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Old 05-28-2009, 05:06 PM   #1
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Default Rooting Compound or Root Hormone any one??

I have one Rhizome that is not really doing anything and it has been in the ground for about 3 weeks now. There are some whitish spots on it that looks like it could either be fungus or the roots starting to grow. The Rhizome is still hard like a branch. I have read about rooting compound and rooting hormone and that it can be use to stimulate growth. I did not let the rhizome sit in warm water before planting. I am thinking of digging it out, letting it sit in Luke warm water for an hour or so, adding some rooting compound and re planting. It is planted in a 19g Rubbermaid container that I converted into a planter. Any thoughts on this?

TIA,

Zman

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Old 05-28-2009, 05:15 PM   #2
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The white spots are shootlet nodes. The more the better unless they get fuzzy, then thats mold.

Sometimes it can take up to a month for these things to take. What are the daily temps and how much shade do they spots get?

I have never heard of letting the rhisome soak in warm water prior to planting and given the fact that they don't like to be bogged that seems counter productive.

I say leave them alone and keep the soil moist to touch but not soggy. Locate the planters in a warm, sunny spot and keep an eye on the soil moistuire to make sure the pots aren't just roasting in the sun. Since there isn't any root struture yet the stock needs frequent light waterings but can eailsy become bogged if overdone.

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Old 05-28-2009, 05:28 PM   #3
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They are not in the shade as there really is no shade in my back yard. I could move then to the side of the house. Here in the Denver Metro area it as been between mid 60's to the 80's this week. My neighborhood got about 1.5" of rain over the last few days. I have read that people soak the rhizome in luke warm water in order to stimulate growth. The soil appears to be pretty moist. I am watering every few days @ 2g/19g of soil. I am using a watering can so it creates a sprinkling effect. I am growing them in Miracle grow potting mix mixed with sheep manure and a bit of red mulch on tops to prevent it from drying out too quickly. I have not fertilized as of yet. Miracle Grow says that it feeds for 3 months. I know I need to fertilize it but I am confused as to how much and how often.

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Old 05-28-2009, 06:57 PM   #4
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Don't shade them. You want the soil to warm up and that will bring on the growth. But, you also need to be mindful of watering too much and too little as a result. Don't judge the surface soil as an indicator of moisture. Stick your finger in.

Maybe even try taking the mulch off. That stuff can suck nutrients out of the soil and uses a lot of the vailable notrogen as it break down over time plus, it can insulate the soil thus keeping the warmth from getting to the rootstock.

At the least, I may suggest you move the mulch away from directly over the rhisome but not completely remove it. this will allow heat down to the stock but still give the benifit of moisture control.

Given the use of the manure and the MG seeded soil you shouldn't need to fertilize. The manure is slow release as are the MG seeds in the soil.

For giggles, try sticking a digital therm in the soil and see what the temp is.

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Old 05-28-2009, 07:14 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GilaMinumBeer View Post
Don't shade them. You want the soil to warm up and that will bring on the growth. But, you also need to be mindful of watering too much and too little as a result. Don't judge the surface soil as an indicator of moisture. Stick your finger in.

Maybe even try taking the mulch off. That stuff can suck nutrients out of the soil and uses a lot of the vailable notrogen as it break down over time plus, it can insulate the soil thus keeping the warmth from getting to the rootstock.

At the least, I may suggest you move the mulch away from directly over the rhisome but not completely remove it. this will allow heat down to the stock but still give the benifit of moisture control.

Given the use of the manure and the MG seeded soil you shouldn't need to fertilize. The manure is slow release as are the MG seeds in the soil.

For giggles, try sticking a digital therm in the soil and see what the temp is.
good idea on the thermometer. thanks.
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Old 05-28-2009, 10:37 PM   #6
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Night-time temperatures are extremely important, because the ground can cool rapidly even if it was warm during the day. Mine don't get going until it is consistently over 45F at night.

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Old 05-28-2009, 10:51 PM   #7
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Night-time temperatures are extremely important, because the ground can cool rapidly even if it was warm during the day. Mine don't get going until it is consistently over 45F at night.
I am pretty sure it has been consistently in the 50's overnight here in Denver. One of the two have sprouted already, but that one had an active shoot already. This one is still just a solid rhizome with no signs of growth. I think I am going to soak it in warm water and add some rooting hormone to it to see if I can give it a push.
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