Coldbreak Brewing Giveaway - Open to All!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > DIY Projects > Brew Stands > 500 watt or other low watt elements
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-21-2009, 04:50 AM   #1
JVD_X
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 4 reviews
 
JVD_X's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Gainesville, Virginia
Posts: 1,492
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default 500 watt or other low watt elements

Does anyone know where to get very low wattage heater elements?


__________________
- JVD_X
JVD_X is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2009, 05:04 AM   #2
brewmasterpa
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: orange, ca
Posts: 797
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

im not sure you can find a low watt element. what most people do is install a 110 volt high watt element onto a 220 volt circuit and run a pulse width generator to it to vary the output from the 220 to about 60-65 percent allowing for a low wattage step-in without destroying your 110 volt element.


__________________
ill keep my money, guns, freedom, and religion......you can keep the change.

You like fishsticks, what are you, a gay fish?
brewmasterpa is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2009, 06:18 AM   #3
ClaudiusB
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: El Paso, Texas
Posts: 1,307
Liked 68 Times on 58 Posts
Likes Given: 128

Default

Quote:
Does anyone know where to get very low wattage heater elements?
Chromalox is one of many suppliers


Just some info:
If you connect any 240 V heater element to a 120 V circuit your effective wattage is 1/4.

2000 W, 240 V element = 500 W if connected to 120 V

Cheers,
ClaudiusB
ClaudiusB is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2009, 01:29 PM   #4
Bobby_M
Vendor and Brewer
HBT_SPONSOR.png
Vendor Ads 
Feedback Score: 3 reviews
 
Bobby_M's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Whitehouse Station, NJ
Posts: 22,703
Liked 1266 Times on 835 Posts
Likes Given: 34

Default

I might have one laying around that will get you 500w. How short does it have to be?
__________________
Welcome to BrewHardware.com. I love you.
New 100% Stainless Steel Heating Elements are IN! ULWD 5500w Ripple, 2000w, 1500w, etc
Chugger Pumps, Pump Kits, Camlocks, Sightglasses, Clear USA made Silicone Tubing, RIMS, Electric Install Parts, etc.
July 4th Sale, $20 off plate chillers through July 4th.
Bobby_M is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2009, 01:34 PM   #5
Orfy
For the love of beer!
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Orfy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Cheshire, England
Posts: 11,853
Liked 76 Times on 56 Posts
Likes Given: 30

Default

What do you want to use it for?
__________________
GET THE GOBLIN
Have a beer on me.
Orfy is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2009, 04:34 PM   #6
JVD_X
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 4 reviews
 
JVD_X's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Gainesville, Virginia
Posts: 1,492
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

I have a super secret shark-laser project underway! So I can't tell yet... in case it's a complete disaster - which might end up being the case. I have an unreputation I need to keep intact. I definately will look into the 240 volt element.... good idea. However I though t it would be 1/2 not 1/4 of the power.

The element needs to be very very low-density...like maybe 25 watts per square inch.

OK - I will tell you...

http://www.arttec.net/Solar/10-9/Oct9.html

But instead I am using an old dc to ac power inverter I have laying around to drive the solar rims system.
__________________
- JVD_X
JVD_X is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2009, 10:08 PM   #7
ClaudiusB
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: El Paso, Texas
Posts: 1,307
Liked 68 Times on 58 Posts
Likes Given: 128

Default

Quote:
However I though t it would be 1/2 not 1/4 of the power.
No, P=E/R or P= I*E, E= Element voltage, R= Element resistance
We don't know the resistance of the element or the current.
The formula for the resistance is: R= E/I
The formula for the current is: I=P/E
Let's calculate the current:

P=2000W, E= 240 V
I= P/E, 2000/240= 8.333 Amps

Let's calculate the resistance:
R= 240/8.333= 28.80 Ohms (Element resitance)

Now if we use the 2000 W, 240 V element with 120 V we get :
P= E/R, 120= 14400/28.80= 500 W



Cheers,
ClaudiusB


ClaudiusB is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Best controller for a 4500 Watt Element hayabusa Brew Stands 26 03-25-2009 10:28 PM
control for 4500 watt element brewjunky Equipment/Sanitation 2 06-01-2008 03:05 AM
5500 watt element Brewpastor Equipment/Sanitation 18 03-20-2007 04:35 PM
MBA in Brewing and Distilling (Heriot Watt) Yuri_Rage General Beer Discussion 4 09-28-2006 04:42 AM
1500 Watt Hotplate akira7799 Equipment/Sanitation 7 12-13-2005 06:01 AM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS