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Old 02-24-2009, 03:57 AM   #11
thdewitt
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Thanks everyone for the help. So in working with Palmers Spreadsheet and distilled water I come up with the following additions for 10 gallons of water. Epsom Salt .7 gm, Calcium Chloride .4 gm, Baking Soda .3 gm, Chalk .4 gm. With that the water would be:
CA 7.1, MG 2, Na 2.2, S04 7.2, Cl 5.1, and HC03 12. This is very close to Pilsen water. My problem now. Those are pretty small amounts. I need a much better scale. Does that small of an amount really make a difference. It seems like RO water would have at least this much without additions.

Yes, I am an all grain brewer. Now with the 10 gallons I can use some for the mash and some for the sparge. Do you need to treat the sparge water. I think you would as it will ultimately be in the boil and the sulfate/chloride ratio seems to affect the malty/bitter taste perception.


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Old 02-24-2009, 04:47 AM   #12
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Just stumbled on this post and thought I would toss in what I know. I am a nuc machinist's mate on a sub and I can definitely attest that DI water is the purest you can get. RO is good but as stated earlier you end up with some dissolved solids as the membranes are not 100% efficient. Distilled is from flash evaporators or low vacuum systems. The inherent drawback to these systems is that with low vacuum, you get high velocity steam up into the upper distillate cooler. Invariably you end up with some "carryover". Where I work at, we take our distillate from our evaporators (distilled water) and run them through cation/anion exchangers (de-ionized water). Once through those we end up with <0.1 ppm of anything (we look for Chlorides).

So in a nutshell from not so pure to pure:
Reverse Osmosis/Distilling
De-ionized water

Sorry for the techno-babble.

Rob


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Old 12-17-2012, 03:54 PM   #13
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This makes sense to me, I used to work in a lab and we used to deionize our water after it was distilled, which implies that you can get some ions carried over when distilling. However, on a theoretical level at least, I would think you could very carefully distill and have no carryover.
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Old 05-21-2014, 03:32 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobBug View Post
Just stumbled on this post and thought I would toss in what I know. I am a nuc machinist's mate on a sub and I can definitely attest that DI water is the purest you can get. RO is good but as stated earlier you end up with some dissolved solids as the membranes are not 100% efficient. Distilled is from flash evaporators or low vacuum systems. The inherent drawback to these systems is that with low vacuum, you get high velocity steam up into the upper distillate cooler. Invariably you end up with some "carryover". Where I work at, we take our distillate from our evaporators (distilled water) and run them through cation/anion exchangers (de-ionized water). Once through those we end up with <0.1 ppm of anything (we look for Chlorides).

So in a nutshell from not so pure to pure:
Reverse Osmosis/Distilling
De-ionized water

Sorry for the techno-babble.

Rob

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Old 05-22-2014, 01:08 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Schlenkerla View Post
Just what you said removing calcium for sodium. I was thinking the sodium is higher, more than naturally occurring in the Czech water.
That's pretty accurate for where I am. I have soft tap water and brew Pilsners often. They tend to turn out very well for me. This is my water profile, with the numbers for Pilsen in parenthesis:

Ca: 4 (7)
Mg: 0.8 (2)
Na: 31.8 (2)
SO4: 6.4 (8)
Cl: 23.9 (6)
BiCarb: 38.9 (16)


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