What would be a good dry yeast for a Milk Stout? - Home Brew Forums
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Old 02-17-2009, 01:34 AM   #1
snailsongs
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Here's my recipe, borrowed and modified form Jamil' Z (I'm going to add a few bourbon soaked oak-chips to half the batch):

two questions:

what would be a good dry yeast for this beer?

Would it be better to mash at a moderately high temp to keep a bit of sweetness (like 154-155F)

Amount Item Type % or IBU
10.00 lb Pale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM) Grain 80.0 %
1.00 lb Black (Patent) Malt (500.0 SRM) Grain 8.0 %
0.75 lb Caramel/Crystal Malt - 80L (80.0 SRM) Grain 6.0 %
0.50 lb Chocolate Malt (350.0 SRM) Grain 4.0 %
0.25 lb Roasted Barley (300.0 SRM) Grain 2.0 %
1.50 oz Goldings, East Kent [5.00%] (60 min) Hops 25.1 IBU
1.00 lb Milk Sugar (Lactose) (0.0 SRM) Sugar 0.0 %


Est Original Gravity: 1.061 SG
Measured Original Gravity: 1.010 SG
Est Final Gravity: 1.016 SG Measured Final Gravity: 1.005 SG
Estimated Alcohol by Vol: 5.9 % Actual Alcohol by Vol: 0.6 %
Bitterness: 25.1 IBU Calories: 43 cal/pint
Est Color: 49.7 SRM Color: Color


thanks!



 
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Old 02-17-2009, 03:03 AM   #2
Kayos
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I think a liquid is best for this recipe, but if dry, go Nottinghams or US-04.
Yes, mash at 155 or 156. YUMMY!!!


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Old 02-17-2009, 03:08 AM   #3
Yuri_Rage
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I completely disagree that liquid is best for a sweet stout. Go with S-04.
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Old 02-17-2009, 03:18 AM   #4
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This might even be a grain bill that I would almost consider using Windsor instead of S-04.

I'd mash lower with Windsor that S-04 though...
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Old 02-17-2009, 04:40 AM   #5
Kayos
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuri_Rage View Post
I completely disagree that liquid is best for a sweet stout. Go with S-04.
When Yuri disagrees with me -- DO WHAT HE SAYS AND IGNORE ME! He is wayyyyyyyy more savvy to the brew world than me.
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Old 02-17-2009, 07:33 AM   #6
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S-04 goes in my sweet stout. Not looking for a whole lot of out of the yeast here. Except to attenuate to a certain percentage. Let the malt shine!

 
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Old 02-17-2009, 01:33 PM   #7
Bob
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S-04 would work. I think I disagree with using an even- or under-attenuating yeast, though. Follow my logic.

If you're already mashing high, you're providing plenty of dextrins. Then you're adding a full pound of unfermentable sugar in the lactose. Then you're going to use an under-attenuating yeast.

That's not a sequence that gives me confidence you'll end up with beer; that's a recipe for syrup. Might go really well on pancakes, but in a pint glass? I dunno!

I kid, I kid - but only half.

I think I'd use a neutral, solid attenuator like Nottingham or even US-05 for this beer. Get every last fermentable molecule accounted for, to let the dextrins and lactose shine through. YMMV.

One other thought: Are you seriously using more Black Patent than roasted barley? That's a whole crap-ton of Black Patent, more than I'd ever advise anyone to use in a 5-gallon grist of any type. I'd drop the BP entirely, kick the Roasted Barley up to a full pound, and leave the Chocolate where it is. Leave the Black Patent where it is, and you'll end up with a black beer that'll take years to mellow.

That's my tuppence ha'penny!

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Old 02-17-2009, 01:41 PM   #8
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I made that exact same recipe (Jamil's) back in December and used S-04. It came out great. I also mashed at 151F. My FG was right where I wanted it: 1.023. I find that S-04 is not as low of an attenuating yeast as some people think (not to the extent of some of the other English yeasts). It will ferment beers fairly dry and even more so if you can ramp the temp up a bit at the end of fermentation.

Anyway, I think S-04 is a great choice, I like it in (almost) all the darker English style beers I make. It is also great because this yeast will drop hard and fast leaving you a crystal clear (if you can see through it) beer in matter of a couple weeks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NQ3X View Post
One other thought: Are you seriously using more Black Patent than roasted barley? That's a whole crap-ton of Black Patent, more than I'd ever advise anyone to use in a 5-gallon grist of any type. I'd drop the BP entirely, kick the Roasted Barley up to a full pound, and leave the Chocolate where it is. Leave the Black Patent where it is, and you'll end up with a black beer that'll take years to mellow.
I was also skeptical when I saw it to begin with. But, when I brew a style for the first time I try to brew it as written and indeed this beer came out great. I have compared it with some of the classic examples of this style and it stacks pretty well. Yeah, it was a bit harsh for a couple weeks after brewing but that BP character dropped off fast.


 
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Old 02-17-2009, 01:42 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmb View Post
This might even be a grain bill that I would almost consider using Windsor instead of S-04.

I'd mash lower with Windsor that S-04 though...
This, Nottingham would go far too dry. I recently did a cream stout with S-04, mashed at 159 and put 1lb of lactose in ten gallons and it finished at 1.022...it's really fantastic.

 
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Old 02-17-2009, 02:41 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuri_Rage View Post
I completely disagree that liquid is best for a sweet stout. Go with S-04.

It's what I use
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f68/dark...t-stout-55233/



 
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