The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Hops Growing > Cascades & Chinooks - 5th Summer

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 07-02-2013, 11:39 PM   #21
nvrstck
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
nvrstck's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Chesapeake, Virginia
Posts: 88
Liked 10 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 21

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rjmaster19 View Post
I bought some rhizomes from LHBS, is there a way to tell how "old" they are? This is what I'm getting at, the first year the cones are supposed to be minimal. But since their rhizomes, they're from a plant that could already be a few year old, furthermore that plant could have been from rhizomes that were a few year old... and so on. Unless you're growing from seeds, your rhizomes are from an "old" plant.

Maybe I just don't understand the concept behind rhizomes...
You don't want to grow hops from seeds because you will get female plants (good) and male plants (bad). The male plants will cross-pollinate everything and you'll end up with a bunch of hops that are all the same. Only female hops from rhizomes are good for brewing beer (unless you know how to cull the male plants). Anyways, I think as far as age of plants goes, whether you have rhizome or a hop seed that is planted it takes a while for it to establish a big root system and really get going. I'm a first year hop farmer myself and started with 5 rhizomes in pots this year. I transplanted 3 into the ground in a permanent location after several weeks and I was amazed at how large the roots had already grown...I imagine now that they are huge. Maybe an analogy would be like the growth phase of yeast during fermentation...it could start fermenting sugars right away, but first it takes some time to build a nice solid foundation (large yeast colony) then it goes to work eating sugar and making alcohol and CO2.
__________________
nvrstck is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-06-2013, 02:40 PM   #22
causeimthesquid
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Merrimack, New Hampshire
Posts: 142
Liked 21 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 45

Default

nvrstck- That's not entirely accurate. You don't want to grow hops from seed because it will be a completely new variety of hop with little predictability as to the quality of the cone. Hops are gigantic monocultures. Every Cascade hop comes from the same plant via rhizome propagation. You cannot grow Cascade hops by seed.

People involved with the USDA and University of Oregon have been experimenting with hops for decades now. Most of the hops they develop are simply given a number to identify them. Once it is discovered that Female XXX is a desirable hop for brewing, it will then be further cultivated and given a sexy name.

As for hop roots, make sure you want them in your yard because once you plant them, you could be stuck with them forever. Just think about how much growth there is above the surface, the same amount of growth is going on below the surface too.

__________________
causeimthesquid is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-08-2013, 08:36 PM   #23
dhuggett
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 57
Liked 14 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 49

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stokes_ View Post
1st year hop grower here. I've got 2 cascade, 1 nugget, 1 Zeus, 1 Centennial, and one mystery plant(it's either Magnum or Chinook). All are doing well, but the Cascade especially grows like nothing I've ever seen before, it's a monster. Nugget seems to be a fast grower as well. I'll take a pic of my set up, I recently finished it and have to wrap the vines up(before they were growing up tomato stakes).

Since they're growing so well, next March I plan on ordering about 50 rhizomes and will sell fresh hops to the local home brew shops/farmers markets/beer festivals/etc... My job permits me to have Summers off and growing these have been quite enjoyable.
I live in Roanoke, VA and would more than happy to purchase some of your hops in the future! Good luck!
__________________
dhuggett is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-15-2013, 07:03 AM   #24
JFK
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: michigan
Posts: 171
Liked 16 Times on 14 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

I'm growing first year plants and I'm shocked yours haven't tried to climb that willow tree. Mine grew up my lattices and before I knew it up into the damn tree above it lol. I have some cone development now and 2 plants over 15 feet tall each. I'm not expecting to actually get hops off them as they are first years. I'm actually surprised to even see cone growth tbh.

__________________

Primary -
Conditioning - 5 gallons Oak Aged Sweet Tart Cherry melomel, 4 1 gallon variations of my Hops Mead.
Bottled - Choujiu (Chinese Rice Wine), Hefe, Godzilla IPA
Kegged - Godzilla IPA
On Deck - Choujiu (Chinese Rice Wine), Cream Soda for the wife n kids, German Style Pilsner with Michigan Hops,
Gone - to many to list.

JFK is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-18-2013, 07:21 PM   #25
The Soft Underbelly
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Joliet, Il
Posts: 218
Liked 9 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 19

Default

So it's been sometime since I've been able to reply to this thread. Its great to see so many other local Illinois brewers! I want to thank everyone for the great feedback and the good discussions this has sparked in general.

So here's where the cascades are today... as JFK indicated above, they eventually grew into the willow tree. About a week after i posted the first shots my wife and I had to prune the MF outta that willow. You wouldnt know it too look at these shots.

The hops on the rain barrels are about 3 years old, since I never got around to patching the leaks in 'em this spring, I never put up any sort of trellising, just propped up some of the larger willow branches

My long term goal is to eliminate the cascades from near the willow and them growing around the pergola over the patio and the fence along side, I planted rhizome cuttings this spring...

The shots are a bit fuzzy, but given the oppressive heat and my unwillingness to remove my sunglasses... well... deal with it!

cascade-1-07.18.13.jpg   cascade-2-07.18.13.jpg   rain-cascades-07.18.13.jpg   pergola-cascade-1-07.18.13.jpg   pergola-1-07.18.13.jpg  

__________________
The Soft Underbelly is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-18-2013, 07:31 PM   #26
The Soft Underbelly
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Joliet, Il
Posts: 218
Liked 9 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 19

Default

The Chinooks are looking really good. I'm excited to make a stout with these come fall.

I've been feeding all the hops in my yard a mix of the Alaskan Fish Emulsion (5-1-1), Unsulfured Blackstarp Molasses (good source of Phosphates and micro nutes) and top dressing one or twice with a hand shovel or two of hardwood ash. This and the compost I add every spring has been pretty good to me so far...

The robin you'll see at the end is Byoncee (wife chose the name... just sayin'!) she built her nest atop the light near my fort door and FREAKS the F- out when ever I'm so selfish as to want to walk in and out.

chinook-1-07.18.13.jpg   cascade-2-07.18.13.jpg   chinook-cones-07.18.13.jpg   chinook-gnome-07.18.13.jpg   byoncee-07.18.13.jpg  

__________________
The Soft Underbelly is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-18-2013, 09:11 PM   #27
TangoHotel
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Colorado Springs, Colorado
Posts: 1,160
Liked 74 Times on 65 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Soft Underbelly View Post
The Chinooks are looking really good. I'm excited to make a stout with these come fall.

I've been feeding all the hops in my yard a mix of the Alaskan Fish Emulsion (5-1-1), Unsulfured Blackstarp Molasses (good source of Phosphates and micro nutes) and top dressing one or twice with a hand shovel or two of hardwood ash. This and the compost I add every spring has been pretty good to me so far...

The robin you'll see at the end is Byoncee (wife chose the name... just sayin'!) she built her nest atop the light near my fort door and FREAKS the F- out when ever I'm so selfish as to want to walk in and out.
Hey, if your willing to let some of that beautiful Cascade and Chinook go, I'll happily take those off your hands. Well rhizomes at least. :-)
__________________
TangoHotel is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-19-2013, 02:01 PM   #28
nvrstck
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
nvrstck's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Chesapeake, Virginia
Posts: 88
Liked 10 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 21

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stokes_ View Post
Since they're growing so well, next March I plan on ordering about 50 rhizomes and will sell fresh hops to the local home brew shops/farmers markets/beer festivals/etc... My job permits me to have Summers off and growing these have been quite enjoyable.
I'm pretty sure you can cut your own rhizomes from your plants after cutting them back in the fall, so you won't have to buy as many
__________________
nvrstck is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cascades Paulasaurus Hops Growing 9 01-13-2011 04:58 PM
What is growing in my Chinooks Foovanadil Hops Growing 10 04-26-2009 08:20 PM
Would anyone pay $40 for a # of Cascades? zman Recipes/Ingredients 9 03-20-2009 06:06 PM
My cascades! Yooper Hops Growing 18 11-10-2008 10:30 PM