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Old 05-18-2013, 07:59 AM   #1
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Default Creme Brulee Stout

Recipe Type: All Grain
Yeast: London Ale 1028
Yeast Starter: Yup. 2L on stir plate
Batch Size (Gallons): 6
Original Gravity: 1.079
Final Gravity: 1.017
IBU: 56 rager
Boiling Time (Minutes): 60
Color: 34.2 est
Primary Fermentation (# of Days & Temp): 68F until FG, apx 6 days
Secondary Fermentation (# of Days & Temp): 10 days
Tasting Notes: Charred sugar that blends with roast, sweet dark caramels, vanilla, bready backbone.

Made this for the wifey and everyone that's had it absolutely loves this beer. I'll keep this one on hand from now on. You get a good amount of vanilla, roast, caramel, and charred sugar without it being too sweet. I originally set out to do something like the southern tier creme brulee, but decided to make it less bitter and sweet. This is in no way a clone and is nothing like the ST, just inspired by it.

11.00 lb Pale Malt, Maris Otter (3.0 SRM) Grain 65.7%
1.50 lb Brown Malt (65.0 SRM) Grain 9%
1.00 lb Oats, Flaked (1.0 SRM) Grain 6%
8 oz Caramel/Crystal Malt - 80L (80.0 SRM) Grain 3%
10 oz lb Caramel/Crystal Malt -120L (120.0 SRM) Grain 3.7%
6 oz Chocolate Malt (350.0 SRM) Grain 2.2%
4oz Blakprinz (500.0 SRM) (or dehusked caraffa II) Grain 1.5%
4oz Roasted Barley (300.0 SRM) Grain 1.5%
3.00 oz Williamette [5.50%] (60 min) Hops 56.9 IBU

1.25 lb Milk Sugar (Lactose) (0.0 SRM) Sugar 7.5%
1tsp DAP
3 vanilla beans split and scraped

Mash grain at 154F. 60 min boil. Hops go in at 60.

Ferment at 68F until FG. In my case, it was 6 days and 1.017 before the lactose. Decide whether you want to secondary or add secondary ingredients into primary after hitting FG. I just add everything to primary and let time and gravity take care of things.

When it's time for secondary, split, scrape, and third the vanilla beans. Put em all in a mason jar with enough bourbon to soak and sanitize, about 2oz. Or just throw em in the fermenter if you aren't paranoid about an infection.

Put the lactose and DAP in a thick bottomed pot. Heat slowly until it turns a very dark brown, almost black. This will take a loooong time, but it will go from melting to black in a very short time! It will also not be sweet or very palatable on it's own when it's done and it will not look pretty, but that's ok. Just don't burn it. I wish I had taken pictures. I will in the next couple weeks when I remake this.

Once it cools, dump it in the fermenter along with the vanilla beans. I left it for about 10 days and it was ready for bottling.

Here's a somewhat old thread with some good info on caramelizing lactose. Clicky.

I tried dissolving the lactose and DAP in water before heating like you would with table sugar, but since it just solidified into a hard white mass when the water evaporated off. So from that experience, I would just dry caramelize it slowly.

I carbed it to 2.5vol. Surprisingly not too heavy even with all that lactose. Enjoy, it's an excellent beer.

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Old 05-29-2013, 06:32 PM   #2
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What is DAP?

The only thing I know of as DAP is sealant. Pretty sure you don't want that in your beer

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Old 05-30-2013, 12:29 AM   #3
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DAP is Diammonium phosphate. It is normally used as a yeast nutrient, but in this case, it is used to supply the nitrogen required for the maillard reactions. It should give it significantly more flavor. But I must admit, I haven't tried back to back caramelization with and without the DAP.

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Old 08-10-2013, 08:53 PM   #4
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I did the lactose a bit different this time around. I did it in two batches. The first, I dry caramelized it. The second, I added a pint of water to it, covered it and caramelized it the way you'd do table sugar. With this method, don't stir and keep it covered. Checked on it every 5 mins until it was done.

With the dry caramelization, I got a much more prominent burnt sugar note, mainly because there was a lot more burnt lactose with that method.

I got a lot more brulee notes from the wet method vs the dry. Also it was much sweeter and more complex.

With both , I add a pint of water when it's done and cooled off a bit, then bring back to a boil to get it dissolved and pourable.

img_20130810_131554.jpg  
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Old 01-12-2014, 02:52 PM   #5
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I had a very similar thought, use Southern Tier Creme Brûlée as a base but take it a little further, I used less dark malt and more C60/120 but the thought process was the same. While brewing I got distracted and forgot to add the lactose which I had planned on adding to the boil. I'm going to follow your caramelized lactose steps, seems like a no brainer to get those brûlée tastes. I'll post how it comes out in another couple weeks.

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Old 01-13-2014, 12:53 AM   #6
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When you say the caramelizing takes a long time, what's a rough time frame? Is it an hour or is it five hours? I tried this but it was such a pain and made a mess of my pans. It took several hours to get past the solidified white blob. Is this normal?

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Old 01-15-2014, 03:55 AM   #7
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I know this is a reallllly dumb question, but as a rookie brewer, I have a lot of them. When it says "Batch Size (Gallons): 6", is that the final measure or is that what I start with? This sounds like a great beer and I'm anxious to give it a shot.

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Old 01-15-2014, 04:05 AM   #8
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Generally I assume most people mean beer into the fermentor. It very well could be beer into the keg/bottling bucket but most people only have about a half gallon or less of loss between fermentor and keg so worst case scenario your only off by a small amount if you choose fermentor.

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Old 01-15-2014, 04:13 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1fast4door View Post
When you say the caramelizing takes a long time, what's a rough time frame? Is it an hour or is it five hours? I tried this but it was such a pain and made a mess of my pans. It took several hours to get past the solidified white blob. Is this normal?
caramelizing sugar can be a pain. As a chef i findadding the sugar with a splash of water and washìng down the sides with water can help. Crystallization happens quickly if the solution is tainted by impuriites or granules cooking quicker on the side of the pan. A smidge of corn syrup can prevent the crystallization process.
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Old 01-16-2014, 06:04 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ddubduder View Post
I had a very similar thought, use Southern Tier Creme Brûlée as a base but take it a little further, I used less dark malt and more C60/120 but the thought process was the same. While brewing I got distracted and forgot to add the lactose which I had planned on adding to the boil. I'm going to follow your caramelized lactose steps, seems like a no brainer to get those brûlée tastes. I'll post how it comes out in another couple weeks.
If you want something like the southern tier, you'll need a ton more crystal than what I'm using as well as a ton more vanilla. This is tame in comparison.

The lactose isn't very sweet. When you caramelize it, it adds character, but not really sweetness.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1fast4door View Post
When you say the caramelizing takes a long time, what's a rough time frame? Is it an hour or is it five hours? I tried this but it was such a pain and made a mess of my pans. It took several hours to get past the solidified white blob. Is this normal?
IIRC it took a couple hours. From experimenting, I found that adding water didn't help since the water evaporated and it crystallized before caramelization started.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ire2661 View Post
I know this is a reallllly dumb question, but as a rookie brewer, I have a lot of them. When it says "Batch Size (Gallons): 6", is that the final measure or is that what I start with? This sounds like a great beer and I'm anxious to give it a shot.
6 gallons going into the fermenter and generally around 5.5gal being bottled. If you keg, you'll end up with a little extra, probably enough for a couple swing top liter bottles full.

Quote:
Originally Posted by elsphinc View Post
caramelizing sugar can be a pain. As a chef i findadding the sugar with a splash of water and washìng down the sides with water can help. Crystallization happens quickly if the solution is tainted by impuriites or granules cooking quicker on the side of the pan. A smidge of corn syrup can prevent the crystallization process.
I found that the water didn't work so well. I've made tons of caramel as a baker and I always use water when caramelizing sugar. That's why I tried that the first attempt. The difference is that table sugar inverts during the heating process, whereas lactose just dissolves in the water. The water evaporates leaving behind a near solidified mass of lactose.

The corn syrup is worth a try. I've used it plenty of times with table sugar. I never considered it for this project. I'll give it a try next time.
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