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Old 02-26-2010, 03:07 PM   #1
mwill07
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Default what to plant? (Piedmont region, Carolinas)

I've recently gotten the gardening bug. I had a mildly successful garden last year and now I'm taking it up a level: building a couple of raised beds and having a couple yards of compost trucked in to fill them up.

While I'm doing all of this for vegetables, it only makes sense to get some hops in the ground too - unfortunately, the hops will not be in the vegetable garden - I don't want any perennials in there so I can till it all up at the end of the season.

The hop plan is to screw an eyelet into a rafter off of the overhang of my roof, and fixing a rope between the eyelet and a stake (screw?) in the ground below, using some sort of pulley system whereby I can lower the rope for harvest without getting up on the ladder. I'm hoping that the rope can be a good foot or so away from the house to prevent any vines from trying to grow underneath my siding. The overhang is about 20 feet up (2 story house), so there should be enough room for the hops to stretch out. I feel pretty good about the concept so far.

I want to start out with four plants, in two varieties. if successful (i.e. wife acceptance), I can add additional plants later on. I'd like two of each variety for some redundancy.

My concern is what can grow in this region. I know they recommend hops grow north of the 35th parallel - my exact latitude at my house is 34.93 (35 deg N is actually about 4 or 5 miles north. I figure I'm close enough to make this work). However, I'm concerned about our Carolina heat and humidity. I'm just south of Charlotte to be more exact.

I want to select hops that have been proven to grow in southern climates, and I want hops that are very versatile. I've seen from Zulu's blog that he's been successful with Cascade, Centennial, Golding, Mt Hood, Nugget and Willamette, and that's not far from me.

I've pretty much nailed down that I want to grow Cascade to start with, and I'd like something else to compliment. I want something that can be used with cascade (i.e. bitter w/ cascade, aroma with ____), as well as a foundation for other beers as well. As far as my tastes in what I like to brew - I like non-dark ales: pales, bitters, browns, strong, etc. I'm not so much into stouts/porters, and I don't have capabilities (yet) for lagers.

So - long story short - pls suggest a versatile hop that will grow well in southern climates that can compliment cascade.

TIA

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Old 02-26-2010, 03:32 PM   #2
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I would think that most kinds of hops would do well for you.
Here's a link on garden zones -
http://www.demesne.info/Garden-Help/...rdiness-SE.htm

And for purchasing plants -
http://www.forestfarm.com/products.p...ntName:Humulus

Hope this helps!

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Old 03-06-2010, 05:03 PM   #3
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Default Carolina Hops

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Originally Posted by mwill07 View Post
I've recently gotten the gardening bug. I had a mildly successful garden last year and now I'm taking it up a level: building a couple of raised beds and having a couple yards of compost trucked in to fill them up.

While I'm doing all of this for vegetables, it only makes sense to get some hops in the ground too - unfortunately, the hops will not be in the vegetable garden - I don't want any perennials in there so I can till it all up at the end of the season.

The hop plan is to screw an eyelet into a rafter off of the overhang of my roof, and fixing a rope between the eyelet and a stake (screw?) in the ground below, using some sort of pulley system whereby I can lower the rope for harvest without getting up on the ladder. I'm hoping that the rope can be a good foot or so away from the house to prevent any vines from trying to grow underneath my siding. The overhang is about 20 feet up (2 story house), so there should be enough room for the hops to stretch out. I feel pretty good about the concept so far.

I want to start out with four plants, in two varieties. if successful (i.e. wife acceptance), I can add additional plants later on. I'd like two of each variety for some redundancy.

My concern is what can grow in this region. I know they recommend hops grow north of the 35th parallel - my exact latitude at my house is 34.93 (35 deg N is actually about 4 or 5 miles north. I figure I'm close enough to make this work). However, I'm concerned about our Carolina heat and humidity. I'm just south of Charlotte to be more exact.

I want to select hops that have been proven to grow in southern climates, and I want hops that are very versatile. I've seen from Zulu's blog that he's been successful with Cascade, Centennial, Golding, Mt Hood, Nugget and Willamette, and that's not far from me.

I've pretty much nailed down that I want to grow Cascade to start with, and I'd like something else to compliment. I want something that can be used with cascade (i.e. bitter w/ cascade, aroma with ____), as well as a foundation for other beers as well. As far as my tastes in what I like to brew - I like non-dark ales: pales, bitters, browns, strong, etc. I'm not so much into stouts/porters, and I don't have capabilities (yet) for lagers.

So - long story short - pls suggest a versatile hop that will grow well in southern climates that can compliment cascade.

TIA
Well Mwill, I live in Charlotte so I would assume that our climates are identical. This is my second year with hops. Last April I started with 2 Cascades, 2 Centennials, and 2 Mount Hoods. I started in 20 gallon planters because I wanted the ability to move them around depending on the leaf cover in my backyard. This year they will be in the ground. The cascades grew like weeds in the warm humid climate of the south. Even for being the first year the harvest was quite impressive. The Centennials did almost as well as the Cascades but lagged behind just a bit. The Mount Hoods were another story. They always seemed to be a month behind the Cascades and the Centennials in growth and really did not produce near the amount of cones. I think that if you stick to a strong US Hybrid you will be happy with the results. If you choose Cascades then you better be ready for lots of hop cones in exchange for lots of fertilizer and lots of early morning water. Good Luck! Please be sure to upload some pictures when you get started. Your trellis idea sounds good. I like the ability to harvest without climbing a ladder.
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Old 03-06-2010, 06:09 PM   #4
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Willamette might be a good choice. It's a decent bittering hop that can be used as a replacement for Fuggle.

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Old 03-10-2010, 12:13 AM   #5
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I put in two each of a NA Hallertau and Fuggles in Lexington, SC last year and got 'some' actual hop cones from the Fuggles, and quite a few from the Hallertau in the first growth season. I'm hoping to get a bit more out of each this year as well as expand the yard w/ Cascade, Horizon, and maybe Simcoe. Bottom line if you make sure to baby them a little the first year, I think you'll have luck w/ most. I know from exp that we did w/ the aforementioned. Good luck!

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Old 03-10-2010, 12:40 AM   #6
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Default Thanks for this thread!

I was just about to ask almost the same thing. My LHBS is taking pre-orders for hop rhizomes up to the 15th. I got to get my **** in order. I am in a similar climate (south Raleigh, NC.) and was a little concerned about the heat and humidity. I have a Master degree in Horticulture, so I tend to over think things a bit. While I have a nice garden, and landscape, hops are a very new thing to me. I feel I can grow them well, culturally, but living on 6 acres I wonder how well they will do with our resident deer population. I would hate to invest $40 in a bunch of rhizomes just to feed the deer. I know I can fence the hop pole, but I would rather not go through that expense. What are ya'lls experience with deer and hops? And on another thought are they dangerous to chickens? My wife has a bunch and I would hate to kill them.
TIA for any and all advice.
Dave:-)

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Old 03-10-2010, 04:29 PM   #7
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Deer will eat the newly emergent bines when they get a chance. I don't know how many you have to worry over but they are pests in the spring. They leave the bines alone after the bines get prickly. They only ocassionally eat a leaf. Now rabbits will nibble on the bines all year killing the bines and then hop on to sample yet another bine.

Chickens are more of pest to the hops then vise versa due to their digging. Actual hops consumption as been tested to benefit chickens in the war against diseases.
http://urbanchickens.org/blog/feedin...ncrease-health
http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr/2008/081029.htm
Fragrant eggs and no grasshoppers!

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