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Old 01-30-2009, 09:24 PM   #11
Pelikan
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The moment you've all been waiting for...

DC Raspberry, first taste:

Appearance: Opaque black with reddish brown highlights. Some haze present, but this is a very minor aesthetic concern for a brew of this nature. Two finger beige head quickly diminishes to one finger, then sticks around for a bit. Lacing is present.

4.5 out of 5

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Smell: Strong raspberry in the nose, complimented by roasted grain, chocolate, vanilla, and a hint of alcohol (in that order). Very well balanced -- the berry is pronounced, yet not cloying or off-putting.

5 out of 5

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Taste: Exactly what I as going for. The berry is right there on the tongue, followed swiftly by vanilla, chocolate and roastiness, then finishing off with raspberry in the nose. Some vinous notes from the fermented fruit. Not at all cloying, confectionary, or artificial -- if you're looking for these traits, this is not the recipe for you.

At this point (4 weeks in bottles), it could use a bit more time to round out, but that's really nit picking in the wake of what turned out to be a great brew.

4.5 of 5

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Mouth-feel: The mouth feel is right where it should be -- not too heavy, not too light. Carbonation is perfect (I used 4.5 ounces corn sugar).

5 of 5

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Drinkability: This beer isn't nearly as heavy as you'd think. Indeed, it's quite refreshing, and wouldn't be inappropriate as a summer indulgence. The alcohol content is up there, given the fermentable nature of raspberry, plus the vodka additions. It's hard to pin it down exactly, but from feel alone I'd say it's easily 7-8%...so you won't be having more than a couple in one sitting.

4 of 5

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Overall: A great brew. I was looking to make the Rolls Royce of extracts, and I think this comes about as close to the mark as one could hope to get. I can't help but thinking this would be even better all-grain, and indeed, I'm going to work it into the AG rotation somewhere down the line.

As it stands, this is some fine stuff, especially considering I brewed it up using only the most basic equipment. The only major shortcoming is cost, but there are certain corners the savvy brewer could cut and still arrive at something great.

23 out of 25 = 92%

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Last edited by Pelikan; 03-01-2009 at 03:16 AM.
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Old 02-01-2009, 10:18 PM   #12
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Thanks for the thorough review. I bottle my batch this weekend. The waiting game is killing me. The sample I took while transfering to secondary had me thinking I found my new favorite dessert! I'll give a full report in another month.

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Old 02-03-2009, 08:31 PM   #13
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Pelikan, I see you did a 3 gallon boil. What was your process for getting this to 5.25 gallons?

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Old 02-03-2009, 08:38 PM   #14
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Adding the difference in pre-boiled water to get it back up to 5.25. In other words, you're going to be boiling about 3-3.5 gallons of straight, clear water, then cooling it. Add about 2 gallons of the cooled water to the primary, then add the cooled wort, then top off as needed to 5.25.

That said, if you have the ability, a full boil is always preferred.

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Old 02-03-2009, 09:06 PM   #15
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Will the amounts you listed out be sufficient for a full 5 gallon boil? I'm just not sure how to adjust the amounts upward if what you did was only for a 3 gal boil.

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Old 02-03-2009, 09:14 PM   #16
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Bear in mind that if you want your cooled wort to finish off at five gallons or thereabouts, you'll need to boil 6 gallons volume, as you'll lose at least a gallon to boil-off.

If you're going to do six gallons as a starting boil volume, you can subtract one half ounce of the Williamette for the 60 minute addition (ie: 1 oz at 60 as opposed to 1.5). Otherwise, keep everything else the same.

Also, one thing to note is that the Willamette hops I used were on the high end for the strain in terms of AA. Compare the actual AA of the hops you get to the recipe, and adjust as required for your boil volume.

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Last edited by Pelikan; 02-03-2009 at 11:17 PM.
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Old 02-04-2009, 03:06 PM   #17
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For the British Chocolate, Roasted Barley and Flaked Oats did you just do a standard mash/sparge, or steep, or something else?

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Old 02-04-2009, 06:15 PM   #18
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The grains were steeped according to general extract procedures. Put your grains in a muslin bag or similar, then put them in the pot along with 3 gallons/cold water. Bring the temp up to 150*-160*F using medium/high heat (a "candy" thermometer works well for monitoring this, available in any grocery store). It should take you roughly a half hour to hit 150*F.

Once there, start your timer for 30 minutes. Keep the heat going until you get somewhere slightly north of 155*F, then turn it down to low (or kill it all together). Make sure the temp stays above 150*F for the remainder of the steep.

Once your time is done, remove the grain bag and let it drip. "Sparge" with 1-2 quarts of warm-hot water (ideally at about 150-160, no higher). You can use tap on the highest heat setting, provided your tap water doesn't have massive amounts of chlorine or other funk.

And there you have it. This technique is broadly applicable to any extract recipe with special grains.

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Old 02-04-2009, 09:07 PM   #19
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I'm going to give this a shot next week. I have two last questions for you regarding your recipe. You list all your late additions were at 10 min, but in your comments you had the additions at 15 min. Which one is it? And last, the D2 syrup - you added all that at 15 min - not split up like the DME? Thanks for the advice. I can't wait to give this one a shot.

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Old 02-04-2009, 09:25 PM   #20
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I've edited the original post to make it a bit clearer. The whirlfloc, yeast nutrient, lactose, malto, etc, is all added with about 10 minutes remaining. The left-over DME and all of the D2 syrup is added at 15 minutes remaining.

In practice, this generally means adding the DME and stirring until it all dissolves, then adding the D2 and doing the same thing. By this time, there's only about ten minutes left anyhow, so the other stuff is then added.

The DME sometimes has a tendency to clump when its added...the extra few minutes ensures that all of the DME as been dissolved and sterilized. With the other stuff, you generally want it in the boil only as long as required to get a 100% sterilization; 10 minutes will do that just fine.

This recipe will serve you well. It's an extremely refreshing drink -- surprising in this regard given its a stout, but the D2 does a good job of lightening it up a bit so that it's not too thick. Wait as long as you can to sample it. At about 5 weeks in bottles it's still improving, and I imagine it will continue to do so for a while down the road.

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Last edited by Pelikan; 02-04-2009 at 09:29 PM.
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