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Old 02-26-2010, 12:16 PM   #1
Morbeer
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Default Wild local hops?

Hi folks,

I'm going to stick to the extract kits for now but, there are 2 varities of wild hops that grow here and I'm wondering if I can use them to brew this fall. If I can, how would a person go about harvesting and storing them? Do you have to treat them in anyway to remove any wild yeasts etc?

I am very much a nOOb to brewing, but if these hops turn out to be good, well I'm a damn good gardener and I might have to start a few in the back yard.

Thanks

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Old 02-26-2010, 12:58 PM   #2
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When you say "wild" do you mean they are growing out in the forest's edge like a native planting? Or are they growing along an old fence line like they had been planted in years past? Or are they leftovers from someone who used to own your place? I only ask to see if its possible they were planted for brewing, planted as ornamental or are just some native variety.

First thing you want to do is watch them as they grow and get rid of any males. Once the males pollinate, they will destroy the chemistry of the cones that do grow and there will be no sense in picking. Here's a thread on what to look for in males...http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f92/some...p-parts-72737/

Once it is harvest time (and there are plenty of threads here telling you when to harvest), make a tea out of the cones to get an idea of the bitterness and flavor profile. Follow the instructions in post #3 here: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f92/test...erness-134065/

If you like what you taste, figure out a recipe to try them out in.

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Old 02-26-2010, 01:46 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by GVH_Dan View Post
When you say "wild" do you mean they are growing out in the forest's edge like a native planting? Or are they growing along an old fence line like they had been planted in years past? Or are they leftovers from someone who used to own your place? I only ask to see if its possible they were planted for brewing, planted as ornamental or are just some native variety.

First thing you want to do is watch them as they grow and get rid of any males. Once the males pollinate, they will destroy the chemistry of the cones that do grow and there will be no sense in picking. Here's a thread on what to look for in males...http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f92/some...p-parts-72737/

Once it is harvest time (and there are plenty of threads here telling you when to harvest), make a tea out of the cones to get an idea of the bitterness and flavor profile. Follow the instructions in post #3 here: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f92/test...erness-134065/

If you like what you taste, figure out a recipe to try them out in.
Well they are growing along an old dirt road and in the woods. So I'm guessing native, they've been there since I was a kid . No one in the area can tell me if they were planted or not, but they are prolific! THanks for the link, I'll keep and eye on them this spring.
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Old 02-26-2010, 01:50 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GVH_Dan View Post
When you say "wild" do you mean they are growing out in the forest's edge like a native planting? Or are they growing along an old fence line like they had been planted in years past? Or are they leftovers from someone who used to own your place? I only ask to see if its possible they were planted for brewing, planted as ornamental or are just some native variety.

First thing you want to do is watch them as they grow and get rid of any males. Once the males pollinate, they will destroy the chemistry of the cones that do grow and there will be no sense in picking. Here's a thread on what to look for in males...http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f92/some...p-parts-72737/

Once it is harvest time (and there are plenty of threads here telling you when to harvest), make a tea out of the cones to get an idea of the bitterness and flavor profile. Follow the instructions in post #3 here: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f92/test...erness-134065/

If you like what you taste, figure out a recipe to try them out in.
Or, go the more unscientific route and brew a standard IPA, throw a sh*t-ton into the kettle at flamout, a sh*t-ton of them in as a dryhop and see what you end up with.

If its horrible after bottling/kegging, forget about it for a year and see how it is...I would bet you'll be pleasantly surprised.
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Old 03-02-2010, 08:08 PM   #5
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First thing you want to do is watch them as they grow and get rid of any males.
Sounds like ancient mesopotamian policy when invading any city state.


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Once the males pollinate, they will destroy the chemistry of the cones that do grow and there will be no sense in picking. Here's a thread on what to look for in males...http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f92/some...p-parts-72737/
The pictures are gone. when I try to google make hop I don't get any images of male parts.
What do they look like?
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Old 03-02-2010, 10:37 PM   #6
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Pollination of the flowers only means that energy is diverted into making seeds, it doesn't hurt the flavor/aroma.

I've used some wild hops in beer. But for growing, it makes much more sense to start with a known rhizome.

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Old 03-02-2010, 11:14 PM   #7
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Pollination of the flowers only means that energy is diverted into making seeds, it doesn't hurt the flavor/aroma.
Same as that other budding plant I guess.

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I've used some wild hops in beer. But for growing, it makes much more sense to start with a known rhizome.
Yah. which raises the question: If you have a variety of rhizomes can they contaminate each other with pollen and produce some other unwanted variant?

Maybe not because unless one is harvesting seeds, the cross pollination won't have any effect, and then it'd only be as to the seeds.

I've read conflicting information about how much water the plants like.

Curious what people do to keep bugs and blight off them.
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Old 03-03-2010, 01:43 PM   #8
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Hop gardening basics
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Old 03-03-2010, 01:44 PM   #9
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The pictures are gone. when I try to google make hop I don't get any images of male parts.
What do they look like?
There was one picture http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x...g/DSCN1739.jpg left that showed the males.
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Old 03-03-2010, 01:47 PM   #10
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Once pollinated, I can't really comment on the flavor/aroma but I can confirm it screws up the chemistry. The plant is no longer concerned with generating the lupulin (alpha/beta acids) because it is making seeds.

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