Home Brew Forums > Recipe Database > HomeBrewTalk.com Recipe Database > Stout > All-Grain - Ode To Arthur, Irish Stout (Guinness Clone)

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-24-2010, 03:35 PM   #131
400d
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Bosnia and Herzegovina
Posts: 584
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by Doog_Si_Reeb View Post

I was going through this thread again and ran across my post from last year. I'm brewing this recipe today, exactly one year to the day! 1/25/09 and now 1/25/10. Again, I'm brewing it up for a St. Patty's party... I am certainly a creature of habit.

Today I am going for a whole pound of roasted barley versus the .75 pound I used last year. Last year's tasted wonderful but I'd like it to have a little more roast flavor this year. I've also been souring a bottle of Guinness 350 for 6 days to add at the end of the boil. Thanks again for a great recipe!

what's this souring of guinness all about?
__________________
Brew me a river...
400d is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-24-2010, 05:38 PM   #132
Doog_Si_Reeb
Beer is Good. And stuff!
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Doog_Si_Reeb's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 844
Liked 14 Times on 11 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by 400d View Post
what's this souring of guinness all about?
Supposedly, to get the sour note, Guinness sours some of their beer and adds that to the batch. Some threads on HBT talk about putting some Guinness in a bowl and leaving it out to sour for a week. Then the soured Guinness needs to be pasteurized before adding it to the brew. Instead of separately pasteurizing the sour Guinness, I'm going to add it to the boil kettle with 10 minutes remaining. This is a first for me so I don't have a lot of helpful info, but try the link below for some HBT threads.

http://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1GGLS_enUS332US332&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=sour+guinness+site:http://www.homebrewtalk.com/
__________________
Uff Da Picobrewery

Primary: BohPils3
Kegged: Vienna Lager, Mánagarmr Stout, Ratatoskr IIPA, Cider
Bottled: Yule Gruit
Doog_Si_Reeb is online now  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-25-2010, 03:37 PM   #133
Myrdhyn
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: North Alabama
Posts: 303
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default


Well just to report back, I brewed this one Friday, and it was my first ever flawless brew day, the very essence of RDWHAHB. No boilovers, no temp issues, no crazy gravity readings, no eternal cooling (thanks super cold groundwater), 70% efficiency with my new ugly-corona grain mill (time to tighten that sucker up). I believe I even ended up with the exact same 1.044 OG that Beirmuncher did. Very excited about this brew.

The only minor issue I had was I estimated all my volumes/boiloff rates exactly, but then got distracted preparing my sparge water (had friends over working on car stereos) and prepped enough for my pre-boil volume w/o compensating for grain aborbtion/mashtun deadspace, so only ended up with 4.75g instead of 5.5g post boil; however, this mistake doesn't count as a flaw in the brewday b/c it was directly my own distracted fault and 100% preventable, and it DID confirm my 1.5g/hr boiloff rate with my new pot.

Sorry for the rambling, I just had to share my brewday/excitement over this brew with people that would understand/appreciate it.

__________________

Left tap: Myrd's IPA
Right tap: Heffeweizen
Kegged: Blimey's ESB, Apfelwein, Ed's Haus Pale Ale
Fermenting: Air, but soon to be Ode-to-Arthur and more Apfelwein.

Myrdhyn is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-25-2010, 04:00 PM   #134
jtlawlor
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Aurora
Posts: 168
Liked 8 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default


I am with you - now the waiting! I brewed this right after XMas... been in the bottle for 1wk... cracked one open to try it, even though it was undercarb'ed - it was YUMMY! Used the rest of the bottle for a nice big pot of homemade Chili!!!!

__________________

Primary: always something...

Brewed: Scottish Ale 80 - Ode to Arthur Stout - Benrath Alt - Araucania Huaso Wit - Two Hearted Ale - Dark Star Porter - Yoopers Dead Guy Ale - Cassandra the Dark, Russian Imp. Stout - Yooper's Fat Tire - Scott-A-Tron IPA - Orange Kolsch - I69PA - Rye Opener - Lick Me I am an Irish Stout - Fat Thaddeus the Third Triple - Holy ESB of Antioch

*Member of PALE (Plainfield Ale and Lager Enthusiasts)

O'Leathlobhair Brewery

jtlawlor is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-29-2010, 04:16 AM   #135
Myrdhyn
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: North Alabama
Posts: 303
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default


Checked my gravity at 1.015 tonight. Hoping it drops a few more points of the next two days, about to raise the temp in the brew closet to around 70* and hold it there. Then (if the weather stays cool) I'll crash chill it in the garage for a few days.

The flat hydrometer sample is already the best damn beer I've ever brewed. Can't wait for it to hit the keg. Thanks BierMuncher.

__________________

Left tap: Myrd's IPA
Right tap: Heffeweizen
Kegged: Blimey's ESB, Apfelwein, Ed's Haus Pale Ale
Fermenting: Air, but soon to be Ode-to-Arthur and more Apfelwein.

Myrdhyn is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-05-2010, 08:15 PM   #136
droopy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 69
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by BierMuncher View Post
You can't carbonate with beer gas. Nitrogen doesn't abosrb into the beer. Beer gas is used for pushing the beer.

In a lot of older pubs, the distance the beer has to travel from casks to the taps is quite a long distance and requires substantial pressure. To apply that much pressure using CO2 only would over carbonate the beer...hence...beer gas mix. It can be set at a higher pressure to push beer over long distance, without absorbing, and over carbing the beer.

I have had success force carbonating with both popular beer gas mixes (all beer gas is a mix unless you specify pure nitrogen-- which i use to push wine on tap.
Either the 75% nitogen/25% CO2 beer gas mix (typically this mix has a female regulator attachment), or the 70% nitrogen/30% CO2 (typically or at sometimes has the male regulator attachment-- just like any CO2 tank) work fine.
No priming of the keg is necessary. Just hook the kegs with flat bright beer in them to the beer gas and set the regulator between 35 and 40 PSI for a few days. As the beer cools in the kegerator and absorbs the gases pour a pint every day-- out of a stout faucet of course-- until you get your desired carbonation/head. Then dial the regulator back to 30 to 35PSI. This is the serving pressure and can be adjusted within that range or there abouts to control the head of your beer.

If you over carbonate by accident just turn off the gas and bleed the relief valve and leave the keg for a day. Pour a beer-- if still over carbonated repeat... This of course is based on the beer being 38F and using 5 to 6 ft of 3/16" beer line. Your regulator pressure will need to be increased if you serve the beer warmer.

As a side note-- the beer gas tanks-- at least the one with a female regulator attachment are different then CO2 tanks. They have stem mechanism that helps mix the gases properly when released.

However IME the gases do settle and probably stratify (layer). IME as the tanks empty the force carbonating takes longer-- sometimes I shoot some straight CO2 in the keg to speed the process up. I assume this is because most of CO2 has been push out already (CO2 is heavier then nitrogen and the tanks draw at least partially from the bottom of the tank)

What i have found helps a great deal is-- if can remember to--- carefully pickup, flip up side down, and shake the beer gas tank periodically... I do it very time i clean the beer lines and it has really helped when carbonating a nitro beer when the tank gets low.

Getting both the nitro and C02 to absorb into the beer is important in getting the right head out of your faucet. The nitrogen does dissolve into the beer-- it just takes 30 PSI to do it-- and it is whats responsible for that beautiful cascading effect of gas leisurely leaving the pint and forming a beautiful head. The CO2 is important as well as it gives the beer mild carbonation that lasts as you drink--- b/c as soon as that cascading effect is over after the pour-- all the nitrogen has left the beer-- and without the CO2 dissolved in the beer -- the beer would taste extremely flat.

Nitrogen is wonderful because it creates the fine, frothy, silky, and goddess like bubbles, in the head of a guinness or proper guinness clone as the case may be... Unlike CO2 ---which is 4 molecules in 10,000 in our atmosphere, and explodes from the beer like on frantic jail break looking for freedom and creating large frothy bubbles and escape holes (great for standard pint but not for an irish stout)--- Nitrogen is 70% of our atmosphere and is in no rush to join its fellow friends outside the beer-- so it leisurely floats up and leaves the beer ever so gently, leaving behind barely noticeable and petite little bubbles-- which are just the perfect compliment to a well crafted pint of irish stout!

P.S. The 10% roasted barley, 25% flaked barley, and the rest pale malt is the great recipe for a guinness clone... A great variation is to substitute some roasted barley for chocolate malt or darker carafa. The hops don't matter-- 25 to 40 IBUS to taste. You only needed a boiling addition (60-90 minutes). I often just rinse the yeast off and reuse dry hops from a previous IPA. Works great and saves cash. My favorite yeasts are either the irish or american. The british is does not compliment a dry stout and often the final gravity remains high enough so that floating the stout on pales or lagers doesn't work. the american clears much more quickly is good, and avoid me from having to have multiple strains on hand. The irish adds diacetyl flavor that actually balances the harshness of the roasted barley nicely. If you plan on black and tans make sure to keep you OG below 1.045 so that the final gravity will be lower then anything you plan to float the beer on. If it ain't it won't float!

Cheers!


Drew
__________________

Last edited by droopy; 02-05-2010 at 09:06 PM.
droopy is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-08-2010, 01:50 PM   #137
HopheadNJ
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
HopheadNJ's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: The Garden State
Posts: 308
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default


I'll be brewing this one this weekend. Hopefully I can getr' done for St. Patricks day! Looking forward to this one... Any results on adding the soured Guinness?

__________________
Primary: Late Cascade Pale
Draft:Amarillo Pale Ale, Dry Session Stout
I Drink Good Beer
HopheadNJ is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-08-2010, 02:58 PM   #138
droopy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 69
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by HopheadNJ View Post
I'll be brewing this one this weekend. Hopefully I can getr' done for St. Patricks day! Looking forward to this one... Any results on adding the soured Guinness?
Tried this a few times with some results. The two ways I have done this are by transferring a little over quart (40 ounces) or so of the finished stout into a growler and then adding a couple tablespoons of pale malt directly to it and leaving for a week or two around 65 - 70F. Then re rake the sample into stainless cooking pot (i covered it with tin foil), and gently pasteurize at 160-70F for 20 minutes to keep the concoction from spoiling your whole keg! You can go higher in temperature but the ethanol evaporates around 172F so you'll for sure be removing your booz from that small sample.

Pale malt or any malt i suppose is covered in lactic acid bacteria-- that's how it works... And is also the reason you shouldn't leave a mash going too long (4+ hours)...

The other way is to buy a few favorite stouts and sour them the same way.

Be careful to transfew your soured beer quietly-- no splashing/pouring--- so that is does not oxygenate and add off--cardboard tasting like flavors...

I was pretty anal about that and used a small CO2 cartridge to shoot the gas into the growler and stainless pot before racking-- CO2 is much heavier then air and won't go anywhere so long as you don't have breeze going...

Probably not necessary though...

Once you have your soured beer made, pasteurized and cooled--- pour a pint (16oz) of your guinness clone which most likely on tap now and add an single ounce of soured beer and taste...

That's what adding 40 ounces of the soured mix to the entire 5 gallon batch will taste like more or less. 5 gallons = 640 ounces or 40 pints... (40 ounces is 1/16th of your entire 5 gallon batch)... Same as what is in your pint samplier-- 1 ounce sour mix and 16 ounces stout.

If you like that flavor add-- dump the whole thing in keg... If too strong than dial it back to half an ounce or whatever...

Cheers,

Drew
__________________
droopy is offline  
BierMuncher Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-08-2010, 04:11 PM   #139
BierMuncher
...My Junk is Ugly...
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BierMuncher's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 12,033
Liked 479 Times on 294 Posts
Likes Given: 156

Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by droopy View Post
Tried this a few times with some results. The two ways I have done this are by transferring a little over quart (40 ounces) or so of the finished stout into a growler and then adding a couple tablespoons of pale malt directly to it and leaving for a week or two around 65 - 70F. Then re rake the sample into stainless cooking pot (i covered it with tin foil), and gently pasteurize at 160-70F for 20 minutes to keep the concoction from spoiling your whole keg! You can go higher in temperature but the ethanol evaporates around 172F so you'll for sure be removing your booz from that small sample.

Pale malt or any malt i suppose is covered in lactic acid bacteria-- that's how it works... And is also the reason you shouldn't leave a mash going too long (4+ hours)...

The other way is to buy a few favorite stouts and sour them the same way.

Be careful to transfew your soured beer quietly-- no splashing/pouring--- so that is does not oxygenate and add off--cardboard tasting like flavors...

I was pretty anal about that and used a small CO2 cartridge to shoot the gas into the growler and stainless pot before racking-- CO2 is much heavier then air and won't go anywhere so long as you don't have breeze going...

Probably not necessary though...

Once you have your soured beer made, pasteurized and cooled--- pour a pint (16oz) of your guinness clone which most likely on tap now and add an single ounce of soured beer and taste...

That's what adding 40 ounces of the soured mix to the entire 5 gallon batch will taste like more or less. 5 gallons = 640 ounces or 40 pints... (40 ounces is 1/16th of your entire 5 gallon batch)... Same as what is in your pint samplier-- 1 ounce sour mix and 16 ounces stout.

If you like that flavor add-- dump the whole thing in keg... If too strong than dial it back to half an ounce or whatever...

Cheers,

Drew
Great Post.
__________________

*******
Check Out My Rolling Kegerator

BierMuncher Tried & Trues:
Tits-Up IIPA (3-Time Medalist), Black Pearl Porter, Kona Pale Ale, Outer Limits IPA, Centennial Blonde (4.0%), Nierra Sevada (SNPA), SWMBO Slayer Belgian Blonde,

BierMuncher is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-08-2010, 04:16 PM   #140
droopy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 69
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default


I got to do anything but work right now

Fully conditioned and clear guinness on the quick----

---use an american yeast, 1056 of safale 05 is what i use. The irish -- wyeast anyways is not very flocculant, although it does match guinness much better. Either way will work-- use a touch more isinglass if going irish:
- original gravity 1.038 to 1.044
- ferment out primary 70F (5 days)
- transfer into secondary 5 days or until fermentation is totally done (american yeast is faster then irish IME),
- transfer again (i like using a keg as i can purge with CO2 and prevent oxygenation) and add dry isinglass (1/8 teaspoon partially dissolved in a Budweiser for 20 minutes) and polyclar mixture (like a teaspoon), then add the whole kitten kaboodle into the keg as transferring. Purge airspace at top of keg with C02. Agitate beer WELL! (shake!)
- wait 48 hours to clarify, then transfer into serving keg, put in kegerator 38F (if doing a keg to keg transfer and drawing from the bottom via keg dipstick-- discard the first pint or so as it will be a thick yeast/isinglass/polyclar slurry-- once beer flows clear put it in the serving keg!)
- set C02 tank at 40 PSI and leave for 12-18 hours
- Disconnect from CO2 tank and hook up to beer gas at 40PSI

Should be pouring frothy, cascading, guinness with a few days from then. Once it is dial beer gas to 30-35 PSI.

if still not fizzy enough to get the stout faucett cranking the way you like after a three days or so-- disconnect the beer gas--pull the relief valve, and charge the keg with 40 PSI CO2, then re attach the beer gas. check the next day.

This carbonation process is all variable but that is the general idea to get it done quickly without man handling (shaking) kegs.

You can also agitate the kegs while cold and the gas is hooked up and on-- that will do it in a matter of minutes but is way more temperamental. If experimenting or rushed and tackling carbonation that way-- do the CO2 first for mild carbonation then the beer gas--- On both accounts agitate a couple minutes. check carbonation. repeat until where you want it.

You can ferment the beer quicker (turbo yeast would be one way and/or more aggressive finings, or cold crashing and cutting fermentation times down) but you'll sacrifice quality.

__________________

Last edited by droopy; 02-08-2010 at 06:21 PM.
droopy is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Murphy's Irish Stout Clone KingBrianI Recipes/Ingredients 35 01-30-2014 10:40 PM
kit Guinness clone to chipotle stout questions? brewingsam Recipes/Ingredients 14 04-11-2009 12:06 AM
Guinness Extra Stout Clone? ddwill Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 09-10-2008 03:54 PM
Is Irish yeast best for a guinness clone? jzal8 Recipes/Ingredients 10 02-08-2008 11:53 PM
Guinness extra stout clone Mustangfreak General Beer Discussion 5 01-15-2008 01:11 AM