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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Hops Growing > Hop Twine and Placement
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Old 03-24-2008, 11:30 PM   #1
Arneba28
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Default Hop Twine and Placement

I know lots of people have had no problem with using the hop twine that they sell on alot of the sites. However is this only suitable for completely vertical growth or can they support angled growth (25deg) since the weight will be distributed differently, or should I just go with a 3/8" rope.
Also, I searched and cant seem to find if I should wait till the sprout breaks the soil surface to anchor the growing lines or just anchor then in very close proximity to the intended sprouting area.
I am starting light this year and only doing three rhizomes, 1 Magnum, 1 Cascade and 1 Centennial.

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Old 07-02-2008, 04:42 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arneba28 View Post
I know lots of people have had no problem with using the hop twine that they sell on alot of the sites. However is this only suitable for completely vertical growth or can they support angled growth (25deg) since the weight will be distributed differently, or should I just go with a 3/8" rope.
Also, I searched and cant seem to find if I should wait till the sprout breaks the soil surface to anchor the growing lines or just anchor then in very close proximity to the intended sprouting area.
I am starting light this year and only doing three rhizomes, 1 Magnum, 1 Cascade and 1 Centennial.
I havn't used the hop twine, I instead use baling twine I can get for free, however I see no reason why you could not anchor them at an angle. The biggest load is not the weight but the wind when fully leafed. The load is also higher if you have the full 18+ feet vs if you are against a building.

You can anchor the twine near where the sprout is planted. The bine can easily be trained to a rope feet away from where it breaks the ground.

Ofcourse the bine probably broke the ground over a month ago.

Craig
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Old 07-02-2008, 04:53 PM   #3
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3/8" Sisal rope is as good as anything. For most, it will last two seasons before it needs replaced and you can buy it in spools of 100, 200, or 500 foot.

I have some of the Coir rope but have yet to use it for anything. I'd much rather use something available locally rather than having to stock up.

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Old 07-02-2008, 05:59 PM   #4
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I use the Coir twine & my lines are sloped about 30 degrees. Not a problem.

Until recently, the pros planted on a 7x7 grid and used slanted lines. Now, because it makes for cheaper drip irrigation systems, less labor for attaching the bines to the cords and easier harvesting, they plant on a 14x3 and go vertical.

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Old 07-03-2008, 12:30 AM   #5
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I switched to jute twine this year from the synthetic crap that I used to use. So far it's holding up fine, and it's cheap!! I plan to cut it at the top at harvest time, so I'll just re-string next year. I made a hillbilly anchor out of a bent piece of 1/2" aluminum tent pole shoved into the ground five years ago when I planted this plant, and I put it pretty much right over the rhizome. On my new plants this year, I used one of those screw type dog chain anchors on the outside of my raised beds and ran the twine over the plants up to the teepee (hope this makes sense).

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Old 07-03-2008, 09:47 PM   #6
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I use the jute twine for my bed that runs by my house since I cut them down at the end of eacg growing season. My outer beds have some 3/8 Sisal rope but mostly "weld wire".

My friend uses chains and pulls his off the chains in the fall.

Hopboy

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Old 07-04-2008, 12:06 AM   #7
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Hopboy, I would be very interested to see some pictures of your hopyard with some varietal and age information. Since joining the site you've been very informative in this forum.

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Old 07-04-2008, 12:38 AM   #8
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The post that hold the cable that's connected to the twine are 16' and the twine is 20'.


This pic is 2 weeks old.

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Old 07-23-2008, 06:26 PM   #9
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Any specific reason to use 3/8" Sisal Rope? I grabbed 1/4" Sisal rope because Lowe's was sold out of the long packages of 3/8" and it was less than half the price of buying the same length of 3/8".

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