Bottle conditioning experiment - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Bottle conditioning experiment

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-29-2009, 02:08 AM   #1
kendrid
Recipes 
 
Jan 2009
Posts: 76


While this is an "I told you so" type of story, here it is few the new guys.

I brewed the MW extract Autumn Amber Ale kit on 1/2 and bottled it two weeks later on 1/17.

One case of beer went into my daughter's bedroom closet which is in the low 70s (probably 70) while the other was in my basement which is 60.

Tonight I had my first two homebrews ever. The first was from the closet and it was really good. I know it isn't done by any means but I was anxious to try it. It was very nicely carbonated, had a smooth taste and nice smell. I was happy.

The second beer from the basement would have been a huge disappointment if I didn't know what was going on. While it was carbonated it is very sweet and clearly a "green" beer.

So listen up new guys, the temperature at which you bottle condition matters a lot. I am putting both cases into the closet until 2/7 where they will then be three weeks old. At that time I will pull out 8 or so that have always been in the closet and chill them and try again. At that point I figure they should be great since they are good now.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 03:23 AM   #2
ChickenSoop
Recipes 
 
Dec 2008
Winnipeg
Posts: 190
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts


Absolutley. From now on, I am not touching my beer until 4 weeks after bottling. It's ok after 3, but I can taste a hint of green. I'll try to hold out until 4 weeks, maybe longer once I have a few more batches completed. The anticipation is tough on your first batch.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 05:17 AM   #3
kendrid
Recipes 
 
Jan 2009
Posts: 76

I do have a follow up question: how long do I need to keep the bottles at 70 degrees? I have a pale ale that I'm letting sit on the primary for 3-4 weeks which puts me at bottling in two weeks. I can't take up all of the closet space in the house...

After the pale ale is bottled I will be getting batch three going. While I don't drink that much I want to have a decent supply "well done" so I won't want to break into young beer.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 05:50 AM   #4
JMSetzler
Recipes 
 
Dec 2008
Hickory, North Carolina
Posts: 901
Liked 15 Times on 15 Posts


Time is probably more of a factor than a 10 degree temperature variation. Most bottle conditioning gets even better after 5-8 weeks in the bottle. The temperature difference wouldn't be that significant over the longer period of time...
__________________
Beer Before Noon - My Beer and Homebrewing Adventures

Kamado Joe Cooking Channel - Grillin' up a Storm!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 04:20 PM   #5
kendrid
Recipes 
 
Jan 2009
Posts: 76

I'd think if the ten degrees made a difference for the first two weeks it would continue to for a while.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 04:58 PM   #6
snailsongs
Recipes 
 
Dec 2008
Eugene, OR
Posts: 677
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by ChickenSoop View Post
The anticipation is tough on your first batch.
Actually, I'm on my 9th and 10th batches, and the anticipation is just as tough....
.....all-hail pipe-lining....

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 05:22 PM   #7
JMSetzler
Recipes 
 
Dec 2008
Hickory, North Carolina
Posts: 901
Liked 15 Times on 15 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by kendrid View Post
I'd think if the ten degrees made a difference for the first two weeks it would continue to for a while.
It won't in terms of carbonation. The flavor of the beer will continue to develop.
__________________
Beer Before Noon - My Beer and Homebrewing Adventures

Kamado Joe Cooking Channel - Grillin' up a Storm!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 06:29 PM   #8
Grinder12000
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
Grinder12000's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jul 2008
Columbus WI
Posts: 2,995
Liked 41 Times on 34 Posts


I have an unfinished basement with an unfinished bathroom. I put a blanket over the door and purchased a heater with a thermostat set at 70.

My last 7 batches that I have put in there are fully carbed in 1 week. Yea - green but I no longer worry about carbonation.

After 3 weeks they are transferred to the rest of the 55 degree basement for further aging/drinking.


all-hail pipe-lining.
__________________
Grinders Island Brewery - Pipeline

145 batches and counting

West Coast Blaster #4 almost go and on tap and a Dbl Chocolate Stout aging/carbing. Brewing East India Porter #4

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 06:59 PM   #9
SeamusMac
Recipes 
 
Jan 2009
Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 614
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts


I live in an apartment and for better or worse my apartment is on the south side of the building. Even during the winter there isn't a single place in my apartment that is below 72*F if the thermostat for the apartment is set at 72*F, which is kind of inconvenient because once I've conditioned my beer to my satisfaction I don't have a nice cool basement to store it in.

Here's a n00b question, should I be concerned about letting my beer condition past perhaps 2 months in such conditions?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2009, 07:23 PM   #10
Dennis1979
Recipes 
 
Sep 2008
Houston, Texas
Posts: 152

kendrid,

4 weeks from brew to drinking is awful fast. I'm still very much a noob but I have learned that it pays to wait. My first batch I did everything too fast and the beer quality suffered. I am now leaving the beer in the primary for 3 -4 weeks. I am not even checking the gravity before 3 weeks. I'm using a secondary for cleaning up so I don't bottle until 4 or 5 weeks after brew day. Then bottle and in the closet for 6 weeks. I recently did a brown ale and a dutch style ale (Heinekin/Grolsch sort of). At 6 weeks both were good but the brown ale was a little sweet. So I waited 2 more weeks on it. At 8 weeks I tried the brown ale again and it was fantastic. Those 2 weeks, from 6 to 8, made a huge difference. I am only taking a few bottles out of the closet at a time and I notice that every week the flavor improves. So the point is, give it time. I know it is hard but it really pays off. If you test your beer too early you get disappointed and start thinking you did something wrong. Keep your brew schedule going and at some point in the future you can start drinking your beer and as long as the pipeline stays full you won't have any problem waiting for the beer to fully mature.

Dennis
__________________
Let me eat when I'm hungry, let me drink when I'm dry
Two dollars when I'm hard up, religion when I die
The whole world is a bottle, and life is but a dram
When the bottle gets empty, Lord, it sure ain't worth a damn

 
Reply With Quote


Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bottle Conditioning vs Carboy Conditioning. What's the difference? BrewOnBoard Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 09-05-2015 09:54 PM
Bottle Conditioning vs. Carboy Conditioning Omahawk Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 08-15-2009 03:28 PM
Conditioning and aging experiment Hammy71 Bottling/Kegging 2 05-24-2009 08:48 PM
Gelatins Effect on Bottle Conditioning (An Experiment) BierMuncher Bottling/Kegging 20 03-26-2008 04:31 PM
cask conditioning vs bottle conditioning D*Bo Bottling/Kegging 6 07-05-2006 01:05 PM


Forum Jump