ajdelange

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Join Date:

08-06-2010

Last Activity:

12-10-2016 9:59 PM

Likes Given: 43

1499 Likes on 1145 Posts 

    ABOUT ME

  • Retired
  • Baroque, early Classical
  • BURP, AHA, ASBC, MBAA
  • Male
  • Married
  • McLean/Ogden
  • Virginia/Quebec

LATEST ACTIVITY

  • Posted in thread: House Lights, Electric Heat, Winter, and Entropy on 12-09-2016 at 09:29 PM
    How many Led lights would I need to fit in a tin can to heat my primary in my fermenting
    chamber to 68 degrees in a 45 degree room for 2 weeks?That would depend on whether you put the
    series current l...

  • Posted in thread: House Lights, Electric Heat, Winter, and Entropy on 12-09-2016 at 09:26 PM
    Well, to look at at in one way, all energy is a type of radiation, it depends on where it is in
    the spectrum.The kinetic energy of a speeding bullet is not a form of radiation.The
    gravitational potent...

  • Posted in thread: House Lights, Electric Heat, Winter, and Entropy on 12-09-2016 at 02:54 PM
    Replace all your bulbs with infrared bulbs and get even more heat! (And a cool new ambiance
    too!)If fact you wouldn't. If a device draws 100 watts (not 100 volt-amperes; 100 real watts)
    it will delive...

  • Posted in thread: House Lights, Electric Heat, Winter, and Entropy on 12-09-2016 at 02:22 PM
    Opening the fridge will warm your house. True!Back in the days when a STU was a half rack of
    equipment we put one in a small room that was not tied into the building's HVAC system. When
    you turned the...

  • Posted in thread: Conducting a pre mash PH check on 12-08-2016 at 11:34 PM
    How's your calculus? a1 is the slope of the curve at pHdi. Draw the line tangent to the curve
    at pHdi and extend it till it hits the axes (if you can). The change in mEq per unit change in
    pH is a1.Th...

  • Posted in thread: Ideal PH for each style on 12-08-2016 at 06:18 PM
    Recommended by whom? There are many that will tell you that stouts should be mashed at the
    higher end of the pH range. I don't agree. Are you going to accept my recommendation because I
    have a lot of ...

  • Posted in thread: EZ Water Calculator issue on 12-08-2016 at 12:33 PM
    Something is definitely amiss here. Spreadsheets can get screwed up if cells with formulas
    aren't protected but the usual result of such is a completely unreasonable answer. I guess you
    could try down...

  • Posted in thread: Conducting a pre mash PH check on 12-08-2016 at 04:29 AM
    That set of slides is a good place to be looking for fuller understanding of all this.There are
    two things going on here that I have glossed over in the previous discussions here. First is
    that the ac...

  • Posted in thread: Conducting a pre mash PH check on 12-07-2016 at 04:29 PM
    With that said, it will be much appreciated if it were possible for you to explain the
    differences in accuracy between the two approaches. When calculating pH measurement by entering
    the test mash DI ...

  • Posted in thread: Zymit Enzymatic Cleaner - Dilute w/ Tap Water? on 12-07-2016 at 04:13 PM
    It is usually sufficient (and very important) that you thoroughly rinse off buffers while
    calibrating and sample when measuring so that one buffer doesn't contaminate the other, so that
    a buffer doesn...

1 COMMENTS
Posted: 
February 8, 2014  •  08:08 AM
Yeast starters generally need to be stepped up to a size appropriate for 10 gal batch pitching. But I've been researching the reason for this. It seems to me, that if the yeast needs can be anticipated and met for the whole starter size, then this step-up procedure could be eliminated. The most obvious delta (to me) across the fermentation is pH. Internally, yeast maintain pH at 5.0-5.8. Dissolved CO2, excreted acids, and cell H+ transport continously increase H+ concentration, decreasing pH. There needs to be a pH delta across the cell wall for maltose influx. So this is why yeast act to decrease pH in external medium. But they don't appear to be able to shut that process off (at least, completely) and so can acidify mediums that aren't well buffered right down and out of their operating window. Looks like best pH is mid-4's to 5.0 or so. Now, pitching a starter with too little yeast means that they can't quickly acidify the wort down to optimum pH levels. And then, even if they can, such a large amount of growth causes over-acidificaiton and floccing before full attenuation. Since this is a starter and we intend to decant the 'beer' before pitching, can't we introduce a buffer into the wort before fermentation? The buffer would hold pH around 4.5-5.0. The yeast would be presented with optimum pH from start to finish, ensuring full attenuation with any size starter, with any size innoculation. What think ye? Any recommendations for acid-salt-alkaline combinations for buffers?
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