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-   -   growing in halfed wine barrels? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f92/growing-halfed-wine-barrels-381282/)

1fast636 01-14-2013 02:22 AM

growing in halfed wine barrels?
 
wondering if this would be a suttible growing area for some rhizomes. i was thinking about getting two barrles and halfing them so i can grow 4 different strands. would work perfect for my upper deck area to act as the trellis until i can make my beer garden/ brew area in the back yard. any input would be awesome and thanks in advance. Greg

LabRatBrewer 01-14-2013 02:31 AM

I have the same question. I, unfortunately, had to transfer some second year plants to 1/2 barrel planters. The root-balls were huge! I hope they survive the new small home.

GMesick 01-14-2013 10:10 PM

Re: Growing Hops in Containers
 
I have grown hops in the ground and, for the past several years, grown them in containers (not as large as half barrels, but close). My yield was better in the ground, but when I moved to my suburban yard, I wanted to limit where the rhizomes went, so they are--contained.

It works for me (aphids are a bigger problem than confined rhizomes). I get some every year (I grow 4 varieties. Very symmetrical on my patio.). Some years are better than others. I don't grow enough to meet all my brewing needs, but I can still brag that I grow my own hops. (n.b. I also freeze yeast in test tubes, so as soon as I replace my front lawn with barley, I will be an "off-the-grid" brewer :) ).

cram 01-14-2013 10:41 PM

Wine barrels (or any huge planter) work well for hops. After three or four years, assuming you start with a rhizome, you'll likely need to pull them and start over with some rhizome clippings off the massive root mass (although you can harvest a lot of rhizomes this way and it's a nice way to make some quick cash or hook some folks up with freebies).

They do need more water than their in-ground compadres. And be sure to drill four or five BIG holes in the bottom for drainage (~1-1.5") because you want good drainage. The roots will head south and block smaller holes which will lead to stagnant water in your barrels and dead hops.

1fast636 01-15-2013 02:38 AM

sweet this will be temporary till i can get my full trellis system up so that massive root mass will go in the ground at that time prolly propagted for more hops at that time then too. lol. i made a quick scetch of what i was thinking about for my twine. let me know what you think and what about rocks on the bottom to help with drainage or is it a waist of time that is in the pic to.

http://i450.photobucket.com/albums/q...ps3a095e2f.jpg

1fast636 01-15-2013 02:42 AM

also what would be the best rhizomes for me. i'm a hophead and all about my IPAs but have been likeing alot of hop forward stouts lately i was thinking about 2 different bittering and 2 different aroma hops any advice would be awesome

cram 01-15-2013 02:56 PM

Csacade is a definite must, imo--easiest to grow, heavy producer, and great aroma properties. If you want a higher alpha acid hop then I'd suggest Centennial or Chinook. I'm in a different climate than you, so maybe someone closer to home will chime in. Also, I'm a believer in sourcing freshly dug rhizomes from growers close to home, if that's an option for you.

Carlscan26 01-18-2013 12:05 AM

How big of a root mass do these get to? I have a small strip of garden area along one side of the house - it faces South West, plenty of sun, and has a two story roof above to string up lines to. It seems like the perfect spot to plant hops but my wife also grows her garden there. If these are going to take over the dirt I'll get kicked out quickly...

cram 01-18-2013 12:25 AM

1 Attachment(s)
They will take over eventually--their roots are pretty aggressive (their scientific name translates to "wolf among shrubs" I believe). But that sounds like the perfect spot with southwest exposure for hops. You might want to keep them contained in large pots/planters and let your wife have her garden space. The hops are pretty and fascinating to watch grow, so you may be able to convince her to get them in the ground next season...

Here's a picture of some first-year hops last season that had some other plants growing around them (squash, tomatoes, basil, pumpkins, etc.). I can say that none of the non-hop varieties really did as well as if they were on their own. All of these non-hop plants were compost volunteers and it turned out to be an experiment of sorts. This year, I suspect would be even worse in terms of yield for the non-hop plants since the hops have much more established roots. I guess if I trenched in between crowns and planted there then things would work out okay. But I'm sticking with the point that the hops and veggies will both do better if given their own space, which means you'll likely be better off planting hops in large pots/planters for the first year as you work out the kinks and space limitations.

If you need some rhizomes in the spring, shoot me a PM.

Carlscan26 01-18-2013 01:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cram
They will take over--their roots are pretty aggressive (their scientific name translates to "wolf among shrubs" I believe). But that sounds like the perfect spot with southwest exposure. You might want to keep them contained in large pots/planters and let the mrs. have her garden space. They are pretty, though, and are fascinating to watch grow, so you may be able to convince her to get them in the ground next season...

Yeah I think I'll do that - thanks!

How big a pot do you think?


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