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-   -   Keg lines for soda (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f95/keg-lines-soda-69657/)

slim chillingsworth 06-19-2008 04:50 AM

Keg lines for soda
 
as mentioned in the post below this one (atm), i'm working on a ginger soda recipe. should i use a different set of lines for this? i know people have warned against using root beer in your regular beer lines, but do you think the ginger brew will be strong enough to contaminate the lines?

cookinwood 06-19-2008 07:46 AM

i would say try it in a empty soda can or a plastic cup with a lid and let it sit for a couple days then sanitize it the way you would sanitze your lines. if the smell is there.... thats the answer

david_42 06-19-2008 02:52 PM

The plastic used for beer lines doesn't absorb flavors that way the rubber o-rings do. Beer line cleaner will clean them 100%. On the other hand, you need a much longer line for soda than beer. I use 15' of 3/16".

slim chillingsworth 06-19-2008 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by david_42 (Post 719623)
On the other hand, you need a much longer line for soda than beer. I use 15' of 3/16".

why is that?

Zymurgrafi 06-19-2008 05:13 PM

Higher pressure soda is under (30 psi v. beer at 10-12) will give you wicked foaming when you try to pour. The longer length line reduces it (2 psi per foot I believe) by the time it reaches the tap/faucet.

Jester369 06-19-2008 05:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slim chillingsworth (Post 719861)
why is that?

Because soda is typically carbed to a much higher level. If you run a short line, you will foam like crazy.

:mug:

EDIT - I'm waaay too slow on hitting the post button! :D

slim chillingsworth 06-19-2008 06:02 PM

makes sense.

camiller 06-20-2008 08:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zero (Post 719912)
Higher pressure soda is under (30 psi v. beer at 10-12) will give you wicked foaming when you try to pour. The longer length line reduces it (2 psi per foot I believe) by the time it reaches the tap/faucet.

1.7 psi/foot for 3/16" ID beverage line
.7 psi/foot for 1/4" ID beverage line

WRONG>>> So for davids example he could instead use a little over 6 foot of 1/4" line instead of 17 foot of 3/16 ((0.7/1.7)*15= 6.176), if he didn't want to have a big coil of line in the fridge. <<< WRONG

Edit, I'm wrong on the math, see below.

conpewter 06-20-2008 08:43 PM

Actually don't you need 43 ft of 1/4 tubing by those figures?

camiller 06-20-2008 08:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by conpewter (Post 721609)
Actually don't you need 43 ft of 1/4 tubing by those figures?

oops, heh your right :o should have inverted the fraction, my bad :o


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