Home Brew Forums > Recipe Database > HomeBrewTalk.com Recipe Database > Specialty Beer > George Washington's Small Beer

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-26-2013, 05:17 PM   #21
stonecutter2
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
stonecutter2's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 217
Liked 23 Times on 22 Posts
Likes Given: 13

Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thunder_Chicken View Post
I am also reconsidering the weight associated with "a large Sifter full of Bran". I'm not sure how I got that to be 60 lbs.

If the sifter was about 1 bushel in volume,this reference puts bran at about 20 lbs/bushel, not 60 lbs per bushel. That would suggest 0.5 lbs of bran per U.S. gallon, not 2 lbs/gal.

The following might be a much better recipe. At 4% it is a small beer.
Yeah wasn't sure about 60 pounds, 20 pounds makes more sense looking at the example of a sifter you posted.

I'll go with the 0.5lbs of bran in my recipe.

Picking up another jug in the next couple of days. Maybe I should get 2 more and try the 3 hour boil thing...

The ABV of 4% fits more into the small beer category, too. The higher ABV had me curious.
__________________

Primary: JAOM, GW Small Beer v3
Secondary:
Bottled: 15 Minute Cascade Pale Ale, Cream of 3 Crops, George Washington's Small Beer, Sam Adams Holiday Porter Clone
TO DO/BREW: Spruce Beer

stonecutter2 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-26-2013, 11:02 PM   #22
Thunder_Chicken
Registered User
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: The Hinterland of the South Shore
Posts: 2,101
Liked 657 Times on 461 Posts
Likes Given: 178

Default


I think if you go with a 10 oz. bag of the Red Mill Wheat Bran, that will be 0.625 lbs, close enough. The amount of molasses/syrup is pretty specific but the wheat bran amount is an order-of-magnitude estimate.

I'd like to keep updating this thread as the recipe evolves as there is a lot of information being batted around. If you brew this up and get some tasting notes, either I can update this recipe and attribute it to your brew effort, or you can post a new recipe. I'm not quite sure what the etiquette is about this as this is a rather experimental recipe subject to a lot of research and adjustment.

__________________
Thunder_Chicken is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-27-2013, 08:33 PM   #23
stonecutter2
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
stonecutter2's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 217
Liked 23 Times on 22 Posts
Likes Given: 13

Default


Good deal. We'll figure out the best way to capture this once I get my effort rolling. I suggest an update to this post, reflecting different recipes/attempts and results.

I'll definitely keep you updated with my results, keep good notes on what I do and use, etc. Once my fermenters free up in a couple weeks, this is next on my list.

__________________

Primary: JAOM, GW Small Beer v3
Secondary:
Bottled: 15 Minute Cascade Pale Ale, Cream of 3 Crops, George Washington's Small Beer, Sam Adams Holiday Porter Clone
TO DO/BREW: Spruce Beer

stonecutter2 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-30-2013, 12:41 AM   #24
Thunder_Chicken
Registered User
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: The Hinterland of the South Shore
Posts: 2,101
Liked 657 Times on 461 Posts
Likes Given: 178

Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by stonecutter2 View Post
Good deal. We'll figure out the best way to capture this once I get my effort rolling. I suggest an update to this post, reflecting different recipes/attempts and results.

I'll definitely keep you updated with my results, keep good notes on what I do and use, etc. Once my fermenters free up in a couple weeks, this is next on my list.
I'm probably going to kick off another English IPA later this week or next week, and I might try the updated recipe with EKG hops and krausen beer from the IPA soon afterward. I think we've gotten through the major adjustments and maybe can start investigating small tweaks and variations.
__________________
Thunder_Chicken is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-02-2013, 02:34 PM   #25
stonecutter2
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
stonecutter2's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 217
Liked 23 Times on 22 Posts
Likes Given: 13

Default


So, another point that I've been wondering about.

Should the bran and hops be added before the water is boiling, or wait until boiling and then add them? The GW recipe simply says "Boil these for 3 hours" which might mean he got the water boiling, then added them...which I find unlikely. He more likely threw them in the pot and brought it to a boil over the course of 3 hours.

If the bran and hops are brought to a boil over 3 hours time, consider that in order to strain 30 gallons off into a cooler he must have been heating up a lot of water initially - and likely over a wood fire, which would take considerable time. That might roughly equate to a multi-step mash, given the drawn out time of even getting the mash to boil - maybe it allowed for each rest in the process, helping convert the starches.

See the multi-step mash info here (especially the 2nd paragraph after "Do I need a multi-step mash?":
http://beersmith.com/blog/2013/02/08...-home-brewing/

I wonder if the 3 hours time was partly to get the huge amount of liquid to boil, and partly (perhaps luckily) to allow this full multi-step mash process to occur. Though I doubt the exact nature of the multi-step mash was understood, perhaps it simply yielded better small beer when 3 hours were taken to complete the boil step?

A common multi-step mash is 104-140-158F, with 30 minute rests. There's 1 1/2 hours. Then with a 90 minute boil, there's your 3 hours, maybe?

__________________

Primary: JAOM, GW Small Beer v3
Secondary:
Bottled: 15 Minute Cascade Pale Ale, Cream of 3 Crops, George Washington's Small Beer, Sam Adams Holiday Porter Clone
TO DO/BREW: Spruce Beer

stonecutter2 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-02-2013, 10:09 PM   #26
Thunder_Chicken
Registered User
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: The Hinterland of the South Shore
Posts: 2,101
Liked 657 Times on 461 Posts
Likes Given: 178

Default


I tend to think not, as it does say "Boil 3 hours". They also did not know about amylase enzymes and rest temperatures either. I also don't know for certain if the wheat bran itself has any diastatic power to convert its starches. Wheat malt does, but I am not sure about the bran. I think if any conversion of the starches does occur, it is due to thermal breakdown, not enzyme activity. With the new recipe, I think the amount of starch is actually desireable for body.

__________________
Thunder_Chicken is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-03-2013, 02:49 PM   #27
stonecutter2
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
stonecutter2's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 217
Liked 23 Times on 22 Posts
Likes Given: 13

Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thunder_Chicken View Post
I tend to think not, as it does say "Boil 3 hours". They also did not know about amylase enzymes and rest temperatures either. I also don't know for certain if the wheat bran itself has any diastatic power to convert its starches. Wheat malt does, but I am not sure about the bran. I think if any conversion of the starches does occur, it is due to thermal breakdown, not enzyme activity. With the new recipe, I think the amount of starch is actually desireable for body.
Makes sense. I was thinking the timeframe it took to boil might have serendipitously created the enzymes/rest periods, but you make a good point about the wheat bran and diastatic power. I guess the only way to tell is making a batch and experimenting, which is exactly what 1 gallon batches are for.

So, I found a local shop who sells wheat bran in bulk for 99 cents per lb, and Lyle's Golden Syrup was on sale 2/$7.50 11oz bottles I'm set up with ingredients for a couple of batches, including 1oz Liberty and 1oz EKG hops.

This is my plan for my batches. Feedback is most certainly welcome.

0.5lb wheat bran
0.25oz Liberty @ 60min (should I go lower on the bittering?)
0.25oz Liberty @ 10min
1lb Lyle's Golden Syrup @ flameout

I then intend on doing subsequent batches with variations, which I'll take notes on and post/compare the results.

Variations:
-EKG instead of Liberty hops
-1tbsp Grandma's Molasses (Original) at flameout
-Substitute Grandma's Molasses (Original) for Lyle's Golden Syrup
-3 hour boil instead of 60 minutes
-Rest at 104-140-158 and see what difference it makes, if any

Given the relatively cheap nature of making a gallon of this, I think it's going to be fun to try variations until I hit something that's worth gifting around the 4th next year.
__________________

Primary: JAOM, GW Small Beer v3
Secondary:
Bottled: 15 Minute Cascade Pale Ale, Cream of 3 Crops, George Washington's Small Beer, Sam Adams Holiday Porter Clone
TO DO/BREW: Spruce Beer

stonecutter2 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-03-2013, 03:49 PM   #28
Thunder_Chicken
Registered User
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: The Hinterland of the South Shore
Posts: 2,101
Liked 657 Times on 461 Posts
Likes Given: 178

Default


Looks like a good plan to me. I'm not sure about the bittering but your times and amounts look fine - the only way to determine if it will be too bitter will be to try it. It should be much better than my Magnum bitter-bomb anyway!

__________________
Thunder_Chicken is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-07-2013, 02:27 PM   #29
stonecutter2
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
stonecutter2's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 217
Liked 23 Times on 22 Posts
Likes Given: 13

Default


My first attempt is fermenting away. I went with the Liberty hop pellets .25oz @ 60 minutes and .25oz @ 10 minutes.

This recipe is shockingly easy and doesn't have quite the strong aroma typical of boiling wort. As TC mentioned, it smells somewhat like cooking pasta (starchy).

I have some stainless mesh strainer bowls that fit over/into a pot, so I squeezed out the Lyle's into a pot and strained the boiled bran/hops onto the Lyle's syrup.

I find it interesting that Washington made a point of noting to either pour the molasses in the wort, or rather draw it onto the molasses. I like the draw onto molasses option because I'll be straining the bran/hops out anyways, may as well mix the molasses in at the same time and let the boiled stuff help mix it in, right? Maybe the drawing over the molasses part was a way he simplified the process of stirring in the molasses. Since it was an afterthought/specifically mentioned method, I thought I'd go with that approach. I doubt it really matters how the molasses gets mixed in, but I found it interesting that Washington made a point of writing down that variation.

Took a hydrometer reading and it was at 1.061, near what TC had in his attempt (potential alcohol ~8% - pretty high). A sample tasted sweet, and texture was very syrupy. More mead-like texture than wort. Color was a dark straw/almost slightly greenish tint.

Siphoning into the 1 gallon jug revealed that I was about 1 quart or so lower in volume than expected. Perhaps the bran and hops pellets absorbed more than I thought. I allowed the bran/hops to drain thoroughly when straining. I started with 1.25 gallons, so next time I'll start with 1.5 gallons.

So, I boiled some water and cooled to about 87 degrees and topped off the fermenter with exactly 1 quart to get closer to the shoulder of the 1 gallon jug. I shook thoroughly to mix. This brought my hydrometer reading to 1.047 - which means potentially ~6% alcohol. We'll see what it finishes at. This time, a tasting revealed a lightly sweet flavor, very slight hint of hops, and a creamy texture. Color was now more golden.

Pitching the Nottingham at 85 degrees or so made it kick start very fast (used 1/2 of a dry yeast packet). I had some decent foam and bubbling within 20 minutes! The pitching at just more than blood warm must create some interesting flavors/esters from the yeast, too.

It is now bubbling away very happily at around 66 degrees ambient temp. Can't wait to see how it turns out.

__________________

Primary: JAOM, GW Small Beer v3
Secondary:
Bottled: 15 Minute Cascade Pale Ale, Cream of 3 Crops, George Washington's Small Beer, Sam Adams Holiday Porter Clone
TO DO/BREW: Spruce Beer

stonecutter2 is offline  
Thunder_Chicken Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-08-2013, 03:42 AM   #30
Thunder_Chicken
Registered User
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: The Hinterland of the South Shore
Posts: 2,101
Liked 657 Times on 461 Posts
Likes Given: 178

Default


Excellent!

Yeah, the bran does seem to pull in a lot of water. How long was your boil? I got a lot of sticky "glue rafts" towards the end of the 1-hr. boil that I tried to skim out, but then again I used the equivalent of 2 lbs of bran per gallon vs. your 0.5 lbs.

I'm really interested to see how yours comes out. I think there is excellent potential for this to be pretty tasty beer.

__________________
Thunder_Chicken is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
George Washington's Small Beer..? profarm Recipes/Ingredients 3 05-08-2013 01:45 AM
George Washington's beer petie General Beer Discussion 14 09-05-2012 10:09 PM
George Washington's Small Beer Sacdan General Beer Discussion 6 05-05-2011 04:08 PM
George Washington "Small Beer" scottmd06 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 03-13-2011 12:50 AM