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ChiechiBrouw

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Join Date:

04-20-2011

Last Activity:

07-01-2014 11:44 PM

2 Likes on 2 Posts 

    ABOUT ME

  • Chemistry Professor
  • Ryan Chiechi
  • I started in Boston a few years back, out of curiosity, and was shocked at how good homemade beer could be. I'm a chemistry professor by day, and I love DIY projects, so the hobby really resonated with me. I've since moved to Holland, where Belgian beers flow like water, but where American ales are few and far between. Thus, I've spent the last few years brewing clones of my favorite brews from the US.
  • Some day I would like to successfully clone Southern Tier's Crme Brle Imperial Milk Stout... My first attempt stopped around 1.040 and never carbonated in the bottle.
  • Air.
  • "Mojo Porter" a dry-hopped porter with many substituted ingredients (forgot to check inventory before brew day!)
  • A failed attempt to clone creme brulee stout that I keep hoping will magically become better with aging (seven months and counting...)
  • "Spiegel Pond Pale Ale," My attempt at Mirror Pond Pale Ale.
  • Male
  • Married
  • Groningen
  • the Netherlands

LATEST ACTIVITY

  • Posted in thread: Diving into Water Chemistry for a Perfect Pale Ale on 07-02-2014 at 05:43 AM
    I realize that carbonate/bicarbonate is the most predominate base at any alkaline pH in most
    drinking water (the pronation state is not consequential). Still, I don't conflating
    alkalinity, pH, and ca...

  • Posted in thread: A Brewing Water Chemistry Primer on 07-01-2014 at 06:18 AM
    ^^^^^^90% of my beers are IPA/APA's so where should the water numbers be to best utilize the
    hops?Sent from my NSA monitored iPhone.There is a tension between utilization and flavor. Alpha
    acids are m...

  • Posted in thread: Diving into Water Chemistry for a Perfect Pale Ale on 07-01-2014 at 05:59 AM
    Thanks for the answer, but I don't think I asked my question clearly...I don't like using total
    alkalinity and carbonate concentration interchangeably because it assumes that you are starting
    with nat...

  • Posted in thread: Diving into Water Chemistry for a Perfect Pale Ale on 06-29-2014 at 07:55 AM
    I got myself a good pH meter and some phosphoric acid and brewed up an IPA with 100% Mosaic
    hops. It's currently on tap and it's delicious! The bitterness so perfectly balances the
    sweetness that neit...

  • Posted in thread: Diving into Water Chemistry for a Perfect Pale Ale on 04-30-2014 at 06:23 AM
    This is a CLASSIC indication of different water profiles and their impact on the final product.
    Did you ever wonder why Ireland is famous for their stouts and Pilsen is famous for their pale
    beers? It...

  • Posted in thread: Diving into Water Chemistry for a Perfect Pale Ale on 04-29-2014 at 03:43 PM
    After reading the advice from you-all and doing some background reading, I've decided to use
    Bru'n Water to adjust my mash/sparge pH and to pay closer attention to the sulfate
    concentration. Apparentl...

  • Posted in thread: Grain Mill or Wort Pump? on 04-29-2014 at 11:59 AM
    A grain mill was one of the best investments I ever made. I can buy bulk grains, my brew
    process is way more reproducible, and fresh-crushed grains smell awesome first thing in the
    morning.As for movi...

  • Posted in thread: Is it worth it to buy bulk grains? on 04-29-2014 at 11:50 AM
    I have no LHBS, so I buy all my base malts in 25 kg sacks. I just stick them in a cabinet right
    in the sack they came in. Brewing about once a month (20 L) I've never had a problem. Ikea
    sells really ...

  • Posted in thread: Diving into Water Chemistry for a Perfect Pale Ale on 04-29-2014 at 11:29 AM
    With respect to the "crisp" hop flavor and mild bitterness, you may also consider using a
    smaller charge of a clean bittering hop like magnum or warrrior, a bigger percentage of
    late-addition hops, an...

  • Posted in thread: Diving into Water Chemistry for a Perfect Pale Ale on 04-29-2014 at 06:02 AM
    If the beers are coming out darker than expected, that is a classic sign of higher than desired
    mash pH. The higher pH does extract more color from the grist. The carbonate level does suggest
    that tho...

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