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Old 02-05-2009, 09:01 PM   #11
CBBaron
 
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Making an Ale without boiling makes alot of sense for those times. The hot water was necessary to convert the starches in the malt to sugars for the ferment but boiling would not be necessary unless you were adding hops. Since hops were not used in ancient times boiling the wort was not necessary. I imagine brewers found they could produce a better quality ale with boiling, but that would have added time and expense to the beer, so cheap stuff may have been made without boiling.

It might be an interesting experiment to see what the result is. I would not expect any thing like the flavor or quality we currently expect in beer. Cloudy, sour and unbalanced come to mind.

Craig

 
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Old 02-05-2009, 09:09 PM   #12

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Originally Posted by CBBaron View Post
It might be an interesting experiment to see what the result is. I would not expect any thing like the flavor or quality we currently expect in beer. Cloudy, sour and unbalanced come to mind.
I'm an adventurous lad, both in my brewing and in my drinking. As far as taste, the only one I know who can speak with authority from first-hand experience is NQ3X; I believe he's out of town for the next several days so an answer may be delayed.

Jason

 
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Old 02-06-2009, 05:35 PM   #13

Update: Thanks to Ed's lightening fast packing job and prompt shipping (ordered yesterday, expected arrival tomorrow), looks like my little experiment will be underway on the weekend.



 
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Old 02-06-2009, 06:30 PM   #14
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awesome. so are you going to boil for 30 minutes like the recipe you created states? and what are you mashing in? i'd imagine with such a large proportion of wheat and oats you'll have trouble sticking.
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Old 02-06-2009, 06:34 PM   #15

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awesome. so are you going to boil for 30 minutes like the recipe you created states? and what are you mashing in? i'd imagine with such a large proportion of wheat and oats you'll have trouble sticking.
I do plan on boiling for thirty minutes, more for clarity than for fear of any buggies.

As far as the mash, I may just do BIAB on my stovetop to KISS.

 
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Old 02-13-2009, 06:23 PM   #16

Brewed yesterday, pitched US-04. Stay tuned for tasting in about a week.

 
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Old 02-13-2009, 07:17 PM   #17
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when you bottle - don't add any sugar. I've read they didn't carbonate the stuff back then; and drink it at room temperature for an authentic (= gross) experience

 
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Old 02-13-2009, 07:22 PM   #18
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I've been seriously thinking about doing a 2-3 gal, full decoction, no sparge beer. I'd mash like normal (maybe a little thin, and probably mash hop) and then, making sure the pH is good, just boil the whole thing for say 20 min. adding more hops to taste, then vorlauf, and drain to the fermenter.

If your experiment turns out well that'll help nudge me to do this. I've got a list of experimental beers I want to do that I need a little nudging on. The nice thing about this is the time savings.
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Old 02-13-2009, 07:28 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CBBaron View Post
Making an Ale without boiling makes alot of sense for those times. The hot water was necessary to convert the starches in the malt to sugars for the ferment but boiling would not be necessary unless you were adding hops. Since hops were not used in ancient times boiling the wort was not necessary. I imagine brewers found they could produce a better quality ale with boiling, but that would have added time and expense to the beer, so cheap stuff may have been made without boiling.

Craig
It is not just about the hops, however.

Drinking beer rather than water back then makes a ton of sense because it was boiled. Water in those times was usually contaminated and led to lots of sickness. People drank beer all day long (weak beer) because it was actually safer to consume than the water. Boiling killed those organisms that infected the water.

 
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Old 02-13-2009, 07:40 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZ_IPA View Post
when you bottle - don't add any sugar. I've read they didn't carbonate the stuff back then; and drink it at room temperature for an authentic (= gross) experience
What do you have against warm uncarbonated beer? I always enjoy the last half pint in the bottling bucket or a taste when checking the hydrometer readings. Now I do prefer the beer slightly cooler than my 60F basement temp and with a little carbonation, but its quite good without it. Ofcourse I don't make Blonde ales or light lagers where ice cold and spritzy is expected.

I think a very low carbonation and warm serving temp would be very appropriate for this beer. Get your self some mini-kegs and serve this as a cask ale would probably be best.

Craig

 
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