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Old 02-07-2013, 04:19 AM   #41
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So some yeast does then need to be added along with dextrose just before bottling?

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Old 02-07-2013, 07:26 AM   #42
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So some yeast does then need to be added along with dextrose just before bottling?
Let it sit a long time on Roselare...12-18 mo recommended by many. Then add yeast and priming sugar like you normally would; there are priming caculators to get the real amount .
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Old 02-07-2013, 11:58 AM   #43
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Would you be are to share a calculator site ?

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Old 02-07-2013, 02:47 PM   #44
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Would you be are to share a calculator site ?
to calculate priming sugar?
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Old 02-07-2013, 03:09 PM   #45
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http://tastybrew.mobify.me/calculators/priming.html
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Old 02-07-2013, 03:15 PM   #46
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Bottle it as your would any other beer, but I would highly recommend adding champagne yeast like eastoak suggested. I bottle all of my sours with it just to ensure proper and prompt carbonation. Think of it as bottling insurance for a buck.

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Old 02-07-2013, 03:33 PM   #47
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Interesting thread, I have a a Rodenbach clone for 13 months in a oad barrel.
We plan to brew a second batch somewhere between now and 2 months. After the primary fermentation, we want to blend part of that young batch with the old batch, and put the other part in the barrel (wich isn't completely emptyed).
At the moment allready a extra smackpackl Roeselare in the fridge

Can someone tell me your experiences on the method we plan to go for?

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Old 02-23-2013, 02:08 AM   #48
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Great! I'm planning on brewing two 5 gallon batches of Flanders more or less following the recipe as posted on page one. For the first batch though I'm adding around 2lbs of unmalted wheat to give the bretts more to work with. I will have the Roselare and an 800ml starter of S-05 pitched together in the primary and then transfer some of the yeastcake over to secondary. The second batch will be pitched on the remaining yeastcake from the first batch. I also have some used oak spirals that were used in red wine; I'll be putting two spirals in each batch in secondary.
For the second flanders batch, I'll follow for the mostpart the same recipe as the first, but less unmalted wheat and likely add instead some flaked maize. I have 1lb of MD that I will add either to just the second batch or split it to some degreee between batches, depending on my SG before racking to secondary. I'm hoping to do some blending and bottle some of it in November and leave the rest for another year or so.

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Old 03-04-2013, 12:46 PM   #49
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So I brewed 30 liters (8 US gallons) of this recipe (mildly modified) this past Saturday, I cooled it down to 16C (~61F) and pitched the Wyeast 3763 blend despite Beersmith's warnings that I should have made a 1.4l starter (for 1.058 OG/30 liters).

I do realize that I underpitched by quite a margin but my lag time was about 30 hours and the fact that my (fresh) Yeast will produce extra esters/phenols/higher alcohols doesn't bother me much since I'm keeping the temperature low and I will let it mature for a loooooong time (as is appropriate for the style).

I'm curious about something: everybody seems to include a "clean ale" yeast at the beginning and/or together with the 3763 blend that already includes an appropriate Saccharomyces strain for the Style.
http://www.wyeastlab.com/hb_yeaststr...ail.cfm?ID=194


"...Specific proportions of a Belgian style ale strain, a sherry strain, two Brettanomyces strains, a Lactobacillus culture, and a Pediococcus culture produce the desirable flavor components of these beers as they are brewed in West Flanders. Propagation of this culture is not recommended and will result in a change of the proportions of the individual components. This blend will produce a very dry beer due to the super-attenuative nature of the mixed cultures."


My question is why?
Why do we want the "clean" strain to eat up most of the fermentables and create a minimal ester/phenol/higher_alcohol profile with just a pittance of fermentables for the "secondary" strains to eat?
Isn't the idea to let the exact bug profile that Wyeast labs have developed to represent a Flander's Red Sour Ale do its work?

I'm genuinely curious as to what the brewmasters here have to say about this...

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Old 03-04-2013, 03:12 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrikos View Post
So I brewed 30 liters (8 US gallons) of this recipe (mildly modified) this past Saturday, I cooled it down to 16C (~61F) and pitched the Wyeast 3763 blend despite Beersmith's warnings that I should have made a 1.4l starter (for 1.058 OG/30 liters).

I do realize that I underpitched by quite a margin but my lag time was about 30 hours and the fact that my (fresh) Yeast will produce extra esters/phenols/higher alcohols doesn't bother me much since I'm keeping the temperature low and I will let it mature for a loooooong time (as is appropriate for the style).

I'm curious about something: everybody seems to include a "clean ale" yeast at the beginning and/or together with the 3763 blend that already includes an appropriate Saccharomyces strain for the Style.
http://www.wyeastlab.com/hb_yeaststr...ail.cfm?ID=194


"...Specific proportions of a Belgian style ale strain, a sherry strain, two Brettanomyces strains, a Lactobacillus culture, and a Pediococcus culture produce the desirable flavor components of these beers as they are brewed in West Flanders. Propagation of this culture is not recommended and will result in a change of the proportions of the individual components. This blend will produce a very dry beer due to the super-attenuative nature of the mixed cultures."


My question is why?
Why do we want the "clean" strain to eat up most of the fermentables and create a minimal ester/phenol/higher_alcohol profile with just a pittance of fermentables for the "secondary" strains to eat?
Isn't the idea to let the exact bug profile that Wyeast labs have developed to represent a Flander's Red Sour Ale do its work?

I'm genuinely curious as to what the brewmasters here have to say about this...
i wonder the same thing. maybe they are skeptical that the sour bugs can fully ferment the beer? i have done both; a 3 liter starter i made from the dregs of russian river's beatification pitched into the wort with no clean yeast. recently i've used wyeast abby ale mixed with russian river and jolly pumpkin dregs. there may be differences in the end but i claim that they are not detectable or if they are not detrimental either way. these souring bacteria and yeast can ferment a variety of sugars that clean yeast can't so even in a secondary they will continue to develop flavors over time. i keep my sours on the yeast for the whole time and if i go to a secondary i always add wood, so far it's worked out great for me.
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