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Old 03-01-2009, 11:57 PM   #1
RBChallenger
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Feb 2009
Tucson, AZ
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So I just obtained a 13 cu ft freezer (Frigidaire). It will hold 5 cornies and/or 1/6 barrels as well as a 10 lbs (possibly a 20 lb) bottle in the bottom. I plan to use a 5 way secondary regulator. One faucet will be dedicated to root beer and the other 4 will have a dedicated regulator, will I ever need 5 different pressures... I assume not, but I guess the ability is there. So here is my real question(s).

I will be using Perlick faucets and will be building a wooden coffin setup. I plan to use 5 foot runs of 5/16 beer hose. Any suggestions for keeping the lines and the faucets cold? I don't want to spend a fortune on this part of the setup but I am willing to spend some bucks on it. With that in mind, will I also be losing cold air out of the holes in the top for the coffin? Do you guys typically just put in some sort of grommet to seal the holes, just leave them open, cut a big hole and run PVC through it and run all beer lines through it, one hole per line... etc. I currently plan the back of the coffin to be completely open.

I am also tossing around the idea of fans. Do I need a fan on the bottom of my dolley as Jester369 did to pull air around the sides or will it be fine without it? Do I need some sort of fan on the inside to circulate air? Any particular temp controller you guys recommend (need one with two plugs if I will need the outside fan I suppose). If a muffin fan is needed inside are you guys wiring them in or finding them with plugs already attached.

I'm sure this wont be the end of my questions and I apologize for the lengthiness of the post. I appreciate any advice. Looking to get all the equipment in so I can get it all setup and out into the wood shop and working. Thanks!!!
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Primary 1: Watermelon Wheat Ale
Primary 2: Irish Red
Secondary 1: Alaskan Amber
Secondary 2: Air
Secondary 3: Air

Bottled: Foggy Haze Hefeweizen (ver 1.0)
Planned: Chocolate Mint Oatmeal Stout, EdWort's Apfelwein

 
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Old 03-02-2009, 12:03 AM   #2
IrregularPulse
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You will most likely come across problems with only 5 ft of line. There are calculators in the kegging section of the forum to determine line length based off desired temp and carbonation levels. But a good general setup is 3/16 ID Lines at 10ft.
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Old 03-02-2009, 12:09 AM   #3
StunnedMonkey
 
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+1 on the beer line caution. 5/16 is too big, and 5 ft is too short. That will cause you nothing but trouble. IrregularPulse is correct...start with 10 ft of 3/16 and go from there. It's much easier to cut a long line shorter than to have to replace a line that is too short. FWIW, I use 10 ft of 3/16 and it's just about perfect for me.
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Old 03-02-2009, 12:10 AM   #4
bendavanza
 
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I would start with 8 (or ten) foot runs of 3/16" beer line. You will have nothing but foam with 5/16". If you start with 8' you can cut off a foot at at time if the flow is too slow. It has been proven to be preferred on the slow side unless you are in a busy bar situation. The soda, which is usually around 30-35 psi, will need more length, I'd do a search but I think I remember 15 foot to be the length. There are some tricks to add restriction other ways like using 1/8" ID line on the inside of kegs, and also some mixing tubes, which you can search for.
You want your coffin to be sealed, with the exception of course being the tower that feeds it. Leave enough room for a 1" hose to blow cold air up there to cool the faucets and lines. It will return back around the lines. This helps circulate air in the freezer as well. You'll need some sort of trap door in the coffin to access the shanks etc. for maintenance. Insulate the coffin as best you can, the foam panels work well. Check out the show us your kegerator thread to see all kinds of innovative ideas.

 
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Old 03-02-2009, 04:15 AM   #5
RBChallenger
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Feb 2009
Tucson, AZ
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Thanks for the feedback, I intended to say 3/16" beer line... I was looking at the 5/16" air line as I was typing this. In the mean time I also did some more searching and came across this thread: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f51/kege...106-2-a-38905/. This seems like a good idea as well. It actually seems like one could run a fan as well as the copper tubing correct? I like my beer cold so I am intending to run the temperature controller at 40 degrees.

Thanks for the hints on the 10' line versus the 5'. Any other suggestions?
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Regards,
Rich

Primary 1: Watermelon Wheat Ale
Primary 2: Irish Red
Secondary 1: Alaskan Amber
Secondary 2: Air
Secondary 3: Air

Bottled: Foggy Haze Hefeweizen (ver 1.0)
Planned: Chocolate Mint Oatmeal Stout, EdWort's Apfelwein

 
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