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Old 07-23-2013, 11:33 PM   #121
lpsumo
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Mine is still slowly fermenting more than 3 months later, waiting is boring...

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Old 07-24-2013, 12:11 AM   #122
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lpsumo
Mine is still slowly fermenting more than 3 months later, waiting is boring...
Holy crap! Did you put the 6 cups of sugar in?

I used mango nectar with 4 cups of sugar but added yeast energizer on top of the nutrient with a half pack of red star premier cuvee. It's chugging away with a bubble every other second at 65*. Might ramp up the temp a bit over the next few days
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Old 08-05-2013, 12:46 AM   #123
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I don't know what its deal is. I racked off the sediment, then strained the sediment and bulked it up with water to a full gallon. It sat in secondary for nearly 3 months, then I racked it to tertiary. It's been slowly bubbling in there since the end of June.

Unfortunately it's in a 1 gallon jug that I can't get a hydrometer into so I have no idea what it's SG is. It started at 1130 but I figured with all the water I used to bulk it up it'll end around 12-14%

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Old 08-05-2013, 04:05 PM   #124
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Hi! I've always like making "interesting" wines, so I've been following this thread with interest! When I saw the pictures I was convinced to try this recipe, so a little over a week ago I decided to take the leap and start a batch for myself. I have some observations but first, let me describe what I did...

My local grocery store had kesar mango pulp on sale for Ramadan -- $1.49 per 30oz can -- so I grabbed 12 cans so I could make a 6 gal batch with twice the fruit. Here's the recipe I used (forgive the mixed units -- I'm Canadian):

12 30 ounce cans of mango pulp (that's about 10.5 L or 2.75 Gal)
6 kg Table Sugar (that's about 13.2 lbs or 24 cups)
12.5 L water (that's about 3.25 Gal)
9 tsp white wine acid blend
3 tsp pectic enzyme
6 tsp yeast nutrient
2 tsp yeast energizer
1.5 tsp tannin
1 pkg Bentonite
1 pkg Lalvin EC-1118 yeast

The recipe as posted above would have called for 36 cups (9 kg) of sugar, but as I was pouring in my third bag I was struck by just how much sugar I was adding. Was this going to be rocket fuel? I stopped there and completed the make and set it to ferment, then I went and did some math. I looked up the brix value for kesar mango pulp (you've got to love the internet) and found it is typically sold to consumers at 18 degrees. This means an SG of 1.075. 6 kg of sugar in 12.5 L of water has an SG of about 1.220, so blended together the mixture had an OG of 1.150. If I fermented this mixture to full dryness it would have about 20% alcohol (although Lalvin EC-1118 tops out at about 18% in perfect conditions).

I like to ferment to dry and then backsweeten if needed, so this is too high for me. What to do? Hmm...cut with water? What about the flavor I was looking for? I thought about this overnight.

It hit me the next morning: start another batch with no sugar added! This would create a batch with an OG of 1.015, which, once started I could blend with the first batch to create two batches with an average OG of 1.082 -- a nice, 10.5% ABV final result.

So, I went and got another 12 cans and started up -- it was so happy it was approaching dry a day later (!), so I grabbed a third primary pail and put half of each batch into it, then poured the remaining second batch atop the first batch. I also used my degassing wand to blend in the fruit caps thoroughly. By this time the original batch had made it down to 1.060 (wow). Blended together the two batches were each at 1.040.

Yesterday I racked both batches down to a couple of 5 gal carboys, blending the batches half and half again for good measure. I used a gallon jug for the excess -- one of my batches got a solidish fruit cap on it, the other was still in suspension, so I had only about a gallon of extra stuff. After an hour or so I noticed some airlock activity. I'll have to check the current SG when it clears a little.

Oh, and when I looked at my receipts from the grocery store I realized I'll get two batches for $36 worth of pulp and $6 worth of sugar. Not bad! Does anyone know what volume of sediment I can expect this to drop?

So -- after all this I wonder perhaps if the original recipe is a little hot? Any thoughts?

I'll throw in some images here:
SG progression


After racking yesterday (oh, and the other carboys are: 3 gal dried elderberry to the left, 6 gal dragon blood to the rear and 3 gal of strawberry to the right)

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Old 08-08-2013, 01:41 PM   #125
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I'm finally fixin to have some room in my "winery closet" in the next couple weeks after I bottle up 3 bulk aging batches. So i'll finally be able to throw this mango pulp wine together. I'm contemplating starting it off in a 2 gallon plastic primary and then rack off into a gallon carboy for the secondary. Keeping the little remaining leftover in a wine bottle for topping up after another racking. Seems like there's a TON of sediment left behind after the initial racking of this wine so this may work out well.

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Old 08-23-2013, 06:07 PM   #126
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I have a one gallon batch and the sediment takes up 1/3 of the jug. Should I expect that loss or how could I maximize the amount I get out of it?

What do you guys think about putting the mango pulp in a mesh bag inside a bucket to ferment? And then remove the bag before siphoning to a glass carboy to age. I want to minimize the amount lost to the mango pulp lees.

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Old 08-24-2013, 08:48 PM   #127
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What about filtering somehow? like siphoning through a cheese cloth or something?

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Old 08-25-2013, 05:49 PM   #128
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I found that there was no filter, screen or other contraption which would allow me to filter the mango pulp - it would jam everything I tried!

I ended up making two batches, so when I was ready I racked them to two 5 gal carboys, the at second racking I racked the clear wine from both carboys into a third carboy, then racked the remainder of the clear to two 1 gallon jugs. As an experiment I consolidated both pulpy masses into one carboy to see if they'd separate and clarify a bit more. They did, but only slightly - there was a large settled mass taking up half the carboy, a thin layer of "clear" liquid, then a large floating mass - a cap, really.

I blended that carboy thoroughly with my degassing tools, which helped to settle the cap. I got about half a gallon of useful wine. which i combined with the two one-gallon jugs in a 3 gal carboy. I tried to filter the rest of the pulp, as I mentioned, but the long, soft fibres of the mango pulp successfully gummed up: nylon stockings, a muslin bag, a wire mesh strainer and a colander. If I had a fruit press I think I could have put it into some cheese cloth and treated it like the pressing a red wine must, but I probably would have ended up squeezing out waaaay too much starch. As it was, my manipulation created quite a starch haze in my 3 gal carboy - I needed a big hit of amylase enzyme and a bit of pectic enzyme to clear it, and as the picture may show it's not quite as clear as the first carboy...

First image: Nice, clear 5 gal carboy
Next, 3 gal carboy still with a faint haze
Then, I just checked the 3 gal again -- looks good!

image-3991256247.jpg   image-803321622.jpg   image-999.jpg  
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Old 09-15-2013, 07:11 PM   #129
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cms2bit View Post
What about filtering somehow? like siphoning through a cheese cloth or something?
I filtered mine through a grain bag, it helped.

I was really disappointed with this one. I finally stopped fermentation a few weeks ago, nearly 6 months after it started. I don't know what the issue was but it bubbled away since March 10th and went from 1.130 to 1.015. I finally used k-meta to stop the yeast, but I find it way too sweet still. It's ok mixed with club soda though, but I probably wouldn't make it again.
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Old 09-16-2013, 06:12 AM   #130
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A couple of my Cranberry wines took forever to ferment and ended a bit on the sweet side too.

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