Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway - Enter Now!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Hops Growing > Rhizome Conundrum

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 08-02-2009, 05:01 PM   #1
MeetsCriteria
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 94
Liked 7 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default Rhizome Conundrum

Well, one of my hops started out looking good, then died back. Not sure the issue. I thought over-watering perhaps.

Anyways, I decided to dig up the Centennial rhizome as everything looked dead. Plan was to put something else in the pot.

Well, here is what I dug up:





Don't know about you guys, but looks pretty darn viable. The part I have in my hand seems to be sort of rotten but the other end is firm, and then there's all the buds on it.

My first though was to put it back in the ground. But my pot busted as I was amending the soil.

So, I put it in a plastic baggie, and in the fridge for now. Question is, plant it, to try to get a head start for next year, or just chalk it up and plant it in the spring?

I'd probably get a bigger pot this time. Wine barrel or some such...

Thoughts appreciated...especially from anyone who has experience planting rhizomes late in the season, and what to expect next year, etc...

Cheers,

Mike

__________________

Last edited by MeetsCriteria; 08-02-2009 at 06:17 PM. Reason: Spelling / grammar
MeetsCriteria is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-02-2009, 05:09 PM   #2
chefmike
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: north Georgia
Posts: 1,358
Liked 8 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

I do not speak from experience, but my personal inclination, with respect to your location, would be to put it in the ground. If it has life, let it put down some roots, get some leaves and it will take care of itself over the winter.

I do not think you have quite the worries that folks further north do... in fact, I would bet that put in the ground now, you will still get a pretty decent growth before cool weather forces it to go dormant.

One of mine died after an early harvest (and it was 20', multiple bines)... it sent up new shoots not too long after. I would post picts, but it is raining outside here.

Just my thoughts. The ground is where it wants to be.

__________________
Reformation Brewery: We went professional
Obsessing over: starting a local brewery (hence I am not here much these days!), Pickles, my wife, 2 year old and 5 year old, my chevy 6.5L diesel Suburban
Reading: fall of giants by ken follett
Building: gardens, recipes, and trailer mounted smoker/ wood pizza oven
chefmike is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-02-2009, 05:18 PM   #3
svengoat
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Gloversville NY
Posts: 198
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Put that bad boy back in the ground, it looks great... In SD it should have plenty of time to come back...

__________________
svengoat is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-02-2009, 06:20 PM   #4
MeetsCriteria
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 94
Liked 7 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

That's what I'm leaning towards. Seems it'd have a better chance in the ground than in a plastic baggie in the fridge all winter...(whatever winter in SD is!)

__________________
MeetsCriteria is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-02-2009, 08:04 PM   #5
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,651
Liked 133 Times on 126 Posts

Default

San Diego? Plant it. Cut the rotted parts off first.

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-03-2009, 03:43 PM   #6
The Soft Underbelly
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Joliet, Il
Posts: 218
Liked 9 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 19

Default

+1 on cutting off the rotted parts. looks pretty healthy otherwise. amend your soil with some sand, perlite or lava rock... something to loosen it up and allow it to breathe.

__________________
The Soft Underbelly is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-03-2009, 03:51 PM   #7
GilaMinumBeer
In yo' garage, steelin' yo parts.
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
GilaMinumBeer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Oblivion
Posts: 47,398
Liked 4695 Times on 4350 Posts
Likes Given: 58

Default

Clean a sharp knife with rubbing alcohol and cleanly cut off the root rot. Then plant that thing.

__________________
GilaMinumBeer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-03-2009, 05:22 PM   #8
humann_brewing
More Humann than human
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
humann_brewing's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: the sun
Posts: 15,678
Liked 309 Times on 307 Posts
Likes Given: 18

Default

I haven't checked but I may be in a similar situation as you. I have thizomes that have not even broken the ground this year (first year).

How do I know if they are dead or worth the water they are getting?

__________________
humann_brewing is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-04-2009, 02:13 AM   #9
MeetsCriteria
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 94
Liked 7 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by humann_brewing View Post
I haven't checked but I may be in a similar situation as you. I have thizomes that have not even broken the ground this year (first year).

How do I know if they are dead or worth the water they are getting?
Mine all first came up. Within a week in fact. This one really lagged however, and then the shoots withered away.

Another is over 20' tall and covered with hops (first year no less) though it is Chinook. Same pots. Same soil. Same watering schedule. I don't understand that, but it was the case.

It seems to me that little harm could come from looking if it's been months.

I used to fish a ton (before moving), and at times, the fish on the bottom sounder were so thick, you'd think you'd have to snag one with your hook, bait or no bait. I had a rule that if the bottom looked good, and no bites within 10 sec (or so) I'd reel up (even though it was say 130' of water) to check bait. Under the right conditions, the bait would be gone over 90% of the time. Never hurts to look.

I wouldn't say dig them all up, but you've been operating on faith for sometime. Time for a little objective feedback to know where you stand, I say.

At least then you can start making plans for next year, should the worst come to fruition. If things are happening...well just but it back. I'd carefully dig it up, which is what I did in this case...

Just my two cents...

Mike
__________________
MeetsCriteria is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
temperature conundrum psyber DIY Projects 10 08-05-2009 04:07 AM
Conundrum SmugMug Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 05-13-2009 09:56 PM
Keg conversion conundrum donshizzles DIY Projects 4 02-27-2009 09:53 PM
Gelatin conundrum McCuckerson General Beer Discussion 10 12-01-2008 06:36 PM