse beers.
Is it due to the yeast? Cask conditioning? Seems more likely to me that it is a yeast characteristic.

Anyone have information or views on this?
From BJCP:

"The “cellar” character in commercial examples is unlikely to be duplicated in homebrews as it comes from indigenous yeasts and molds. Commercial versions often have a “corked”, dry, astringent character that is often incorrectly identified as “cellar-like.” Homebrews therefore are usually cleaner. Base malts vary by beer color, but usually include pale, Vienna and Munich types. Kettle caramelization tends to be used more than crystal malts, when present. Darker versions will have richer malt complexity and sweetness from crystal-type malts. Sugar may be used to add flavor and aid in the dry finish. Lager or ale yeast fermented at cool ale temperatures, followed by long cold conditioning (4-6 weeks for commercial operations). Soft water. Floral, herbal or spicy continental hops."

 
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Old 02-10-2012, 07:46 PM   #9
spenghali
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Jan 2009
Corvallis, OR
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I am going to a tasting of Biere de Gardes today to prep for a Biere de Garde homebrew competition. Should be interesting since I have never even tasted this style before and have not clue how to formulate a recipe. Wish I had a copy of Farmhouse Ales. Anyone know some resources for traditional recipes?

 
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Old 02-16-2012, 07:43 PM   #10
nppeders
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May 2010
Minneapolis, Minnesota
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I'm about to brew this recipe as a 10 gallon split batch. 5 gallons will be fermented with Wyeast Belgian Shelde 3655 which I believe to be a De Konick strain of yeast. It sounds perfect for the style (lager like yet retaining the belgian characteristics). The other 5 gallons will go on top of a ECY02 Flemish Ale yeast cake to get nice and sour. I'm hoping it turns out to be similar to Jolly Pumpkins Bier de Garde.
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