Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Hops Growing > Second year overgrowth!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 05-29-2010, 10:06 PM   #1
neildytham
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 35
Default Second year overgrowth!

Don't know if this is the nest place for this question but here goes:
I have numerous bines on my second year chinooks-it's looking good, but many of them have started shooting out more bines from the points where I got flowers from last year. I don't have strong support for these, and I'm worried they will detract from my yield, but I'm also worried to remove them because surely they won't flower from there.
Has anyone had similar problems? Any suggestions or should I just leave them to do their own thing?
I seriously had about 8 original bines but have about twice that many shooting off the originals!

__________________
neildytham is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-30-2010, 03:52 AM   #2
B-Hoppy
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
B-Hoppy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: ohio
Posts: 1,260
Liked 124 Times on 99 Posts
Likes Given: 215

Default

if they are coming out of the ground, yank them out as these are excessive shoots. if they are coming off of the vines you have trained, from the junction where the leaves are are coming out, you can pull the lower ones off. these are sidearms. most of the hops are produced on the sidearms coming from the top 2/3 of the vines. the lower sidearms mostly just create a mess at the base of the vines and impede air circulation, so removing them would be a good thing.

__________________
B-Hoppy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-30-2010, 03:46 PM   #3
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,651
Liked 133 Times on 126 Posts

Default

Chinook sidearms can run up to 40". Leave them alone.

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-30-2010, 04:13 PM   #4
B-Hoppy
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
B-Hoppy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: ohio
Posts: 1,260
Liked 124 Times on 99 Posts
Likes Given: 215

Default

david, i would disagree and am only stating what has worked for me in the past and what is recommended by oregon state and other hop growing resources: http://plant-disease.ippc.orst.edu/d...m?RecordID=599 and http://ipmnet.org/plant-disease/dise...m?RecordID=603 . the sections on 'cultural practices' suggest removing the lower leaves.

__________________
B-Hoppy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-30-2010, 08:40 PM   #5
neildytham
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 35
Default

Ok, so if I leave them they will likely end up climbing the same twine I have for the others-will this be an issue? It seems to me they may end up strangling each other? I could put up more twine for them to grow on, but not for all of them!

What have others done?

__________________
neildytham is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-31-2010, 05:55 AM   #6
B-Hoppy
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
B-Hoppy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: ohio
Posts: 1,260
Liked 124 Times on 99 Posts
Likes Given: 215

Default

they're not gonna strangle each other but they'll create a very dense mass of vegetation which impedes air movement along the bottom of the growing area. if you have situations of high relative humidities in the early part of the growing season, you are creating an environment conducive to disease proliferation. all i'm saying is that if you give a plant optimum growing conditions(within your realm), creating an environment that is as stress free as possible for the plant will lessen the problems that MAY occur further on down the road. good soil amendments, enough room to grow, light, water and such, things will progress fine. my whole being, while working in the green industry, was dealing with customers who had problems with their lawns and plants that were either self-imposed or just overlooked. the main thing i learned, and am still observing, is that if you can manage to give a plant what it needs, it will perform well for you. any hurdles you throw in front of it, will just slow it down. as you know, plants don't have legs and cannot jump hurdles! yuk, yuk! sorry, i had to work tonight, and will do the same tomorrow, so needless to say i'm enjoying a few hoppy beers. you too b-hoppy! and HAPPY HOLIDAY!

__________________
B-Hoppy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
It's been almost a year.... music-n-beer Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 11-03-2009 03:31 AM
08-08-08 RIS - One year later olllllo Sampling and Critiquing and Beer Swapping 12 08-26-2009 07:54 AM
1 Year Anniversary of opening my first Homebrew...how was your year 2? Stevorino General Beer Discussion 11 12-30-2008 04:30 AM
Oke, so its been a year. Richterman Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 09-11-2007 05:53 PM
Two year old DME iloman Recipes/Ingredients 3 10-18-2006 06:02 PM