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Old 11-08-2012, 11:25 AM   #61
ShizuokaBrad
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This looks like such a good recipe and I love Scotch ales. I'm going to give this a go in a couple of weeks. Unfortunately, it's not so easy to get some of the malts here in Japan. Specifically the melanoidin and the aromatic. Does anyone have a good substitute for these two... something like Carared, for example?
Cheers for the help!

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Old 11-08-2012, 12:04 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by ShizuokaBrad View Post
This looks like such a good recipe and I love Scotch ales. I'm going to give this a go in a couple of weeks. Unfortunately, it's not so easy to get some of the malts here in Japan. Specifically the melanoidin and the aromatic. Does anyone have a good substitute for these two... something like Carared, for example?
Cheers for the help!
Of the several Scotch ales I have brewed, this is by far my favorite. As for the malt question, when I ran across a malt equivalency table I realizee that there are a lot of malts around that have just been given proprietary or regional names, when they are identical (or close enough) to a more familiar malt, like C40L or something. There's a link somewhere on HBT, but this is the first one that popped up under Google:

http://kotmf.com/articles/maltnames.php

good luck!
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Old 11-08-2012, 12:20 PM   #63
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Thanks for that! Looks like it will be some help.

Cheers!

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Old 11-12-2012, 11:58 AM   #64
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Brewed a 10 gal batch last night. It was cold outside and it took 25 min to get my mash temp up to 154-I was at 148 for a while. Finally raised the Polar mash run up off the ground and that did it! Let the mash go for 90 min total. How do you think this may affect the beer?
I did the carmelization step and I have some advice. Use a big sauce pan with extra space to prevent boil overs. Especially if you're running back and forth to the brew pot.
Only changes I made to the recipe were I used Golden Promise base malt because I had it, put in an extra 0.5 oz of hops and targeted a 12 gal finish instead if the 11.0 in doubled recipe. The GP malt usually delivers for me and I hit the OG dead on miraculously.
My LHBS had peated malt that didn't taste so strong so I used the full amount, but be aware as they vary. It will smell and taste like a Band-Aid if you use too much. Thoughts on adding scotch to the secondary?
Please post your replies to my ?s above .

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Old 11-13-2012, 03:09 AM   #65
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bump... next recipe....

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Old 12-11-2012, 08:30 PM   #66
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Brewing this in January after the holidays. Started with a Brewer's Best Scottish Ale so it's time to revisit the style with style.

My hopping regime might be more like:
1oz EKG @ 60 min
0.5oz Northdown @ 20 min

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Old 12-20-2012, 12:00 PM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dadnboys
Brewed a 10 gal batch last night. It was cold outside and it took 25 min to get my mash temp up to 154-I was at 148 for a while. Finally raised the Polar mash run up off the ground and that did it! Let the mash go for 90 min total. How do you think this may affect the beer?
I did the carmelization step and I have some advice. Use a big sauce pan with extra space to prevent boil overs. Especially if you're running back and forth to the brew pot.
Only changes I made to the recipe were I used Golden Promise base malt because I had it, put in an extra 0.5 oz of hops and targeted a 12 gal finish instead if the 11.0 in doubled recipe. The GP malt usually delivers for me and I hit the OG dead on miraculously.
My LHBS had peated malt that didn't taste so strong so I used the full amount, but be aware as they vary. It will smell and taste like a Band-Aid if you use too much. Thoughts on adding scotch to the secondary?
Please post your replies to my ?s above .
OK, finally tasted this carbed in keg after a few days. First, I split the 10 gal into 5 gal batches and pitched Edinburg Ale yeast in one and the Scotch Ale yeast in the other. Precarb the Edinburg batch was more complex, had some ester notes reminiscent of a Belgian Ale. This beer probably fermented at 65-70 deg. FG was 1.012. The Scotch Ale batch was flatter, malt nose and the peat came through better. Fermented at 60-65 deg. FG was 1.010. Now a week later, and carbed up the 2 beers are coming closer together. Very tasty.
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Old 03-14-2013, 03:09 PM   #68
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Just my two cents on this--my buddy and I brewed this beer over the winter, and although the process went very well, we were initially shocked at the peat taste. We are both big scotch drinkers and love peated scotch, so it's not that we can't handle or aren't familiar with the taste--it's just that it was really intense. But as the beer has aged, the flavor has really rounded out, and the harsh phenolic "preserved corpse" character has turned into a slightly medicinal, briny, smokey taste, much more like a good scotch. It has really blended in well, and we now think it's a great beer. So I guess my advice is, follow the recipe but then let it age for at least 2 months before drinking. Thanks for the recipe!

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Old 03-14-2013, 03:17 PM   #69
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Originally Posted by motorneuron View Post
Just my two cents on this--my buddy and I brewed this beer over the winter, and although the process went very well, we were initially shocked at the peat taste. We are both big scotch drinkers and love peated scotch, so it's not that we can't handle or aren't familiar with the taste--it's just that it was really intense. But as the beer has aged, the flavor has really rounded out, and the harsh phenolic "preserved corpse" character has turned into a slightly medicinal, briny, smokey taste, much more like a good scotch. It has really blended in well, and we now think it's a great beer. So I guess my advice is, follow the recipe but then let it age for at least 2 months before drinking. Thanks for the recipe!
A few things:

1. I love peaty Scotch (Laphroiag being my favorite).

2. I have made this recipe several times, and am brewing it again this Spring, and made according to recipe (4 oz. peated malt, I use Simpson's), I don't find it all that peaty (I start drinking after 4 weeks conditioning), in fact it's more of a "hint" of peat, enough so that I may try another ounce this year.

3. Maybe you got some strong peat......
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Old 03-14-2013, 03:52 PM   #70
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Hmm, I also used Simpson's. Maybe it was just really fresh, or something. Despite a one-month stint in the primary, the phenol character (reallyl bandaid-like) was initially so intense that we thought we had an infection. Well, I don't know, but I'm just glad it turned out well in the end.

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