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-   -   Vixen Weizen Bavarian Hef - 1st place German Wheat 2011 HBT contest (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f70/vixen-weizen-bavarian-hef-1st-place-german-wheat-2011-hbt-contest-240710/)

Zen_Brew 04-19-2011 10:39 AM

Vixen Weizen Bavarian Hef - 1st place German Wheat 2011 HBT contest
 
OK. Nothing earth shattering here. A fairly traditional Bavarian Hef grist. This beer did very well in competition getting a first in style in a local contest with 650 entries, then going to a mini BOS at the regional NHC, and advancing and taking 1st in the HBT contest. In the HBT contest in the finals the beer was about 10 weeks old and the final round got one of the last 2 or 3 bottles before the keg kicked so the beer was definitely getting a bit old at that point.

Recipe follows.

Ingredients Amount Item Type % or IBU
8.0 oz Rice Hulls (0.0 SRM) Adjunct 4.17 %
7 lbs Red Wheat Malt, Ger (3.6 SRM) Grain 58.33 %
3 lbs 8.0 oz Pilsner (2 Row) Ger (2.0 SRM) Grain 29.17 %
1 lbs Munich Malt - 10L (10.0 SRM) Grain 8.33 %
0.50 oz Hallertauer [4.70 %] (60 min) Hops 7.3 IBU
0.50 oz Hallertauer [4.70 %] (30 min) Hops 5.6 IBU
1 Pkgs Weihenstephan Weizen (Wyeast Labs #3068) [Starter 1000 ml] Yeast-Wheat

Beer Profile Estimated Original Gravity: 1.051 SG (1.040-1.056 SG) Measured Original Gravity: 1.052 SG
Estimated Final Gravity: 1.012 SG (1.010-1.014 SG) Measured Final Gravity: 1.009 SG
Estimated Color: 5.7 SRM (2.0-9.0 SRM) Color [Color]
Bitterness: 13.0 IBU (10.0-20.0 IBU) Alpha Acid Units: 4.7 AAU
Estimated Alcohol by Volume: 5.04 % (4.30-5.60 %) Actual Alcohol by Volume: 5.34 %
Actual Calories: 220 cal/pint

Name Description Step Temp Step Time
Acid Rest Add 12.96 qt of water at 123.4 F 112.0 F 10 min
Saccrification Add 1.92 qt of water and heat to 152.0 F over 20 min 152.0 F 60 min
Mash Out Heat to 168.0 F over 10 min 168.0 F 1 min

Carbonation and Storage Carbonation Type: Kegged (Forced CO2) Carbonation Volumes: 2.6 (2.4-2.8 vols)
Estimated Pressure: 12.3 PSI Kegging Temperature: 38.0 F
Pressure Used: - Age for: 1.0 Weeks
Storage Temperature: 38.0 F

pitched yeast @ 62
Ferment 62-64
FG 1.009
Final 2 days of fermentation ramp up to 70 for d rest

The mash profile may look a bit confusing. The beer was done all grain on a HERMS system. Initial mash step was an acid rest at approximately 112 degrees. This helps acidify the mash and lends an acid bite to the finished beer. I have been told it also makes the flavor profile lean a bit more towards cloves over banana.

After the rest at 112 the temperature was ramped up to 152. On my system while ramping at full power and recirculating I move about 1.5 to 2 degrees per minute. So the temp basically went through all the protein rest and high fermentability ranges on it's way to 152 which took about 20 minutes. The temp was then held and recirculated at 152 for an additional 60 minutes, then moved to the boil kettle for a 90 minute boil.

andymi86 06-21-2011 03:07 PM

This looks great, Im going to brew it on Friday...I'll let you know how it goes!

TheBeerist 06-21-2011 11:32 PM

I ghetto mash in a rectangular cooler, so multi-stap mashes aren't exactly the easiest thing to do in the world. I've looked at your recipe, and the Bee Cave Hefe. He does a single-temp mash. Is the acid rest absolutely necessary with the grains you're using?

Zen_Brew 06-21-2011 11:59 PM

Thanx Andymi. Let me know how it comes out.

TheBeerist: No I don't think the acid rest is absolutely necessary. There is some lore that it enhances the clove a bit more than the banana esters but I have not done any comparisons to confirm this. All I know is this beer in 3 batches so far has had a wonderful balance of clove and banana without either being over powering. It has taken 1st in several competitions including NHC first round. It did not place in the NHC finals though. I haven't gotten finals scoresheets, but I suspect it was edged out by some of the old gaurd brewers with a slightly better finish on theirs.

andymi86 06-25-2011 04:46 PM

Brewday went pretty well it was my first time decocting so that was a bit rough, but it worked out. My gravity was a bit lower than I expected but that's likely due to running the wheat and barley together thru the lhbs mill. I'll hand grind them next time and use a smaller gap for the wheat.

I should mention they were almost out of red wheat so I used half red and half white. I also threw a small amount (6oz) of oats during the boil on a recommendation of a brewer friend.

Off to a quick and health fermentation. My looking forward to bottling this in 12 days. =-]

Zen_Brew 06-26-2011 07:33 PM

Glad to hear you got it brewed. I think you'll be fine with the half red wheat and half white. I don't normally pull a decoction as I'm lazy, but that should up your maltiness a bit. I'm curious how the oats will play in. They generally add a smoothness or creaminess to a beer, which could be interesting but may play against the slight acid bite traditionally in a Hef. I'll be interested what your impression of the beer with the oats is.

Cheers

Woodbury419 08-27-2011 10:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zen_Brew (Post 2850132)

The mash profile may look a bit confusing. The beer was done all grain on a HERMS system. Initial mash step was an acid rest at approximately 112 degrees. This helps acidify the mash and lends an acid bite to the finished beer. I have been told it also makes the flavor profile lean a bit more towards cloves over banana.

After the rest at 112 the temperature was ramped up to 152. On my system while ramping at full power and recirculating I move about 1.5 to 2 degrees per minute. So the temp basically went through all the protein rest and high fermentability ranges on it's way to 152 which took about 20 minutes. The temp was then held and recirculated at 152 for an additional 60 minutes, then moved to the boil kettle for a 90 minute boil.

It's not a acid rest, that would be the protein rest. Acid rests are generally no longer used, those temps are much lower and poorly modified grains needed that acid rest. Buuuuut!! You are right, some time in the 112-113F range does lend a hand on those banana and clove flavor profiles. If possible in conjuction with that mash rest if you ferment in an open vessel oxygen lends a helping hand and increasing those levels too.

andymi86 08-27-2011 11:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zen_Brew (Post 3038564)
Glad to hear you got it brewed. I think you'll be fine with the half red wheat and half white. I don't normally pull a decoction as I'm lazy, but that should up your maltiness a bit. I'm curious how the oats will play in. They generally add a smoothness or creaminess to a beer, which could be interesting but may play against the slight acid bite traditionally in a Hef. I'll be interested what your impression of the beer with the oats is.

Cheers

Just wanted to say my beer turned out great! I entered into the Gnarley Barley brew festival and it took 1st for German Wheat and 3rd in Best of Show. Thanks for the recipe!

Zen_Brew 09-04-2011 10:46 PM

Congratulations on the contest placing Andy! This beer has been my most consistent placer in contests racking up about 5 or 6 1st places in the last year. Sadly it has yet to get any BOS awards, even once after scoring a 44 and the highest total in that competition. When it scored the 44 all the BOS beers were high gravity beers which I think reflects on what is popular in the brewing community these days.

andymi86 09-04-2011 10:53 PM

I hear you on that. I lost out to two wood-aged beers in BOS. I was told by the brewery who was picking a 2012 Pro-Am (I'm friends with the guys there and they brew German styles) that it was on of their favorites, but they still picked a bourbon barrel stout for their Pro-Am.


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