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Old 04-23-2013, 07:59 PM   #31
PariahVineyard
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Yeah, get a soil test. I just sent mine in last week, only $10 dollars from Penn State.

Last year I was using a 20-20-20 in my drip line. This year, due to the excess use of chicken manure on the property, I will be hand spreading N and K but leaving the P out. This all depends on the soil test results as well.

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Old 04-23-2013, 08:13 PM   #32
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Okay, I will take some soil samples to my local nursery tommorow or maybe for penn state for that price not bad at all. Thanks

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Old 04-25-2013, 03:16 PM   #33
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I have not grown hops, but I believe that the soil should be the primary concern when growing any kind of plant.

I saw you ripping down the planting line, how deep does that go? It looked like the rest of the area might be pretty compacted from all the activity. Roots usually like loose airy soil in order to grow easily; you may want to think of rototilling the soil after you're done with construction. Even if you're supplying all the nutrient needs, if the roots aren't able to grow large enough due to tough soil, they won't be able to uptake all the fertilizer.

If you decide not to do the hand spreader, this is what I use for my fields:

http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/stor...r?cm_vc=-10005

It's $100, but I take off the hand sprayer and hook it up to the irrigation line.

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Old 04-25-2013, 03:23 PM   #34
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@bandt
That is a cheap alternative also for how many gallons it holds as well. How exactly did you hook it up to your drip line?
Would you mind taking a picture?
I have a cultivator that I plan on running through the whole area before I put the plants in the ground.
I have grape vines in the same area and they have been striving they went from nothing to bushy as hell in 30 days.
Thanks for the tips!

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Old 04-26-2013, 12:07 AM   #35
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Sorry, I have no way of taking pics and it won't be set up until we transplant in a couple weeks. I just use normal plumbing PVC fittings.

In the beginning of your irrigation line, install a T-fitting with a screw cap on the "T" part. Install a complementary fitting onto the hose of the pump/tank. Unscrew the cap of the T and hook up the pump line and you're good to go. Anybody considering farming must already have a good sense of ingenuity so I'm sure you'll be able to figure it out

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Old 04-29-2013, 10:57 PM   #36
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@bandt
Okay, thanks yeah ill figure it out.


Hey guys question regarding soil...
So far this is what I have done with the soil for where the plants are going to be going.
We trenched a line across each row where the plants will be going and filled that trench with good rich soil.
In my eyes with all the money and time I have put into this project since then doesn't seem to be quite enough.
I want these plants to strive. When we used an auger to dig the post holes, once we got deep the soil looked really good.
I have a small cultivator, that can be used to brake up the soil.
What I was thinking of doing was buying x amount of yards of top soil and mixing it with mushroom compost and mixing that with sand and then spreading that throughout the whole area. Should I just put it on top of the dirt that is here naturally or should I dig down and then put it in. Or should I just dig a big hole for each plant and fill each hole with the soil mix?

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Old 04-30-2013, 05:34 PM   #37
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It mostly depends on whether you meant "strive" or "thrive". If "strive" then just sit back, you're all good man.

However, if you want them to thrive.. How compacted is the soil? Was it pretty difficult to dig into? If so then you should cultivate wherever you want the roots to grow. If you plant the hops in nice loose soil and then the roots hit a bunch of hard compacted soil, it's like running into a brick wall. I think the soil amendments should be worked into the soil, sitting on top won't help the roots at all. The amount of soil amendments really depends on what the soil is like at this point and how much you want to be fertilizing in the future.

I don't know your specific situation, but I believe in most cases sand is not imported as a soil amendment. If you have clay soils, the amount of sand needed to change the soil texture into a clay-loam or something like that is often prohibitive. But like I said, I don't know your situation, maybe you have access to a ton of sand and have a way to easily incorporate it? If you do have heavy clay soils with a lot of sodium, consider adding gypsum as well.

Again, I'm not a hops farmer, but these are general agricultural practices. I'm also unclear if you are doing this just as a hobby or for actual production.

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Old 05-01-2013, 03:09 AM   #38
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Hell of a start from nothing. Your gonna have your hands full come harvest time lol. I started hops this year as well. But no where near the scale u have. I have only 7 plants. Look forward to the season and seeing how it goes. Cheers.

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Old 05-13-2013, 07:05 PM   #39
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Soo its been a while, and Im sure you could guess why. We have been so busy trying to get all this stuff done so we can get these plants out of pots and into the ground that I haven't had much time to get on here to discuss it. So last time I was on here I was asking about soil etc.. I ended up getting a soil test done and it came out to be pretty good I guess so my local nursery made me 13 yards of amendment to add to my soil. As you can see from previous pictures are original plan for the plant trenches was to use a small conventional trencher which is probably only about 6 inches wide. We decided we weren't happy with that and wanted to bigger especially after putting our plants into pots, know I gotta fit that whole root ball under ground. So we rented an execavator and dug 4, 70 foot long trenches about 2 feet wide and 18 inches deep. It rained pretty good for a few days so the all the dirt got nice and soft. (this was all last weekend). Yesterday we finished up mixing our soil amendment with our current soil and filled our trenches. We had to rent a bobcat for the weekend to mix almost 30 yards of dirt which took fooooorever. We finished the job just before having to return the bobcat. We came up a little short, like I said we were able to fill the trenches but we wanted to have the rows humped for ease of trimming rhizomes in the future. So today I am bringing home 4 more yards of amendment to mix and make our humps. We also lined each trench with gopher wire before putting the soil in. It was 100 degrees yesterday so it was hard work but were getting closer and closer each weekend. This week we plan on getting all our humps done then this weekend our first goal is to get all our twine up (100 20ft lengths). And a brief update on the plants. (all cascades are up and strong, all horizon look small but very bushy and are starting to grow very fast, The centennial is starting to take off now, the shoots are pretty thick, and out of 25 zeus only 8 have came up and the rest have shown nothing. (But the ones that did come up just started to recently.

img_20130504_131044_388.jpg   img_20130507_190200_182.jpg   img_20130507_190210_099.jpg  
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Old 05-20-2013, 03:41 PM   #40
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Cool man, thanks for the update! Keep uploading pictures when you have the time, I'd love to see how this turns out for you. BTW, what're you planning to do with the harvest?

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