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-   -   Great Dry Sparkling Cider (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f81/great-dry-sparkling-cider-117241/)

Echo2112 05-02-2009 07:36 PM

Great Dry Sparkling Cider
 
Had been wanting to do a nice dry cider, with noticeable apple notes to it, but not too much sweetness. This was a very simple recipe to put together, the key is to give this time to age, it can be less than pleasant the first month in the bottles. If you give it time, and wait 3 to 4 months, you will have an absolute stunner.



5 Gallons unfiltered Organic Apple Cider (from grocery store)
2 lbs local wildflower honey

1 tube White Labs #WLP775 Dry English Cider yeast
5 tsp Fermax yeast nutrient

OG 1.050
FG.996
ABV 7.04%

Beersmith put the SRM at 6.0, but I really feel that it is closer to a 3 or 4.

After sanitizing, I put the Cider right into the primary fermenter, no heating or boiling at all.

Warm the honey in about 2 cups of hot (150F) water to liquefy it, and add the Fermax to the honey / water mix. Don't boil the honey!

Let the honey mix cool a bit, and then add it to the primary. Pitch your yeast on top. When I did this, I did not use a starter, so it took several days for fermentation to kick off. Next time I will make a 1000mL starter. Shake the baby like mad to aerate!

Let sit on primary for 2 weeks. Rack into secondary for 1 week to clarify and let things settle out. I then racked into a bottling bucket, added in priming sugar and then into flip top bottles.

After 4 months, this is probably the best cider I have ever had. Beats Woodchuck and Ace all to hell. I was trying to copy the Samuel Smith Organic Cider and I would have to say that I am more than happy with what I have here.

Samuel Smith uses a wine yeast in the cider they make, but the White Labs I used worked wonderfully. Same crisp light flavor, dry, but not overly so.

I am going to get another batch of this going this week, after getting into several bottles this weekend, and having some friends and in-laws over, my stock is dwindling.

jdwest32 06-07-2009 05:38 PM

I did something very similar to this. I used...
5 gal of organic unfiltered Apple Juice.
1.5Lbs local honey
2 tea bags
lemon, 1 lime
tsp yeast nutrient
Brewing salts and Irish moss

My O.G of the juice was 1.052 but with the 1.5lbs of honey it was 1.09. that sounds too high but that is what it read. maybe the suspended stuff had too big of an influence. i dont know i am a little puzzled.
2 weeks I racked and added 64oz of Pear juice. Gravity before adding the pear juice was 0.999

It is very cloudy. I tasted it. It is very dry and bitter. it smells pretty bad too. it is young so i am hoping it will get better. That was 2 weeks ago and it is still just as cloudy. I am thinking about racking again.

shanewheel 06-21-2009 09:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Echo2112 (Post 1299086)
Had been wanting to do a nice dry cider, with noticeable apple notes to it, but not too much sweetness. This was a very simple recipe to put together, the key is to give this time to age, it can be less than pleasant the first month in the bottles. If you give it time, and wait 3 to 4 months, you will have an absolute stunner.



5 Gallons unfiltered Organic Apple Cider (from grocery store)
2 lbs local wildflower honey

1 tube White Labs #WLP775 Dry English Cider yeast
5 tsp Fermax yeast nutrient

OG 1.050
FG.996
ABV 7.04%

Beersmith put the SRM at 6.0, but I really feel that it is closer to a 3 or 4.

After sanitizing, I put the Cider right into the primary fermenter, no heating or boiling at all.

Warm the honey in about 2 cups of hot (150F) water to liquefy it, and add the Fermax to the honey / water mix. Don't boil the honey!

Let the honey mix cool a bit, and then add it to the primary. Pitch your yeast on top. When I did this, I did not use a starter, so it took several days for fermentation to kick off. Next time I will make a 1000mL starter. Shake the baby like mad to aerate!

Let sit on primary for 2 weeks. Rack into secondary for 1 week to clarify and let things settle out. I then racked into a bottling bucket, added in priming sugar and then into flip top bottles.

After 4 months, this is probably the best cider I have ever had. Beats Woodchuck and Ace all to hell. I was trying to copy the Samuel Smith Organic Cider and I would have to say that I am more than happy with what I have here.

Samuel Smith uses a wine yeast in the cider they make, but the White Labs I used worked wonderfully. Same crisp light flavor, dry, but not overly so.

I am going to get another batch of this going this week, after getting into several bottles this weekend, and having some friends and in-laws over, my stock is dwindling.

That sounds like a great recipe. What temperature did you ferment at?

rossthefireman 01-19-2010 05:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Echo2112 (Post 1299086)
Had been wanting to do a nice dry cider, with noticeable apple notes to it, but not too much sweetness. This was a very simple recipe to put together, the key is to give this time to age, it can be less than pleasant the first month in the bottles. If you give it time, and wait 3 to 4 months, you will have an absolute stunner.



5 Gallons unfiltered Organic Apple Cider (from grocery store)
2 lbs local wildflower honey

1 tube White Labs #WLP775 Dry English Cider yeast
5 tsp Fermax yeast nutrient

OG 1.050
FG.996
ABV 7.04%

Beersmith put the SRM at 6.0, but I really feel that it is closer to a 3 or 4.

After sanitizing, I put the Cider right into the primary fermenter, no heating or boiling at all.

Warm the honey in about 2 cups of hot (150F) water to liquefy it, and add the Fermax to the honey / water mix. Don't boil the honey!

Let the honey mix cool a bit, and then add it to the primary. Pitch your yeast on top. When I did this, I did not use a starter, so it took several days for fermentation to kick off. Next time I will make a 1000mL starter. Shake the baby like mad to aerate!

Let sit on primary for 2 weeks. Rack into secondary for 1 week to clarify and let things settle out. I then racked into a bottling bucket, added in priming sugar and then into flip top bottles.

After 4 months, this is probably the best cider I have ever had. Beats Woodchuck and Ace all to hell. I was trying to copy the Samuel Smith Organic Cider and I would have to say that I am more than happy with what I have here.

Samuel Smith uses a wine yeast in the cider they make, but the White Labs I used worked wonderfully. Same crisp light flavor, dry, but not overly so.

I am going to get another batch of this going this week, after getting into several bottles this weekend, and having some friends and in-laws over, my stock is dwindling.

I made this recipe last night, but used a 1/2 teaspoon of DAP yeast nutrient from More Beer instead of the Fermax.
I also used Mesquite honey.
I didnt use a starter at all but I have fermentation starting at 14 hours.
here's to your recipe, hope it turns out for me!

mcpowell33 03-16-2010 04:25 PM

how much priming sugar did you use? the same as you would for a 5 gallon batch of beer?

rossthefireman 04-11-2010 07:29 PM

UPDATE_ this cider has come out extremly well. Everybody seems to love it especially the wife.
For priming sugar I used pure cane sugar and did the math for a five gallon batch.

jmitch1000 04-13-2010 07:43 PM

cider Q
 
Hi there,
In the process of making my first sparkling cider...primary ferment of organic apple juice for about 2 weeks, then racked and bottled with corn sugar. After about 2 more weeks in the bottle I gave one a try...it was super carbonated but not the most delicious thing ever. Heavy ferment smell, pretty tart. My impression is that the rest just needs to age, but for how much longer? I also think I probably should have racked it more than once, but too late now! Any advice?

fugazzi 09-13-2010 02:59 PM

Just thought I'd post a few notes from my experiences.

I've made this recipe five times, the first with superduper organic cider, the next three with Apple Juice from concentrate, and I have another actual cider fermenting now.

I used farmer's market honey on the first batch with the organic cider, but just use the storebought honey now. I'm also using the Danstar Nottingham yeast, as that's what I have around these days.

Plan for 2 months total (at least) for this cider to be drinkable, 2 in primary, 2 in secondary (a must if you use cider instead of apple juice), and a month at least in bottles (no kegs yet). If you drink before then, which I did, the cider is very very bright and almost on the edge of sour. I have drank about 6 weeks in the bottle and the flavor balances out a lot, while still being a great cider.

I found that using organic cider makes a better end product. However, apple juice is an acceptable substitute. And considering the cider around here was $6/gal and aj was around $2/gal, there was no real contest for us. So my first batch cost around $40, and switching to aj costs around $15. Keep in mind, however, that cider is seasonal, so you may be able to pick it up cheap at some point.

Thanks for the great recipe!

rossthefireman 10-02-2010 10:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fugazzi (Post 2272573)
Just thought I'd post a few notes from my experiences.

I've made this recipe five times, the first with superduper organic cider, the next three with Apple Juice from concentrate, and I have another actual cider fermenting now.

I used farmer's market honey on the first batch with the organic cider, but just use the storebought honey now. I'm also using the Danstar Nottingham yeast, as that's what I have around these days.

Plan for 2 months total (at least) for this cider to be drinkable, 2 in primary, 2 in secondary (a must if you use cider instead of apple juice), and a month at least in bottles (no kegs yet). If you drink before then, which I did, the cider is very very bright and almost on the edge of sour. I have drank about 6 weeks in the bottle and the flavor balances out a lot, while still being a great cider.

I found that using organic cider makes a better end product. However, apple juice is an acceptable substitute. And considering the cider around here was $6/gal and aj was around $2/gal, there was no real contest for us. So my first batch cost around $40, and switching to aj costs around $15. Keep in mind, however, that cider is seasonal, so you may be able to pick it up cheap at some point.

Thanks for the great recipe!

I used organic cider as well and echo your statements. This thing aged beautiffuly. I have none left and the wife is all over me to make more. This recipe is great!

LadyStabbsalot 08-15-2011 04:10 PM

I started a dry cider about a month ago, a few days ago transferring it to the secondary carboy. I also added more apple juice mostly because I wanted more cider but also to see if I could cut the dryness a little. it seems to be fermenting still (some airlock movement) but there is something floating on top. dunno if it is an infection but if it is what do I do? It smells fine havent tasted it yet... if I bottle now can I save it?


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