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-   -   First time growing: Apartment hops in the High Desert (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f92/first-time-growing-apartment-hops-high-desert-319857/)

bobbrews 04-12-2012 12:24 AM

4 Attachment(s)

For short-term plants, I usually use 5 parts partially-composted pine bark, 1 part spaghnum peat, and 1-2 parts perlite (along with a control-release fertilizer of NPK, plus something else that supplies all the minor nutrients, and some gypsum or lime).... However, hops are long term plants and for long-term container growth, you'll need something more stable that won't break down over time but still provide excellent drainage. The previous recipe is only good for plants that last for one season.

Here is the best recipe for long-term container growth that I've ever used. It allows for superior drainage and will last a very long time:

1 part uncomposted screened pine or fir bark (1/8-1/4")
1 part screened Turface
1 part crushed Gran-I-Grit (grower size) or #2 cherrystone
1 tbsp gypsum per gallon of soil
A 3-1-2 ratio fertilizer that contains all essentials and apply weakly, weekly (pun intended)
Control Release Fertilizer (if desired)
Source of micro-nutrients that supplies all the minors
1/8 -1/4 tsp Epsom salts per gallon of fertilizer solution every time you fertilize (if soluble, it is probable it does not contain Ca or Mg)

* Add the gypsum when you make the soil. It is added as a Ca source, or you can skip the gypsum and use Foliage-Pro fertilizer, which contains both Ca and Mg. You definitely should add it when using soluble fertilizers that do not contain Ca, so you need to read the label for contents. If you use gypsum as a Ca source when you make the soil, you should add Epsom salts each time you fertilize. The reason is because a high presence of Ca in the soil in relation to the amount of Mg can make Mg unavailable. The Ca:Mg ratio should be around 3 to 5:1, Ca:Mg.

This is what the ingredients look like... starting left/top and working clockwise... turface, perlite, fir bark, and granite chips...

The larger stones in the sharpee pics are what you want, not the smaller ones.


bobbrews 04-12-2012 12:24 AM

4 Attachment(s)

For short-term plants, I usually use 5 parts partially-composted pine bark, 1 part spaghnum peat, and 1-2 parts perlite (along with a control-release fertilizer of NPK, plus something else that supplies all the minor nutrients, and some gypsum or lime).... However, hops are long term plants and for long-term container growth, you'll need something more stable that won't break down over time but still provide excellent drainage. The previous recipe is only good for plants that last for one season.

Here is the best recipe for long-term container growth that I've ever used. It allows for superior drainage and will last a very long time:

1 part uncomposted screened pine or fir bark (1/8-1/4")
1 part screened Turface
1 part crushed Gran-I-Grit (grower size) or #2 cherrystone
1 tbsp gypsum per gallon of soil
A 3-1-2 ratio fertilizer that contains all essentials and apply weakly, weekly (pun intended)
Control Release Fertilizer (if desired)
Source of micro-nutrients that supplies all the minors
1/8 -1/4 tsp Epsom salts per gallon of fertilizer solution every time you fertilize (if soluble, it is probable it does not contain Ca or Mg)

* Add the gypsum when you make the soil. It is added as a Ca source, or you can skip the gypsum and use Foliage-Pro fertilizer, which contains both Ca and Mg. You definitely should add it when using soluble fertilizers that do not contain Ca, so you need to read the label for contents. If you use gypsum as a Ca source when you make the soil, you should add Epsom salts each time you fertilize. The reason is because a high presence of Ca in the soil in relation to the amount of Mg can make Mg unavailable. The Ca:Mg ratio should be around 3 to 5:1, Ca:Mg.

This is what the ingredients look like... starting left/top and working clockwise... turface, perlite, fir bark, and granite chips...

The larger stones in the sharpee pics are what you want, not the smaller ones.


bobbrews 04-12-2012 12:24 AM

4 Attachment(s)

For short-term plants, I usually use 5 parts partially-composted pine bark, 1 part spaghnum peat, and 1-2 parts perlite (along with a control-release fertilizer of NPK, plus something else that supplies all the minor nutrients, and some gypsum or lime).... However, hops are long term plants and for long-term container growth, you'll need something more stable that won't break down over time but still provide excellent drainage. The previous recipe is only good for plants that last for one season.

Here is the best recipe for long-term container growth that I've ever used. It allows for superior drainage and will last a very long time:

1 part uncomposted screened pine or fir bark (1/8-1/4")
1 part screened Turface
1 part crushed Gran-I-Grit (grower size) or #2 cherrystone
1 tbsp gypsum per gallon of soil
A 3-1-2 ratio fertilizer that contains all essentials and apply weakly, weekly (pun intended)
Control Release Fertilizer (if desired)
Source of micro-nutrients that supplies all the minors
1/8 -1/4 tsp Epsom salts per gallon of fertilizer solution every time you fertilize (if soluble, it is probable it does not contain Ca or Mg)

* Add the gypsum when you make the soil. It is added as a Ca source, or you can skip the gypsum and use Foliage-Pro fertilizer, which contains both Ca and Mg. You definitely should add it when using soluble fertilizers that do not contain Ca, so you need to read the label for contents. If you use gypsum as a Ca source when you make the soil, you should add Epsom salts each time you fertilize. The reason is because a high presence of Ca in the soil in relation to the amount of Mg can make Mg unavailable. The Ca:Mg ratio should be around 3 to 5:1, Ca:Mg.

This is what the ingredients look like... starting left/top and working clockwise... turface, perlite, fir bark, and granite chips...

The larger stones in the sharpee pics are what you want, not the smaller ones.


bobbrews 04-12-2012 12:24 AM

4 Attachment(s)

For short-term plants, I usually use 5 parts partially-composted pine bark, 1 part spaghnum peat, and 1-2 parts perlite (along with a control-release fertilizer of NPK, plus something else that supplies all the minor nutrients, and some gypsum or lime).... However, hops are long term plants and for long-term container growth, you'll need something more stable that won't break down over time but still provide excellent drainage. The previous recipe is only good for plants that last for one season.

Here is the best recipe for long-term container growth that I've ever used. It allows for superior drainage and will last a very long time:

1 part uncomposted screened pine or fir bark (1/8-1/4")
1 part screened Turface
1 part crushed Gran-I-Grit (grower size) or #2 cherrystone
1 tbsp gypsum per gallon of soil
A 3-1-2 ratio fertilizer that contains all essentials and apply weakly, weekly (pun intended)
Control Release Fertilizer (if desired)
Source of micro-nutrients that supplies all the minors
1/8 -1/4 tsp Epsom salts per gallon of fertilizer solution every time you fertilize (if soluble, it is probable it does not contain Ca or Mg)

* Add the gypsum when you make the soil. It is added as a Ca source, or you can skip the gypsum and use Foliage-Pro fertilizer, which contains both Ca and Mg. You definitely should add it when using soluble fertilizers that do not contain Ca, so you need to read the label for contents. If you use gypsum as a Ca source when you make the soil, you should add Epsom salts each time you fertilize. The reason is because a high presence of Ca in the soil in relation to the amount of Mg can make Mg unavailable. The Ca:Mg ratio should be around 3 to 5:1, Ca:Mg.

This is what the ingredients look like... starting left/top and working clockwise... turface, perlite, fir bark, and granite chips...

The larger stones in the sharpee pics are what you want, not the smaller ones.



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