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Old 12-08-2011, 04:47 PM   #61
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I am planning on taking a swing at this recipe this weekend. I have one question, I am using a 6.5 g carboy as my primary and wonndered how much head space I will need for all the lively yeast activity. To be more specific if I were to make this a 6 gallon batch would the .5 gallon head space be enough? or if I make the 4 gallon batch is 2.5 g too much head space, does it matter?

Thanks for the replies.

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Old 12-08-2011, 08:10 PM   #62
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With its spending only a few days in primary, i don't think too much space should be a problem half a gallon should be enough space for krausen in my experience with this recipe, but even if you get spillover it isnt the end of the world of course

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Old 12-08-2011, 10:20 PM   #63
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I made a 5 gallon batch in a 5 gallon better bottle. It has maybe 4 inches tops of space and its jamming big time with 0 issues

Sent from my Galaxy S 4G using Home Brew Talk for Android

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Old 12-12-2011, 05:09 PM   #64
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Well I started this one last night with the addition of .5 lb brown and 1 lb white sugar. Started with a gravity of 1.078, going to try and get it to 40 or so and crash it. Then bottle and pasteurize just in time for the weekend. Yay and thanks for fast cider recipe!

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Old 12-12-2011, 08:42 PM   #65
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I've let the bottles sit for a couple weeks, and am really impressed with it now. 4 bottles in this afternoon and I'm happy as a clam. Plotting my next crack at it.

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Old 12-13-2011, 09:35 PM   #66
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Going to try this out tonight. I'm trying to follow the original recipe as much as possible, only difference is once I get the gravity where I want it i'm going to cold crash and keg. Anyone have success doing this?

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Old 12-14-2011, 07:44 AM   #67
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Cold crashing won't kill fermentation. Once it gets back to room temp, fermentation will continue. Chemicals may be able to get the job done after a cold crash and rack, but I'm pretty sure heat is the only way to kill this type of fermentation.

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Old 12-14-2011, 08:18 AM   #68
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Quote:
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I've let the bottles sit for a couple weeks, and am really impressed with it now. 4 bottles in this afternoon and I'm happy as a clam. Plotting my next crack at it.
Mine is still going. Will probably let it ride in the primary for another week (2.5 total) then bottle it.
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Old 12-14-2011, 12:07 PM   #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dayflyer55
Cold crashing won't kill fermentation. Once it gets back to room temp, fermentation will continue. Chemicals may be able to get the job done after a cold crash and rack, but I'm pretty sure heat is the only way to kill this type of fermentation.
Once I rack it into my keg, it will never get back up above 40 degrees. it shouldnt ferment anymore should it?
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Old 12-16-2011, 01:40 AM   #70
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Well I only let mine get to about 44 or so. At that point I was a little pressed for time and I knew I wouldn't be given any quarter by this stuff. Bottled at 44 with full fermentation going and was petrified for the next three hours. I am not sure who posted the hint but definitely put you first bottle in a plastic soda bottle so you can have easily available pressure knowledge or an idea of how high the pressure is getting; this is key and is genius. Also be aware your time frame, you have to bottle and pasteurize same day in most cases so be prepared for a 4 to 5 hour adventure. While stove top pasteurizing is easy it is also time consuming.

Lots of people say overnight or 5 to 6 hours but mine were begging to explode at 2 hrs. This is due to stopping early with 2 packets of yeast and room temp but still it was unexpectedly fast. Holding a bottle up I could notice steady co2 bubbles.

I know it was early and I could have waited for a lower FG but this brings me to a very important point. To all you noobs and beginners; plan this out so you have 1 or 2 days on a weekend to catch it at the right point and bottle. That means start on a tuesday or a Wednesday to be sure you have two available days to "catch" this brew at the correct gravity. Otherwise you will have an upset cider or wife or both.

All in all great recipe and great results. I now see my errors and will be prepared when I next make cider.

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