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Old 04-13-2010, 04:56 PM   #1
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Default First Year Hop Sprouts, Route them all up one string??

From all of my readings, I've decided to not trim back the smaller sprouts, but to just let them grow. Should I run them around the larger bine that's already growing up the string or should I run more line?

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Old 04-13-2010, 05:05 PM   #2
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only string 2 or 3 bines on a given climbing rope. Trim all the rest of the shoots back to channel the energy and nutrients to the primary bines.

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Old 04-13-2010, 05:10 PM   #3
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Which ones should I pick? Should I just use common sense and choose the ones that seem to be growing the fastest?

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Old 04-13-2010, 08:59 PM   #4
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Thick hearty looking guys is all I look for and sometimes I select them based on how my strings are oriented such that the onces I select have no issue grabbing hold and climbing without twisting them funny or anything like that. I go 2 strings from each crown so I try to select 2-3 on each side of the crown to train on that given stringer.

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Old 04-13-2010, 09:08 PM   #5
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Hmm, I could always run another line, but I'm just wondering if this is what I should do.

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Old 04-13-2010, 09:53 PM   #6
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Quote:
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but I'm just wondering if this is what I should do.

That's an easy one. RDWHAHB!
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Old 04-14-2010, 04:10 AM   #7
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generally, if they are first year plants, you'll develop a much larger root system if you train all the growth up. think of the leaves as little solar panels. hops are very close to the top of the heap when in comes to turning light energy into food energy for the growing plant. the only drawback i've faced is when it comes to thinning out the lower leaves, 3-4 feet off the ground once they are really up and climbing (june/july), is that some of the weaker shoots may take a beating in the process. the thinning of the lower leaves is to increase air circulation for those of us who live in humid climates as a way to provide an environment less conducive to disease development (downy mildew). the minimal damage to the weaker shoots is a minor issue compared to producing a large healthy root mass during the establishment period. year two and onward it's a good idea to thin as necessary. hope that helps. and remember to b-hoppy!

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Old 04-14-2010, 12:42 PM   #8
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Quote:
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generally, if they are first year plants, you'll develop a much larger root system if you train all the growth up. think of the leaves as little solar panels. hops are very close to the top of the heap when in comes to turning light energy into food energy for the growing plant. the only drawback i've faced is when it comes to thinning out the lower leaves, 3-4 feet off the ground once they are really up and climbing (june/july), is that some of the weaker shoots may take a beating in the process. the thinning of the lower leaves is to increase air circulation for those of us who live in humid climates as a way to provide an environment less conducive to disease development (downy mildew). the minimal damage to the weaker shoots is a minor issue compared to producing a large healthy root mass during the establishment period. year two and onward it's a good idea to thin as necessary. hope that helps. and remember to b-hoppy!

Hoppy,

Thanks for the great info, but I guess I left some info out. I'm growing them in 20" wine barrel style planters. I know that a large root system is important, but should I take in account the size of the planter and trim some sprouts? I don't want to have a "health issue" because I have too much plant in a planter that is probably barely big enough.

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Old 04-14-2010, 03:39 PM   #9
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if you are growing them in planters, then go ahead and thin. you're probably gonna have to do a sort of bonsai technique on them if that will be their final growing place. if they grow pretty well in your neck of the woods, they'll probably be ready to outgrow the planters in a few years. in the fall of the year, you can 'lift' them out of the pot, trim the crown, and replant. next spring everything will be ready to go, but with a smaller more compact crown. good luck.

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Old 04-15-2010, 03:42 PM   #10
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I never did get professional opinion from Hops growers on this, but my horticultural friends all told me to leave all first year growth, let them grow and it will create a bigger root system for next year.

We did this and had all plants return very strong year 2 (and then onwards)

Just train a few , as many as you want to, and let others grow wild.

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