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Old 04-23-2012, 01:05 PM   #11
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I suppose a hand-pump style would suffice? Wait... do those exist for corny kegs? EDIT: yes they do.

Also, KevinM, we ideally want to put these into bottles but we'll also be drinking straight from a chilled keg. This will be served at a local market in cups and bottles for those who want them 'to go' so hopefully we go through batches in a week or two. Interesting with your idea of two kegs. Possibly later down the road!

I didn't realize that the all the sugar could be consumed by the yeast. This actually decreases the sweetness?
Since soda is very highly carbed, a hand pump would probably cause major foaming and then seemingly flat soda. That's what happens when a carbonated beverage is served with a too-short line and not enough pressure to push it out.

And yes, the sugar will be consumed by the yeast if the keg warms up at all. The way to make soda the old fashioned way with yeast is to chill it as soon as it gets carbed up. That means an ABV of under .25% or so. But if it's not kept in the fridge, the yeast will start up again when it gets warm.

Also, keep in mind that moving the keg will resuspend on the yeast back into it. You probably don't want to serve foamy yeasty flat soda to customers.

If you're planning on serving this to customers, you really need the co2 system. You could probably get the system for under $200.

If you can't do the c02 system, I think it would be better to just make the soda in 2 liter soda bottles, and pour what you need.
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Old 04-23-2012, 01:14 PM   #12
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A week or two, assuming chilled the entire time after you reach your desired pressure, should be fine then.

Yup, yeast will eat sugar until they get suppressed from too much alcohol, lack of sugar, high temperature (pastuerize) or various other reasons. The first two tend to be the usual culprits.

Should you leave the soda out, unchilled after the initial carbonating period, it'll continue to eat the sugars (decreasing sweetness), and increase co2. This includes chilling, serving and letting warm back up.

But if you keep it chilled, I'd expect a month or two of sweetness, at least. I'm fairly sure my cider was still pretty sweet in January. I just hadn't touched it since then, and it was in the same fridge the entire time.

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Old 04-24-2012, 12:49 AM   #13
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Should you leave the soda out, unchilled after the initial carbonating period, it'll continue to eat the sugars (decreasing sweetness), and increase co2. This includes chilling, serving and letting warm back up.
This is really good to know. Thanks for the tip! I didn't think of yeast like that. On a side note, is there a 'culture' of yeast with this setup and similar ones? So if I add half the amount of recommended yeast, will they accomplish the same thing as a normal amount but in a longer time? In yogurt-making this happens to be the case. A smaller amount of starter gives the bacteria (I know yeast isn't a bacteria) more 'room to grow'.

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Since soda is very highly carbed, a hand pump would probably cause major foaming and then seemingly flat soda. That's what happens when a carbonated beverage is served with a too-short line and not enough pressure to push it out.
I am curious, what aspect actually causes the foaming followed by flat soda? Is it the fact that I'm pumping outside air into it, or the fact that it doesn't provide enough pressure? The hose length could obviously be controlled if needed.

I guess my only issue with doing it in larger plastic bottles is the fact that I can't monitor the pressure. I liked the idea of using a spunding valve and holding the keg at a certain pressure for a certain amount of time so that I had the luxury of control. I know CO2 offers a lot of control of course... Is there really no feasible way of doing this? I don't mean to come off as too questioning. I'm already in this with time and money, but the CO2 route is just out of the question unfortunately.
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Old 04-27-2012, 06:13 AM   #14
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Also, what about this just for the purpose of dispensing: Use a smaller CO2 tank, maybe even a paintball gun tank (which are easily had for $15 used for a 20 oz). My spunding valve will have a T-joint. At the top will be the pressure gauge. The other will be connected to either the adjustable pressure relief (for brewing) OR a CO2 connection of some sort (for dispensing). Using the pressure gauge as a guide, we can slowly let in some CO2 with a valve of some sort to push out the beverage.

Obviously I don't know if this is even possible, and could possibly be even dangerous especially without a regulator. I just really don't want to have to buy $200 worth of CO2 equipment JUST so I can push the beverage out of the keg. Of course, any other ideas are welcome too.

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