Home Brew Forums > Recipe Database > HomeBrewTalk.com Recipe Database > Belgian and French Ale > All-Grain - Chainbreaker White IPA Clone

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 05-14-2013, 10:58 PM   #31
KevinN
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Portland
Posts: 2
Default


Apologies, I have found this in BeerSmith and updated as nessesary. Sorry for the noise!

__________________
KevinN is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-21-2013, 01:48 AM   #32
saxowam
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
saxowam's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 72
Default


So officially a house constant now after tuning in the recipe for our efficiency. Finally made a starter to save some on the side for the future and this thing is still going crazy after a week in the fermenter. Can hear a bubble almost every 2 seconds coming through the blow off tube. Can't wait for another 5 gallons of this to be ready.

__________________

Primary: WIPA, Fig Quad, Winter Ale
Secondary: RIS on oak chips
Keg: Black Porter and then 6 sad empty kegs

saxowam is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-11-2013, 10:42 PM   #33
m1ke
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: redmond
Posts: 17
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by highgravitybacon View Post
5 ml of lactic acid is an ass and a half load. For just adjusting the mash ph, I normally use about 1.5ml for about 32L of water. Are you tossing it in during mash or adding it in just before the boil?
The 5 ml of lactic acid was added directly to the mash and produced some noticeable sourness. I haven't tried this recipe without the lactic acid, but I can imagine it might lack some complexity.

I'm planning to brew this again soon, but doubt that I'll modify the recipe at all... it seemed very close to Chainbreaker, IMHO.

__________________
m1ke is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-12-2013, 01:34 AM   #34
highgravitybacon
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 902
Liked 205 Times on 144 Posts
Likes Given: 152

Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by m1ke View Post
The 5 ml of lactic acid was added directly to the mash and produced some noticeable sourness. I haven't tried this recipe without the lactic acid, but I can imagine it might lack some complexity.

I'm planning to brew this again soon, but doubt that I'll modify the recipe at all... it seemed very close to Chainbreaker, IMHO.

Thank you for clarifying.
__________________
highgravitybacon is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-01-2013, 12:05 AM   #35
telp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 39
Likes Given: 27

Default


Brewed this recipe yesterday. I had to make a couple substitutions. I could not find Bravo hops so I replaced them with Australian Galaxy hops. I was also unable to find the lactic acid. Besides that, the process went quite smoothly. This was my first recipe where I took the reigns and it was a lot of fun! Definitely one of the harder brews I've tried and I can't wait to taste the final product. Thanks for posting this recipe !

__________________
telp is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-11-2013, 11:20 PM   #36
Marc77
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Kansas City
Posts: 324
Liked 50 Times on 39 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default


The lactic acid portion is quite interesting. From what I've read (and I may be and probably am wrong) lactic acid will keep doing it's work on making a beer sour until the bacteria is killed with the boil.

If that part is true here's what I find interesting. Depending on how fast or slow each brewer gets his wort to that degree where the bacteria is killed a different level of sour will be achieved for each brewer.

Example:
Brewer A has his propane burner right up next to his kettle and uses 5 mL of lactic acid but gets his wort up to boil in say twenty minutes.

Brewer B has his propane burner lower than A and is using a keggle which raises the height even more. Because of this his wort doesn't come to a boil until an hour has passed.

Now if I'm right they've both used the same amount of lactic acid but brewer B's beer will have more of a sour taste?

Saxo would you mind posting your final recipe? I'd be curious to see someone's recipe that's kind of combined both of the original. I'll be making a 10 gallon batch of this...well more like 11 but whatever.

__________________
Marc77 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-12-2013, 12:43 AM   #37
Coff
Feedback Score: 10 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 1,405
Liked 157 Times on 110 Posts
Likes Given: 81

Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc77
The lactic acid portion is quite interesting. From what I've read (and I may be and probably am wrong) lactic acid will keep doing it's work on making a beer sour until the bacteria is killed with the boil. If that part is true here's what I find interesting. Depending on how fast or slow each brewer gets his wort to that degree where the bacteria is killed a different level of sour will be achieved for each brewer. Example: Brewer A has his propane burner right up next to his kettle and uses 5 mL of lactic acid but gets his wort up to boil in say twenty minutes. Brewer B has his propane burner lower than A and is using a keggle which raises the height even more. Because of this his wort doesn't come to a boil until an hour has passed. Now if I'm right they've both used the same amount of lactic acid but brewer B's beer will have more of a sour taste? Saxo would you mind posting your final recipe? I'd be curious to see someone's recipe that's kind of combined both of the original. I'll be making a 10 gallon batch of this...well more like 11 but whatever.
I think you're thinking about Lactobacillus, which lives on the outside of grain in every beer. The difference in a few minutes doesn't make a difference in if the beer is sour or not, it would take 2-3 days for the beer to really sour, see sour mash.

In my batch I didn't use the Lactic acid and loved the beer, 5ml seems like a lot if only for adjusting mash PH but I would guess that was the original reason for it. I don't get any sourness in the commercial version.
__________________

Blog:
http://riverwards.blogspot.com/

Twitter: @ecoffy
Instagram: @ecoff

Coff is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-12-2013, 04:05 AM   #38
midfielder5
Feedback Score: 5 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 1,364
Liked 50 Times on 47 Posts
Likes Given: 20

Default


Lactic acid won't make a beer more sour with more time. You are confusing it with lactobasillus, which like the poster above me stated, is present on grain and you can sour the mash if you don't bring it to a boil within a certain amount of time. The time before souring starts depends on how long the wort is allowed get below around 120-130 (? not sure) degrees.

__________________
midfielder5 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-12-2013, 04:43 PM   #39
Marc77
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Kansas City
Posts: 324
Liked 50 Times on 39 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default


Interesting. I'm still getting into the all grain as I'm in the final stages of setting up my MLT and boil kettle to handle 10 gallon batches. No WAY am I trying to lift a 20 gallon pot with 10 gallons of boiling wort!

Coff, I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on doing a protein rest for the White Malt. The one I'm looking at using is from midwest supplies and says that it requires a protein rest in the mash. I was thinking I could do a protein rest at 125f for 45-60 minutes and sparge your 152f for 60 minutes. But how long did you do your 168f sparge for? I know it says to full boil volume and then do a 90 minute boil. But were you fly sparging? Is it another 60 minutes (I'd be batch sparging).

Thoughts?

__________________
Marc77 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-15-2014, 02:50 PM   #40
Woodbrews
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Arlington
Posts: 222
Liked 16 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default


Has anyone tried this as a BIAB? I'm wondering how BIAB would affect the step mash.

__________________
Woodbrews is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
All-Grain - Snowy Papaya White Manthony Belgian and French Ale 4 06-08-2014 12:33 AM
All-Grain - Hoegaarden Witbier Clone - Pierre Celis White Schlenkerla Belgian and French Ale 74 06-05-2014 10:29 AM
All-Grain - The White Tornado Wit dcott Belgian and French Ale 11 07-02-2012 05:59 PM
All-Grain - Impoverished Belgian White randyisrad Belgian and French Ale 1 01-30-2010 04:10 AM
White Heat Belgian Style Wit Brewtopia Belgian and French Ale 1 07-14-2009 12:54 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS