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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Hops Growing > Bines splitting, whats the cause?
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Old 07-03-2012, 04:49 PM   #1
jfrank85
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Default Bines splitting, whats the cause?

I recently found one of my cascade bines with what appears to be a split about half way up one inch long. What could have caused this you think? Too much watering or nutrients? The bine that has the split btw is loosing all of its leafs and is dying back.

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Old 07-03-2012, 08:21 PM   #2
brian2can
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I hope this helps and again I hope it is not the case for you but this is what I found when I did a google search for stem splitting.

From
http://www.crannogales.com/HopsManual.pdf
Part 1#####
Verticillium Wilt
Most vegetable growers will be familiar with the fungal infection Verticillium wilt, as it affects a wide range of
vegetables as well has hops. The first symptoms usually appear fairly late in the season, as the hops are maturing and often when the cones are half-grown. Leaves will yellow and wither, with the lower leaves turning yellow first. Bines infected with Verticillium wilt will eventually turn entirely brown and will lose their whole crop of hops. Browning and thickening of the lower stem, with splitting of the bine or peeling bark is a constant feature, along with an excessively firm attachment of the bine to the crown, so that when a section of diseased bine is pulled away, a piece of the crown comes with it.
This disease is resident in the soil, so that even if diseased bines are removed and clean bines planted in the
same place, the disease will return to the clean stock. Fuggle is one of the most susceptible varieties, so if the
disease presents itself in a Fuggle yard, it may be necessary to change to another variety.
Water-logging seems to be the most common carrier of this disease. Water must not be allowed to stand on the surface near the base of the plants in wet weather.


Part 2####

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Originally Posted by damdaman View Post
Hmm, to me that looks like a split that is caused by lack-of-water-stress followed by large amounts of water being dumped into the soil. What I've seen happen with other plants is that the soil gets too dry and the plant goes into water stress. The gardener figures out at some point they've been neglecting giving the plant water, so they dump tons and tons of water into the soil all at once. The plant then sucks up as much water as it can, causing it to swell up and crack.

Don't know about the browning cones, maybe they're just ready to harvest?
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Old 07-03-2012, 09:17 PM   #3
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We have been having 95°+ weather for the past 2 weeks straight. Weird thing is, the leafs are still green above the split and they have browned and fallen off below it. All other bines are healthy and good. Also this was the first growth bine from the year, i didnt cut back the first growth like i should have and it reached 10ft very quickly. Maybe this is the cause?

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Old 07-03-2012, 09:28 PM   #4
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I did not cut back any of my early ones either. I just make sure to give some water in the morning and some at night. Here are pic of my cones i picked today and check out the 2012 Hop cone links to look at the hops. Slow and steady wins the race. I try not to over water and this year i started spraying the leaves just to cool them off. I water around 5:00 pm then check in am around 7 and maybe spray the soil. But at least 2 a week leave the drip system on for 4 hours at 2gph


http://www.homebrewtalk.com/photo/20...nes-55493.html

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Old 07-03-2012, 09:44 PM   #5
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Watering is indeed an issue. I cant water in the morning since i work at 4 am and i cant water until 6pm because thats when i get off. I need to invest in a dripper with a timer to remedy that issue. I may have been over compensating with the water due to the lack of rain for the last 3 weeks plus the high temp weather.

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