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Old 02-25-2014, 05:08 AM   #1
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Default Help me pick which hops

I have enough room to plant 2 rhizomes of 2 different varieties. I need help deciding between cascade, chinook, centennial and Columbus. Ay help is greatly appreciated.

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Old 02-25-2014, 05:12 AM   #2
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It really depends on what you brew. Pick your favorite recipes and plant whatever hops you could use the most of.

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Old 02-25-2014, 05:14 AM   #3
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I have enough room to plant 2 rhizomes of 2 different varieties. I need help deciding between cascade, chinook, centennial and Columbus. Ay help is greatly appreciated.
Since home grown hops are usually an unknown alpha acid level, go with the variety you like the flavor of with the highest oil content. That's what will make the difference when you use them as late addition/whirlpool/dry hops.
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Old 02-25-2014, 05:38 AM   #4
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This was my experience with first year hops. I have no idea if this was / is typical for these varieties.

These were both in pots about 20' apart from each other. Watered / fertilized the same.
First year centennial.
imageuploadedbyhome-brew1393309926.712180.jpg
Got about 30 cones.

First year cascade.
imageuploadedbyhome-brew1393310043.197063.jpg
Best I can remember, I got about 4oz after drying.

My first year chinook was worse than the centennial.

Maybe the centennial and chinook were duds... Maybe the cascade was a rock star...

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Old 02-25-2014, 05:47 AM   #5
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The first year can be a mixed bag no matter what you grow. This year should give you a more accurate idea of how they'll perform in the long run. Also, if they're both growing in pots you'll never really see their true potential as they really need room to grow to be able to perform their best. Just sayin'~

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Old 02-25-2014, 06:02 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B-Hoppy View Post
The first year can be a mixed bag no matter what you grow. This year should give you a more accurate idea of how they'll perform in the long run. Also, if they're both growing in pots you'll never really see their true potential as they really need room to grow to be able to perform their best. Just sayin'~

Yeah, I planted them in the garden after cutting them back at the end of the year. Was trying to figure out where to put them and how much space would really be needed by doing first year in pots. Wasn't sure about variety and how they perform in first year. Thanks for the info.
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Old 02-25-2014, 06:11 AM   #7
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You can actually space them about 4 feet apart if you do some serious pruning each spring, otherwise you may get some rhizomes creeping from one to the other and possibly getting them mixed up. It's not rocket science but a good back and plenty of ale makes it work better, ha!

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Old 02-25-2014, 06:24 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Island Brewer View Post
Since home grown hops are usually an unknown alpha acid level, go with the variety you like the flavor of with the highest oil content. That's what will make the difference when you use them as late addition/whirlpool/dry hops.
I'm agreeing here on this one. I made the mistake of planting Saaz and expected them to grow in Alaska like I was down south or something. I mean they grow and look nice, but they are shrimps compared to a NW variety. I don't use them in the beers I make, because I don't know and don't have firm control of the alpha acids, just like Black Island said.
But do it anyway.
Also, email or call a maltster and see if you can score some unmalted barley. They make your hop garden even more interesting.
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Old 02-25-2014, 07:00 AM   #9
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IMO, you should choose based on the weather they will be seeing. Cascade will grow practically anywhere. Chinook and Columbus apparently don't like cooler, wetter climates and prefer more sun. Something to take into consideration if you want thriving plants.

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Old 02-25-2014, 09:56 AM   #10
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I would definitely go with Cascade, it grows very well almost anywhere. For the other one what flavors do you like most. Centennial is big citrus, Chinook is piney with spice, and Columbus is dank or piney with citrus.

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