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Old 12-18-2013, 04:59 PM   #141
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I would consider doing a double batch if its all mixed together. Get enough for another batch minus black patent and carapils. Double the black patent will throw it off for taste and of couse color. Hop ibu will be off as well, thats why I suggest a double batch. I will be worth it in the long run. Everytime I make it, it doesn't last long, family and friends seem to come around more when they know its on tap.
That sounds like a good fix however I only have the capacity for 5 gallon batches at a time, so maybe I could do that, but mix all the grains together to get a homogenized mix and then just split it in half yeah? and then run two batches one after another in my pot, whuddyathink?
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Old 12-18-2013, 06:36 PM   #142
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Sounds like a good option. It wont be exact but better then using way to much of one type of grain.

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Old 01-04-2014, 12:33 PM   #143
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I must have done somwthing wrong. I put some chocolate nibs in secondary, last week i finally had the first bottle and it had a smoky after taste, and a sort of root sweet smell.
Not what i expected.
Can anyone tell me what was your results? Roasty? Smooth?
Id appreciate any feedback

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Old 01-06-2014, 02:35 PM   #144
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How much chocolate nibs did you add to the secondary? Should be a smooth subtile chocolate after taste.


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Old 01-08-2014, 01:15 AM   #145
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How much chocolate nibs did you add to the secondary? Should be a smooth subtile chocolate after taste.

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I added just a little bit after leaving in the vodka for a week. But i'm reading on "how to brew" by john palmer that high fermentation temps will produce really bad off-flavors in the beer.
The batch fermented at 70 -72F. That might be it
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Old 01-08-2014, 08:49 AM   #146
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I added just a little bit after leaving in the vodka for a week. But i'm reading on "how to brew" by john palmer that high fermentation temps will produce really bad off-flavors in the beer.
The batch fermented at 70 -72F. That might be it
That's quite a blanket statement though. I mean, there are plenty of different yeasts that love a good warm fermentation. A lot of Belgian yeasts for example thrive and produce wonderful aromas in that 70-72 temperature range. Some can even handle as much as 80-86F.
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Old 01-08-2014, 10:08 PM   #147
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That's quite a blanket statement though. I mean, there are plenty of different yeasts that love a good warm fermentation. A lot of Belgian yeasts for example thrive and produce wonderful aromas in that 70-72 temperature range. Some can even handle as much as 80-86F.
I cant find a reason why the beer doesnt tast very good. What contamination tastes like? That could be it too.
Also it took me a about two hours to cool the wort, maybe thats part of the off flavors...
I will open another bottle tonight or tomorrow and try to identify any aroma or taste so i can let u guys know..
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Old 01-09-2014, 07:52 AM   #148
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I cant find a reason why the beer doesnt tast very good. What contamination tastes like? That could be it too.
Also it took me a about two hours to cool the wort, maybe thats part of the off flavors...
I will open another bottle tonight or tomorrow and try to identify any aroma or taste so i can let u guys know..
One other thing to consider is that as a beer ages (assuming you're bottle conditioning and not force carbonating) is that the yeast will continue to scavenge off flavors in the beer and will continue to bring the gravity down as low as it can go. I once made a very high gravity (1.108 OG) barleywine that tasted horrible when I first made it. After letting it ferment for 2 weeks in primary, and then in the secondary for 3 weeks I bottled it, waited a couple weeks and tried it. It was bad. Like really really bad. So I sat on the bottles for a year and a half, and then entered them in a competition just so I could get an expert opinion on "what did I do wrong?" But to my surprise, after a year and a half cellared in the basement, they not only took their category "an excellent example of the complexity and depth of the style" to quote one BJCP certified judge, they placed in the Best in Show... so I guess my advice is to be patient, and try your stout again in 2 or 3 months. Most stout is improved with age.
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Old 01-10-2014, 03:40 PM   #149
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Originally Posted by Cultkid
One other thing to consider is that as a beer ages (assuming you're bottle conditioning and not force carbonating) is that the yeast will continue to scavenge off flavors in the beer and will continue to bring the gravity down as low as it can go. I once made a very high gravity (1.108 OG) barleywine that tasted horrible when I first made it. After letting it ferment for 2 weeks in primary, and then in the secondary for 3 weeks I bottled it, waited a couple weeks and tried it. It was bad. Like really really bad. So I sat on the bottles for a year and a half, and then entered them in a competition just so I could get an expert opinion on "what did I do wrong?" But to my surprise, after a year and a half cellared in the basement, they not only took their category "an excellent example of the complexity and depth of the style" to quote one BJCP certified judge, they placed in the Best in Show... so I guess my advice is to be patient, and try your stout again in 2 or 3 months. Most stout is improved with age.
Cultkid, thank you SO MUCH for your advice!

I had another bottle last night and the smell improved slightly, there were notes on chocolate. I will follow your advice and wait a few months.

Thanks again man!
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Old 01-13-2014, 04:56 AM   #150
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Just brewed a version of this today - second brew ever. I modified things based on some advice and available ingredients. Used Amber DME instead of light. Used 12 oz of black patent, and added 8 oz of roasted barley. Made a starter of Windsor and pitched a little hot due to screwups with the wort chiller. So around 85 degrees when I pitched (kinda scared about that). Corrected OG 1.064. It was down to the mid seventies and bubbling like crazy by the evening. I moved it into cooler basement to try to get this thing down to 70. I'm kinda worried about the temperature and such crazy activity (had to use a blowoff hose in a bucket primary). Smells very roasty - kinda what I was going for, but the fuggles smell overly prominent. We'll see what happens! Comments welcome! Keep you posted.

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