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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Hops Growing > 100% homegrown
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Old 07-13-2013, 03:45 PM   #221
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Well the modern strains are bred to grow short. Although I noticed with barley, even heritage ones are much shorter than wheat.

This is a heritage wheat variety. It should be much taller and one of the reasons why I chose it is for the quality of the straw. I very much suspect that the seed bank has a mis-classified strain here.

Back to the barley... My Hana is not doing fantastic. The leaves are a little yellow. Too wet? They're growing close to the Einkorn, which is also struggling.

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Old 08-09-2013, 08:55 PM   #222
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I just wanted to say that drumstickk is a bad ass, and sent me beer from the batch that he grew and malted. It rocked! Great job man! Even my wife drank some out of respect for the work that sent into it, and liked it! The only flaw was that the head retention wasn't there

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Old 08-12-2013, 06:15 AM   #223
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Originally Posted by mlsuggs View Post
That was something I also saw with my barley--even the M.O. only got up to about 2ft tall, maybe a little more. Lots of commercial wheat planted hereabouts, tho, and it appears to be largely the same-ish height as my stuff, so I'm not worried.

--Misha
I think a lot of the height depends on nitrogen content in the soil and growing conditions rather than just genetics.

I would also echo others that height doesn't really matter. I think my crop was especially tall because I grew a spring variety of barley in the winter. It had an especially long (if not warm) growing season, and had plenty of time to devote to vegetal growth. I've seen plenty of commercial crops that are much shorter, just a few feet high.

Height can have an impact on final protein content in the grain: if you fertilized and you expected the plants to consume a certain amount of nitrogen during elongation, and then, they don't elongate very much -- well, there could be more nitrogen left in the soil than you expected during grain formation. This would lead to an increase in protein content in the grains, which a maltster might notice, but you or I probably wouldn't!

So, really, don't worry about the height. In fact, you don't want them to grow too high because they'll lodge, or tip over, which is not lethal, but a big pain in the butt.
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Old 09-23-2013, 04:37 PM   #224
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Okay, this year's iteration is off and running! SWMBO "sacrificed" one of our garden beds to the barley (with the understanding that I'll be building an additional one to expand the garden), and I got the winter barley varieties planted (Maris Otter and Halcyon).

From the 5g packets I got from the USDA, my yield was ~240g of each variety; I planted ~200g each, saving some so that in case of disaster I can re-build. That policy has already come in handy, as one of my dogs dug up a part of the Halcyon bed before I could get the electric fence up... In retrospect, tho, that portion of bed probably has everything planted to the "proper" depth and such now, so it's not really a loss.

To add to that, we had a nice, gentle soaking rain overnight on Saturday; a quick inspection yesterday showed that all of the grains still visible at the surface were chitting. Certainly says good things about the viability of this stuff!

Now, to finish the trellising for next year's hops...

--Misha

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Old 09-23-2013, 06:50 PM   #225
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Wow, I just finished harvesting my Hana and Golden Promise over the weekend.

In hindsight, I planted in an area that was too damp. Next year will need to be different. My yields were much lower than yours. I'll have to weigh them tonight to see exactly what they were. Golden promise produced easily 3 times more than my Hana though.

It's a spring barley used traditionally in Scotland for making malt whiskey.

Edit:
so I got home and broke out the scales...

My Hana came in at 12g, so a little over twice what I started with.
The Golden promise came in at 28g, or 5 1/2 times.

Interestingly, they were growing about 10ft apart and separated by a patch of beans. Maybe the Golden Promise is more suited to damper conditions. Like Scotland :-)

One thing I have noticed was that the seed I started with looked pretty old. Especially the Hana.
I also planted Einkorn and Pacific Bluestem wheat. The Einkorn looked particularly haggard when I got it (all 10 berries) and the germination rates were poor.

So although my yields were somewhat disappointing (apart from the GP), at least I now have fresh seed for next season!

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Old 09-24-2013, 08:12 PM   #226
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I stumbled across this:
http://sciencebusiness.technewslit.com/?p=13503

After a bit more googling, I came to the conclusion that I just have to get my hands on some Chevallier seed!

I planted the Golden Promise thinking that it was a pre industrial barley only to find out that isn't the case, and it was actually created by blasting seed with radiation. Not really the effect I'm after...

This looks like the real deal for making historically authentic IPA etc. I think I may have even found it in the Canadian seed bank.

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Old 09-27-2013, 12:59 PM   #227
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Quote:
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My Hana came in at 12g, so a little over twice what I started with.
The Golden promise came in at 28g, or 5 1/2 times.
Yeah, my Spring barley had much lower yields than my winter barley (about 25-50g for the spring, versus almost 250g for the winter). Probably related to the longer growth period/more established root system in the winter barley; it's got all winter to "settle in".

So, my winter barley was sown on Sunday; the first shoots are already nearly 2" long! I'm keeping an eye on the weather forecasts; hoping that our first frost comes late enough to let the plants get established, but not so late that they're too far along in the growth cycle... I suppose things will work out one way or the other, when all is said and done. Hopefully the yields are similar to last year!

--Misha
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Old 11-16-2013, 01:17 AM   #228
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I just wanted to say that drumstickk is a bad ass, and sent me beer from the batch that he grew and malted. It rocked! Great job man! Even my wife drank some out of respect for the work that sent into it, and liked it! The only flaw was that the head retention wasn't there
Is... is that a thunderhead??
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Old 11-16-2013, 03:12 AM   #229
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Farside View Post
I stumbled across this:

I planted the Golden Promise thinking that it was a pre industrial barley only to find out that isn't the case, and it was actually created by blasting seed with radiation. Not really the effect I'm after...
Cool! I will have to get my hands on some Chevalier

Regarding the radiation, keep in mind that pre-industrial crops were produced in a very similar manner to modern radiation-produced crops. They are both made by creating variation with ionizing radiation, then selecting desirable traits from the produced variation.

In pre-industrial crops, the source of ionizing radiation is gamma rays from the sun -- in post-industrial crops, it is gamma or x-rays from a radioactive metal. You gotta remember that the radiation doesn't know what type of source it came from: a gamma ray is a gamma ray.

Pre-industrial humans selected grains for size, plumpness, disease resistance, pest resistance, and desirable growing and harvesting characteristics, just like modern breeders do. In fact, when you compare pre-industrial grains to un-domesticated grains like goatgrass, you see that pre-industrial breeders really made the hugest changes to the crops. Modern breeders have only eked out a little more yield.

Anyway, I love the historical crops too -- I'm hoping to plant my old bere barley seed crop this winter! (Fingers crossed). But don't eschew radiation-bred crops, because...well, all crops are radiation-bred. That's how evolution works.
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Old 11-16-2013, 05:31 AM   #230
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