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Old 02-03-2007, 06:53 AM   #1
Brewtopia
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Default Partial - PM - Flanders Red

Recipe Type: Partial Mash
Yeast: Wyeast 3278 Lambic Blend
Yeast Starter: Yes
Batch Size (Gallons): 5
Original Gravity: 1.054
Final Gravity: 1.013
IBU: 15
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60
Color: 24
Primary Fermentation (# of Days & Temp): 30 @ 70 degrees
Additional Fermentation: 1 year @ 70 degrees in keg.
Secondary Fermentation (# of Days & Temp): 180 @ 70 degrees

gilda.jpeg
Flanders Style Red

2 lb Belgian 2 row Pale Malt
10 oz. German Vienna Malt
8 oz. Belgian Cara Vienna Malt
4 oz. Acid Malt
3 oz. Chocolate Malt
3 lbs Light DME
1 lb. Clear Candi Sugar
2 oz. Lactose

.05 oz. Styrian Goldings (60 min.)
.05 oz. Brewer's Gold (15 min.)
.05 oz. Kent Goldings (3 min.)

2 oz. Stavin Med. Toast French Oak Cubes (in the keg)

Mash grain at 150 for 60 minutes. Sparge with 170 degree water.
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Old 08-17-2007, 05:28 PM   #2
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Default Sour Ale Virgin


Hi, I'm trying a Sour for the first time... mostly done porters and pales up till now. I have a couple questions: Is all that aging really necessary? and can i use glass instead of a keg for the tertiary fermentation? and lastly, do I need to innocculate with any [I]L. acidophilus[I] or any other acid producers to achieve the desired result?
thanks,
WaterTower Brewery

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Old 08-17-2007, 05:36 PM   #3
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The Acid Malt along with the Lactose and yeast strain will produce the desired level of sourness. The beer needs to age a long time before the sourness starts to come through. Also, when I brew this beer again I'll use Wyeast 3763 Roselare. This strain wasn't available when I brewed Gilda so I substituted the Lambic Blend. Roselare is Rodenbach's yeast strain and is the more appropriate yeast for the style. Should produce plenty of acidity. Glass will work fine, but be sure and keep the oak on the beer during this whole time. A plastic bucket would actually be ideal since it would allow for the transfer of oxygen which the yeast really needs to produce the desired level of sourness.

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Old 08-20-2007, 12:39 AM   #4
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I dug out my old Papazian to see what he says on the subject, and came across a dusty old Appendix that covers Lactobacillus souring-- says that the appropriate sourness levels can be reached by adding about a half pound of cracked malt to the already-mashed grain (that is, reserve a half pound of the grain bill to be added after the mash) and let it mash for 15-24 hours at 130-135 F. is this method appropriate for a Flemish Ale?

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Old 08-20-2007, 01:00 AM   #5
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I've read and researched a lot on Flanders red ales, and apparently using a bucket actually exposes the beer to more oxygen than is required. This can lead to a premature pellicle drop. The pellicle is formed by the wild yeast and protects the beer from oxidation. The Wyeast Roeselare Blend is the best for this type of beer, but is harder to find.

This is a great resource on Flanders red ales: http://www2.parc.com/emdl/members/ap...shredale.shtml

Check out Aug 3, 2006 1$ barrel: http://www.basicbrewing.com/index.php?page=60

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Old 10-19-2007, 01:52 PM   #6
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stupid question, I know, but how red is your red? What gives Gilda and other Flanders Reds their beautiful color?

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Primary
nothing
Secondary
Date Mead, Oatmeal Cookie Braggot, Fox in Sox Gruit
Aging
Hard lemonade, Cyser, Golden Plum Mead
Ginger-Orange Mead,
Agave Mead, Chocolate/Cinnamon Mead, Heather mead,
Bottled/Drinking
Heather Ale, Emerald Honey Kolsch, Hobgoblin clone, Terror of the Ewes Oatmeal Stout,
Kilt liftin' Wee Heavy, Soggy Doggy English Brown Ale, Saaz/Perle Mead, Cinnamon Mead, Shiraz,
Sauvignon Blanc, white merlot, Elderberry Mead, Vanilla Mead
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Old 10-28-2009, 02:45 AM   #7
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I am looking to brew this beer. I plan on brewing on my birthday this year, and pop her up next bday.

How are the tannins on this beer? I reaaly like tannins, but have never brewed anything with them noticeably present. From my (very) limited understanding I figure tannins come from sparging (too much &/or too hot) & from the oak. Does the oak in this recipe provide much tannins? Or should I fidget around with the sparge to get my tannins.

I am roughly planning on using a plastic bucket. The main downside of the bucket is that I can't watch the pellicle.


I guess I'm reviving a thread that is a bit dated. Brewtopia-not sure if you'll see this, but...I'm bummed I didn't know about your taphouse before. It sounds awesome. We were in seattle last spring & would have dug it. Time for another trip...

Jeff

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Old 03-24-2011, 09:57 PM   #8
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Sorry for ancient thread resurrection, but I had this beer at Hudson pub a couple months back, and it was mighty tasty. Well done! Was the version I enjoyed any different than the recipe above, aside from the switch to Roselare, as you already mentioned?

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Old 04-18-2011, 06:34 PM   #9
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Also resurrecting this one. Brewed a batch three weeks ago and cracked it open this weekend.

Can tell this has the potential to be an awesome beer. I used Roselare Blend and it's got a nice bright taste.

The color for me is way more tawny than red though. Does the color deepen on oak or should I expect it to be about the same from beginning to end?

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Old 04-18-2011, 06:35 PM   #10
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Err cracked open the primary for a peek i mean, not a bottle.

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