Home Brew Forums > Recipe Database > HomeBrewTalk.com Recipe Database > Sour Ale > All-Grain - Alferman Imperial Berliner Weisse

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-07-2012, 04:19 PM   #121
Morkin
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 314
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by OCBrewin View Post
Brewed this up yesterday. First bacteria inoculation, first no sparge, first no boil, first no chill. What an easy brew day.

Went for a more traditional gravity so I cut the grains and hops down a bit.

4.5# pale us 2-row
3.5# wheat malt
0.75 tettnanger

Protein rest at 118f for 20min. Sacc rest at 148-150f for 60min. Mash out at 165f with remainder of water. This was a very thin mash at that point. Drained without vorloufing into kettle and heated to 185f to pasturize, killed heat, covered and let free fall to 120f (about 4hrs).

Pitched homemade lacto starter (see above post) and within 12hrs this carboy is going nuts! Nice krausen, active airlock, and swirling wort. I am keeping it at temps, 100-110f, in a small sealed bathroom with a small space heater fan pointed at it about 12" away. It's actually holding temps quite well this way, since I don't have a way to heat my term chamber as of yet. Gonna give of the full 48hrs before pitching US-05.

Couple questions:
1. Should I add oxygen at Sacc pitch?
2. Will the time above 140f in the kettle cause DMS?
3. How long in primary after the US-05 is pitched until this might be ready to keg?
To answer your questions:

1) Not sure, I never do oxygen additions other than shaking the carboy.
2) I have never noticed any DMS,
3) That depends on your taste buds and what you think the beer should taste like. I have kegged it after about 4 weeks before, but I think the best choice is to wait about 2-3 months. The reason for this is that I believe the lacto keeps working on sugars that the yeast cannot eat, and so keeps improving the taste of the beer and cleaning up the beer long after the Sac gives out.

My preferred way to package this beer is in Champagne or Belgian bottles for 2 reasons. First, the added wire and cork alongside the thicker bottles assures that I will not get any bottle bombs. Secondly, I can then store these bottles for months to years and actually measure how much it has improved over time. I just found a Gose (similar recipe, different style) of mine from a year and half ago and it is much better than when I first had it.

Try it out and see what works best for you. Post some pictures and updated when you can!
__________________

Drinking - Germann Pumpkin Ale
Primary- Schwarzbier
Secondary - Nothing
Bottled - Gose, Eisbock
Kegged - Nothing
Next Batch -
Planning - Berliner Weisse

Morkin is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2012, 04:28 PM   #122
OCBrewin
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
OCBrewin's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Orange County
Posts: 254
Liked 19 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default


Thanks for the reply. I can say that I am very happy how this is turning out. I am at almost exactly 4 weeks from sacc pitch now and it is very good. I do think that I will let this bulk age for another few weeks before bottling. It is slightly tart, not very sour, and has a nice unfiltered light wheat character to it.

I have decided against kegging this, as I really don't want to deal with having dedicated lines and kegs to sours at this point. My only problem is that since I hardly ever bottle anymore I'm reluctant to invest in more bottling equipment. All I am set up to do at the moment is regular bottles with my 'red baron' style caper. Is there anyway to bottle in thicker style bottles without buying a corker or a new caper?

__________________
OCBrewin is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2012, 08:44 PM   #123
Morkin
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 314
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by OCBrewin View Post
Thanks for the reply. I can say that I am very happy how this is turning out. I am at almost exactly 4 weeks from sacc pitch now and it is very good. I do think that I will let this bulk age for another few weeks before bottling. It is slightly tart, not very sour, and has a nice unfiltered light wheat character to it.

I have decided against kegging this, as I really don't want to deal with having dedicated lines and kegs to sours at this point. My only problem is that since I hardly ever bottle anymore I'm reluctant to invest in more bottling equipment. All I am set up to do at the moment is regular bottles with my 'red baron' style caper. Is there anyway to bottle in thicker style bottles without buying a corker or a new caper?
I have kegged this beer twice, and I have never had dedicated lines. The reason being is that I compleatly disassemble my system and kegs after each use and sanitize it.

That being said, if you do bottle, you can bottle it normally with the regular bottles, but be sure to carb it at a much lower rate than the 3-3.5 that the style usually uses. Go for a normal 2.5-3 and you'll be fine.
__________________

Drinking - Germann Pumpkin Ale
Primary- Schwarzbier
Secondary - Nothing
Bottled - Gose, Eisbock
Kegged - Nothing
Next Batch -
Planning - Berliner Weisse

Morkin is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-08-2012, 05:04 PM   #124
midfielder5
Feedback Score: 5 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 1,364
Liked 50 Times on 47 Posts
Likes Given: 20

Default


When I have a sour beer in kegerator, I just use a sour-dedicated picnic tap. In other words, I don't run the sour beer through my kegerator lines. I have to open the door to get the beer but otherwise no big deal.

__________________
midfielder5 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-09-2012, 12:39 AM   #125
OCBrewin
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
OCBrewin's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Orange County
Posts: 254
Liked 19 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by midfielder5 View Post
When I have a sour beer in kegerator, I just use a sour-dedicated picnic tap. In other words, I don't run the sour beer through my kegerator lines. I have to open the door to get the beer but otherwise no big deal.
I like your style. That might be what I end up doing. I think I'll bottle this one for now since I'm shipping some anyways
__________________
OCBrewin is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-12-2012, 05:00 PM   #126
america
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: seattle
Posts: 150
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default


If I wanted to reuse this yeast on another batch of this same recipe, would i have to boil the beer at all? Or heat up the carboy (using a Fermwrap) for the first few days like I did the first time around?

__________________
america is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-12-2012, 10:47 PM   #127
BootsyFlanootsy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: philadelphia
Posts: 207
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default


what is the typical "grain to glass" time on this?

( if kegging that is )

__________________
BootsyFlanootsy is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-14-2012, 03:52 AM   #128
america
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: seattle
Posts: 150
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by BootsyFlanootsy View Post
what is the typical "grain to glass" time on this?

( if kegging that is )
Mine was ready around the two month mark. But I bottled and went on a 21 day vacation and didn't try it till I got back... But it was pretty much just as good now as it was back then (bottled in 7/23/12).
__________________
america is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-18-2012, 07:15 PM   #129
Wingfan13
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Wingfan13's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 330
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default


2 Questions that I didn't see answered but i may have missed. I am really excited to brew this beer. What kind of grain do I need to use for the starter and what method is everyone using to separate the liquid from the grain in the starter ? A grain bag ?

__________________
Wingfan13 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-20-2012, 01:23 AM   #130
AUEnder
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Fairhope
Posts: 98
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingfan13
2 Questions that I didn't see answered but i may have missed. I am really excited to brew this beer. What kind of grain do I need to use for the starter and what method is everyone using to separate the liquid from the grain in the starter ? A grain bag ?
I just added four ounces of each grain to my order and used a cup of that for the starter. Just used a kitchen sieve to filter the liquid from the grain.
__________________

Primary - American Wheat, Yooper's Centennial Blonde, EdWort's Apfelwein
Secondary - I don't do this anymore
Bottle Conditioning - Traditional Mead
Drinking - Pliny the Elder Clone, 60 Minute IPA, Cascade Pale Ale, Oatmeal Stout, North English Brown Mild, EdWort's Apfelwein

AUEnder is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools