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Old 02-04-2009, 10:11 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by jonp9576 View Post
so how long are we talking for the line. 10 foot is way too short. is 20 enough?
I used about 30 feet for soda, carbed at about 30 psi, maybe a bit more. I don't remember exactly.

I bought the line from Mcmaster Carr (found it here in a thread about not having plastic taste in the line) and it was about $.15/per foot, I think.
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Old 02-04-2009, 10:39 PM   #22
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wow, 30 feet just seems like to much line

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Old 02-05-2009, 01:51 AM   #23
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I'm pretty happy using a standard 6' beer line for ROOT BEER - 20psi tastes/feels pretty good to me.
Maltodextrin would be my addition to the faq - really helps out the mouthfeel of the rootbeer.
I'm only on my second keg, sasparilla tastes better than rootbeer to me, birch will be the next keg.

-OCD

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Old 02-05-2009, 12:10 PM   #24
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The Carbonator Cap works great if you are really serious about soda and you do not want to use up a keg for water.

Also restaurant supply places carry snow cone syrups that have directions for making soda on them. Not all restaurant supply houses require you to have a business. GFS market place has many locations and you can just walk right in.
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Old 02-05-2009, 05:14 PM   #25
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Default DIY carb cap

i make my own

take 1 regular plastic 2L bottle cap (same size as reg 12 and 20oz bottles)
drill hole in center making sure you dont ruin the blue cap gasket
trim rubber gaskets from mag wheel tire stem so they are both flat
insert stainless mag wheel tire stem with one gasket on top
screw down using supplied nut

voila

the nice part is that it can be used to fill co2, check bottle pressure with a regular tire gauge, and can be completely taken apart and serviced (valve stems etc.)

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Old 08-31-2009, 10:55 AM   #26
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I've been lurking around this forum for about 3 months now, never signed up and posted something until today.

to pitch my 2 cents (or a dime) on the Soda Talk, some things i've learned:

If you can afford to force carb, do so. yeast is problematic when you aren't using it to make alcohol.

If you cannot afford a Tank and regulator, make your own... well, kinda: CO2 Generator
It's at least worth the experiment.

Have other hobbies: Wine making can turn the above into a 2 for one process (just make sugar wine, use the escaping CO2 to carb up your sodas, then add flavor to your wine base.) learn about making extracts and use your own for sodas, look into soap making, Beer Soap could work... maybe...We're looking into it.

Look for flavors everywhere, I also want to know if an avacado soda would work... quickly to be followed by Tomato Soda, jalapino Soda and Tortilla soda..

Tell everyone your horror stories and pass on what you learn from them (don't use coconut milk in a soda) there, now YOU wont be tempted.

Soda is more incentive to making a Beer-Gun than beer is..

When you get around to buying a CO2 canister and regulator, remember this: you can keg without kegs: Cheap 3 Liter Kegs

combine that with your beer gun and start a business.

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Old 10-03-2009, 01:48 PM   #27
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Alright so i'm culinary student (almost finished with my degree) and I'm thinking about trying soda as a hobby. I had a few questions that would probably clarify some stuff for new comers and myself.

First,
When using a carbonation cap (home made in my case) can any c02 canister be used? For instance I'm using the same c02 bottle from when i use to play paintball way back. I hooked it up with a remote and bought some attatchments and it seemed to work on the water (waiting on results as I write)

When carbing the general procedure is?
So far what I've gathered is:
Fill 2L with desired liquid
Secure Carb cap
Chill
Infuse with c02
Shake vigorously to combine
(Im a guy who needs signs to know when things are done so I figured the c02 was emulsified with the water once I stopped shaking and very tiny bubbles still clung to the sides of the bottle and rose slowly in the water continuously)
then let sit in the refridgerator for 15-20 minutes
serve.

let me know if i got that right

note: just checked my finished product and I got cold water that smelled like c02 but tasted like water.

and maybe a suggestion for future reference. A lot of waters that come out of the tap are pretty unsanitary considering that there are a lot of chemicals in the cleaning process. Maybe okay to drink right away but maybe not alright for long term bottling. Especially when certain minerals and metals react with acids which seem to be contained in most of the purees in the recipes you guys use.

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Old 10-11-2009, 10:54 PM   #28
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I like the FAQ idea for soda.

What do people do to make "Diet" soda? Does anyone use Splenda to sweeten it? If so how much?

Thanks!

Joe

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Old 12-14-2009, 03:58 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by MTBREWDOG View Post
What do people do to make "Diet" soda? Does anyone use Splenda to sweeten it? If so how much?

Thanks!

Joe
I made a batch of rootbeer with a friend with a splenda/sugar mix. The package says the ratio for sugar replacement. We used that and it tasted good.

What are people using for faucets for soda? Right now I have a picnic tap hooked up, but I would like to put a real tap on the door for soda. Forward sealing the only way to go? Do you cap the faucet? Thanks!
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Old 12-14-2009, 12:44 PM   #30
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stainless or plastic is best for soda due to the higher co2 volume. high levels of carbonic acid in the presence of copper alloys, like brass, can be toxic......

the best faucet for soda is a cornelius pre-mix valve, but they're over $100 new.... kegman.net is a source for new ones. kegkits.com advertises used ones for $29, but they're not a reputable company to do business with.... chi company has used ones for $61.25, that's probably the best source at the moment.....

the cool thing about the cornelius valve is that it has an adjustable compensator, which means that you don't need 20 feet of line to serve soda.

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